Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Changing microbial dynamics in the wake of the Macondo blowout

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

In an article in the September issue of BioScience, Samantha Joye and colleagues describe Gulf of Mexico microbial communities in the aftermath of the 2010 Macondo blowout. The authors describe revealing population-level responses of hydrocarbon-degrading microbes to the unprecedented deepwater oil plume.

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Now we know why it’s so hard to deceive children

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Daily interactions require bargaining, be it for food, money or even making plans. These situations inevitably lead to a conflict of interest as both parties seek to maximise their gains. To deal with them, we need to understand the other person’s intentions, beliefs and desires and then use that to inform our bargaining strategy.

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If 2 New Yorkers Shared a Cab …

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

A team of mathematicians and engineers has calculated that if taxi riders were willing to share a cab, New York City could reduce the current fleet of 13,500 taxis up to 40 percent.

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Giant garbage patches help redefine ocean boundaries

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an area of environmental concern between Hawaii and California where the ocean surface is marred by scattered pieces of plastic, which outweigh plankton in that part of the ocean and pose risks to fish, turtles and birds that eat the trash. Scientists believe the garbage patch is but one of at least five, each located in the center of large, circular ocean currents called gyres that suck in and trap floating debris.

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New method for non-invasive prostate cancer screening

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Cancer screening is a critical approach for preventing cancer deaths because cases caught early are often more treatable. But while there are already existing ways to screen for different types of cancer, there is a great need for even more safe, cheap and effective methods to save even more lives.

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DealBook: Compuware Agrees to $2.5 Billion Buyout

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Compuware has agreed to sell itself to the private equity firm Thoma Bravo for about $2.5 billion, bowing out after years under pressure from Elliott Management.

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Bits Blog: Uber Service Banned Across Germany by Frankfurt Court

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The injunction will stand until the court holds a hearing later this year. Uber said it would continue to operate in Germany despite the threat of criminal charges and fines.

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Scientists create renewable fossil fuel alternative using bacteria

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The development is a step towards commercial production of a source of fuel that could one day provide an alternative to fossil fuels.

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Scientists find key to te first cell differentiation in mammals

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The CNIC scientists, working with investigators at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, the Sloan-Kettering Institute and the University of Kumamoto, have identified a regulatory element implicated in the function of a gene that plays a crucial role in the first cell differentiation event, which gives rise to the embryonic and extraembryonic cell lineages. The discovery is published in Developmental Cell.

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Microsoft begins dropping OneDrive’s 2GB file size limit

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Cloud storage file size limits were a sad necessity back in the days when Internet speeds were low and storage prices were high. But now that those constraints are inverting, artificial file size barriers are crumbling. Case in point: This weekend, Microsoft began slowly and quietly dropping individual file size limits for OneDrive users, following in the footsteps of Dropbox and Google Drive.

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Arctic expedition pioneers technique for polar bear research

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

A team of French scientists working in partnership with conservation organization WWF has for the first time isolated polar bear DNA from a track left in the snow.

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Clean air halves health costs in Chinese city

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Air pollution regulations over the last decade in Taiyuan, China, have substantially improved the health of people living there, accounting for a greater than 50% reduction in costs associated with loss of life and disability between 2001 and 2010, according to researchers at the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at the Mailman School of Public Health, the Shanxi Medical University, the Center of Diseases Control and Prevention of Taiyuan Municipality, and Shanghai Fudan University School of Public Health.

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California quake points to research advancements in retrofitting older buildings

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The 6.0 earthquake that rocked Napa, California, on Aug. 24 is placing the spotlight on efforts by property owners and municipalities to retrofit older buildings and improve their ability to withstand earthquakes.

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How financial decisions are made

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Jayant Kale didn’t grow up dreaming of becoming a leading expert in corporate finance and mutual fund investment. But he’s happy he invested in that market early in life.

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Robots unlikely to take big bites out of employment, expert says

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Advances in artificial intelligence and robotics mean that machines will soon be able to do many of the tasks of today’s workers. And not just blue collar jobs in areas such as manufacturing, but even in such white collar occupations as lawyers, doctors and – gulp – journalists.

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‘Factorisation factory’ smashes number-cracking record

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

A series of huge numbers have been broken into their prime-number building blocks faster than ever before, with implications for online cryptography

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We are all made of stars

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Astronomers spend most of their time contemplating the universe, quite comfortable in the knowledge that we are just a speck among billions of planets, stars and galaxies. But last week, the Australian astronomical community came together to turn their collective gaze from looking outwards to looking inwards.

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Netflix unveils new way to share recommendations

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Netflix is giving its Internet video subscribers a more discreet way to recommend movies and TV shows to their Facebook friends after realizing most people don’t want to share their viewing habits with large audiences.

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How bubble studies benefit science and engineering

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The image above shows a perfect bubble imploding in weightlessness. This bubble, and many like it, are produced by the researchers from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland. What makes this bubble so perfect is that it is produced in a weightless environment, which means it is not deformed by gravity. These research bubbles are the most spherical known to science at this time.

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Research helps identify memory molecules

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

A newly discovered method of identifying the creation of proteins in the body could lead to new insights into how learning and memories are impaired in Alzheimer’s disease.

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Retiree couples who plan together thrive together

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

A University of Queensland researcher is developing a program to help couples make the most of their retirement.

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ESA video: The ATV-5 Georges Lemaitre loading process

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

This time-lapse video shows the ATV-5 Georges Lemaitre loading process and its integration on the Ariane 5 launcher before its transfer and launch to the International Space Station from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana on 29 July 2014.

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New satellite maps out Napa Valley earthquake

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Scientists have used a new Earth-observation satellite called Sentinel-1A to map the ground movements caused by the earthquake that shook up California’s wine-producing Napa Valley on 24 August 2014.

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Future solar panels

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Conventional photovoltaic technology uses large, heavy, opaque, dark silicon panels, but this could soon change. The IK4-Ikerlan research centre is working with the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country within the X10D European project on new materials to produce solar panels in order to come up with alternatives to the current panels. What is needed to improve the functioning of cells with a large surface are materials that cost less to produce and offer greater energy efficiency.

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Rainfall monitoring with mobile phones

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Agriculture, water resource management, drought and flood warnings, etc.: rainfall monitoring is vital in many areas. But the observation networks remain insufficient. This is not the case for antennas for mobile telephones, which cover 90% of the world’s inhabited areas. Besides transmitting radio signals, they record signal disturbances, which are partly due to precipitation, in order to monitor the quality of networks. The idea of the Rain Cell Africa consortium researchers is to benefit from this amount of data to improve rainfall monitoring and spatialisation. This is a method whose effectiveness has been proven, with a reliability rate of 95% for detecting rainfall events. This work, which was conducted in Burkina Faso, has just been published in the Geophysical Research Letters journal.

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Seismic hazards reassessed in the Andes

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Although being able to predict the date on which the next big earthquake will occur is still some way off becoming a reality, it is now possible to identify the areas where they will occur. IRD researchers and their French, Ecuadorian and Peruvian partners have just measured the current deformation in the northern part of the Andes for the first time using GPS, where the tectonics of the Pacific and South American plates govern the high seismic activity in the region. The scientists then identified the areas where the fault, located at the interface of these two plates, is capable of generating large earthquakes or not.

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Sorghum and biodiversity

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

It is difficult to distinguish the human impact on the effects of natural factors on the evolution of crop plants. A Franco-Kenyan research team has managed to do just that for sorghum, one of the main cereals in Africa. The scientists demonstrated how three societies living on the slopes of Mount Kenya have shaped the geographic distribution and structure of the genetic diversity of local varieties. Because of their practices for selecting and exchanging crop seeds for harvesting, the farmers in each ethnic group maintain varieties which are unique to them. These prove to be genetically and phenotypically differentiated, despite their close geographical proximity. This study sheds light on the debate on the ownership and redistribution of benefits from genetic resources.

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Robotics to combat slimy pest

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

One hundred years after they arrived in a sack of grain, white Italian snails are the target of beleaguered South Australian farmers who have joined forces with University of Sydney robotics experts to eradicate the gastropods.

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New technology could help make deforested land fertile once again

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

A new technology being developed by Wake Forest researchers could help reverse the devastating effects of deforestation and mining on the world’s largest rainforest.

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U.S. unprepared for housing needs of aging population

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

America’s older population is experiencing unprecedented growth, but the country is not prepared to meet the housing needs of this aging group, concludes a new report released today by Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies and the AARP Foundation. According to "Housing America’s Older Adults—Meeting the Needs of an Aging Population," the number of people in the United States aged 50 and over is expected to grow to 133 million by 2030, an increase of more than 70 percent since 2000 (click to view interactive map). But housing that is affordable, physically accessible, well-located, and coordinated with supports and services is in too-short supply.

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Best way to train farm dogs has lessons for all dog training

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Dogs provided with the best living conditions and kinder training methods are giving the best results in the workplace, according to a new study of farm dogs from the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Veterinary Science.

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Separate studies suggest current "pause" in global warming likely the last

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

(Phys.org) —Two different research groups working independently have come to the same conclusion, the current pause we’ve experienced in global warming (since 1997) is very likely the last we’re likely to see if current greenhouse gas emission trends continue. One team, with members from several research centers in Japan, has published their findings in the journal Nature Climate Change. The other, based at the University of New South Wales, in Australia, has published their findings in Geophysical Research Letters.

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AMD’s new eight-core FX chips based on aging Piledriver architecture

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Advanced Micro Devices is targeting mid-range desktops with its latest high-end FX chips based on the Piledriver architecture. The three new FX processors each have eight cores. They chips are designed for home PC builders looking to make their own desktops for just under US$1,000 to as much as $1,500.[ Keep up on the day's tech news headlines with InfoWorld's Today's Headlines: Wrap Up newsletter. ]

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Bits Blog: Uber Service Banned Across Germany by Frankfurt Court

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The injunction will stand until the court holds a hearing later this year. Uber said it would continue to operate in Germany despite the threat of criminal charges and fines.

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Africa’s farmers face failed seasons

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

African farmers face ‘failed seasons’ risk as a result of being overwhelmed by climate change, warns a status report on the continent’s agriculture.

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Plant life forms in the fossil record: When did the first canopy flowers appear?

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Most plant fossils are isolated organs, making it difficult to reconstruct the type of plant life or its ecosystem structure. In their study for GEOLOGY, published online on 28 Aug. 2014, researchers Camilla Crifò and colleagues used leaf vein density, a trait visible on leaf compression fossils, to document the occurrence of stratified forests with a canopy dominated by flowering plants.

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Less is more in lap of luxury

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Chandeliers, gold taps and ornate drapes are classic hallmarks of the world’s most luxurious hotels, right? Wrong, according to Flinders University sociologist Eduardo de la Fuente.

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Famous Feynman lectures put online with free access

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

(Phys.org) —Back in the early sixties, physicist Richard Feynman gave a series of lectures on physics to first year students at Caltech—those lectures were subsequently put into print and made into text books, authored by Feynman, Robert Leighton and Matthew Sands—and now they’ve been formatted for the web and put online with free access for anyone who chooses to experience them. Titled, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, they have been divided into three volumes: "mainly mechanics, radiation and heat," "mainly electromagnetism and matter" and "quantum mechanics."

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Migrating birds sprint in spring, but take things easy in autumn

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Passerine birds, also known as perching birds, that migrate by night tend to fly faster in spring than they do in autumn to reach their destinations. This seasonal difference in flight speed is especially noticeable among birds that only make short migratory flights, says researcher Cecilia Nilsson of Lund University in Sweden, in Springer’s journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.

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Nano-forests to reveal secrets of cells

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Vertical nanowires could be used for detailed studies of what happens on the surface of cells. The findings are important for pharmaceuticals research, among other applications. A group of researchers from Lund University in Sweden have managed to make artificial cell membranes form across a large number of vertical nanowires, known as a ‘nano-forest’.

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How to protect yourself in the cloud

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

After the celebrity leaks, what can you do to safeguard your photos?

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Migratory fish scale to new heights

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

WA scientists are the first to observe and document juvenile trout minnow (Galaxias truttaceus Valenciennes 1846) successfully negotiating a vertical weir wall by modifying their swimming technique to ‘climb’ and ‘jump’ over the obstacle during their upstream migration to freshwater habitats.

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Computer simulations visualize ion flux

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Ion channels are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes throughout the human body. A young team of researchers led by pharmacologist Anna Stary-Weinzinger from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Vienna investigated how ion flux through a voltage gated sodium ion channel works in detail. Since this process is incredibly fast (up to 100 million ions per seconds), computer simulations were performed to visualize sodium flux "in slow motion". The time consuming calculations were performed using the high performance computer cluster (VSC), which is currently the fastest computer in Austria. Recently, the results were published in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Frequent fire and drying climate threaten WA plants

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Murdoch University fire ecology experts have warned that in Western Australia’s drying climate, many of the plant species which contribute to the stunning wildflower displays north of Perth may need 50 per cent longer between fires to maintain stable populations.

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Neutron diffraction sheds light on photosynthesis

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Scientists from ILL and CEA-Grenoble have improved our understanding of the way plants evolved to take advantage of sunlight. Using cold neutron diffraction, they analysed the structure of thylakoid lipids found in plant leaves where photosynthesis takes place. These light-sensitive membranes cover an enormous surface area, with several hectares being present in every square metre of leaf.

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Windows 8′s uptake climbs but still trails Vista’s

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Windows 8′s uptake came unstuck last month and shoved into a forward gear for the first time since May, but the OS trailed Windows Vista’s tempo of six years ago, according to data published Monday. Web analytics firm Net Applications’ numbers for August put the combined user share of Windows 8 and 8.1 at 13.4 percent of the world’s desktop and notebook systems, an increase of nine-tenths of a percentage point from July. That gain was the first since May and the largest since April, and followed two straight months of declines — the first ever for the OS.

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Bits Blog: Uber Banned Across Germany by Frankfurt Court

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The injunction will stand until the court holds a hearing later this year. Uber said it would continue to operate in Germany despite the threat of criminal charges and fines.

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Tavurvur in Papua New Guinea is the latest volcano to watch

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Last week, the eyes of volcanologists – and presumably a few nervous pilots – were fixed on Iceland. But unexpectedly, the volcanic eruption that made headlines happened on the other side of the world, in Papua New Guinea.

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Apple will keep pushing for a sales ban on Samsung products

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Apple will appeal a judge’s order that denied its request for a sales ban on Samsung products that were found to infringe its patents. A jury in California decided in May that Samsung infringed three of Apple’s patents and awarded the iPhone maker $119.6 million in damages.

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Raven soars through first light and second run

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Raven, a Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) science demonstrator, successfully saw first light at the Subaru Telescope on the nights of May 13 and 14, 2014 and completed its second run during the nights of August 9 and 10, 2014. Developed by the Adaptive Optics Lab of the University of Victoria (UVic) in partnership with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the National Research Council of Canada (NRC Herzberg), and Tohoku University, Raven is the first MOAO science and technical demonstrator to be installed and tested on an 8 m class telescope. It marks a technological advance in the number of science targets available for adaptive optics; it uses measurements from multiple guide stars to provide corrections for atmospheric turbulence in any locations of the field of view of the telescope.

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Reconnaissance code on industrial software site points to watering hole attack

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Attackers have rigged the website of an industrial software firm with a sophisticated reconnaissance tool, possibly in preparation for attacks against companies from several industries.

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Does limiting the power of appliances save energy?

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Would banning high-power appliances actually save energy?

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Exceptionally well preserved insect fossils from the Rhone Valley

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

In Bavaria, the Tithonian Konservat-Lagerstätte of lithographic limestone is well known as a result of numerous discoveries of emblematic fossils from that area (for example, Archaeopteryx). Now, for the first time, researchers have found fossil insects in the French equivalent of these outcrops – discoveries which include a new species representing the oldest known water treader.

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Researchers find Asian camel crickets now common in US homes

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

With their long, spiky legs and their propensity for eating anything, including each other, camel crickets are the stuff of nightmares. And now research from North Carolina State University finds that non-native camel cricket species have spread into homes across the eastern United States.

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iOS 8: The 4 biggest opportunities (and challenges) for developers

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Now that Apple has scheduled a Sept. 9 event where many people expect to see a new iPhone, it’s likely that iOS 8 will be in the hands of users relatively soon.

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Three ways your personal photos are vulnerable to hackers

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Recent reports of celebrities having nude or risqué photos of themselves leaked online highlights the serious risk of hackers getting access to our personal pictures.

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Bits Blog: Uber Banned Across Germany by Frankfurt Court

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The injunction will stand until the court holds a hearing later this year. Uber said it would continue to operate in Germany despite the threat of criminal charges and fines.

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Titan’s subsurface reservoirs modify methane rainfall

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

(Phys.org) —The international Cassini mission has revealed hundreds of lakes and seas spread across the icy surface of Saturn’s moon Titan, mostly in its polar regions. These lakes are filled not with water but with hydrocarbons, a form of organic compound that is also found naturally on Earth and includes methane. While most of the liquid in the lakes is thought to be replenished by rainfall from clouds in the moon’s atmosphere, the cycling of liquid throughout Titan’s crust and atmosphere is still not well understood.

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Mum’s hormones could make female magpie chicks more adventurous

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Female magpies have been shown to be more adventurous than their male siblings, according to new research.

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Blowfly maggots provide physical evidence for forensic cases

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Estimation of the post mortem interval (PMI) is one of the most crucial matters in autopsies and entomological specimens have been widely used to determine PMI after 72 hours of death. This is done using the oldest blowfly larvae found and from the succession pattern of insects that colonize the dead remains. Thus, the use of blowflies in forensic cases are crucial.

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Greenhouse whitefly: Will the unwanted greenhouse whitefly make it in the wild?

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Greenhouses have improved the possibilities of invasion of greenhouse whitefly into the wild in the boreal region, new study finds. Genetic analysis sheds new light on the survival of whiteflies in Finland and helps to plan efficient pest management.

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Dot Earth Blog: The New Look of Smokers’ Litter

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The cigarettes may change, but for some smokers the habit of littering does not.

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Bits Blog: Getting a Clear Picture of a Computer Network’s Security

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

It may be impossible to keep hackers out of a computer network. But one company offers a way to monitor threats once they get through the firewall.

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A single molecule device for mobile phones

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

Researchers from the Delft University of Technology, Groningen University and the FOM Foundation have designed a single molecule which can act as a useful building block in nanometer-size circuits. They found that the molecule functions as a resonant tunneling device, an essential component in mobile phones and WiFi. In conventional semiconductor technology, these devices have a complicated design consisting of several layers of different materials. This is the first time that such a device has been realized on the smallest imaginable scale, thus providing an interesting option within the continuing down-scaling of electronic components by the conventional industry. The results are published online this week in Nature Nanotechnology.

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Bits Blog: San Francisco Exhales During ‘Burning Man Exodus’

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The event draws more than 50,000 people, many of whom are from the tech industry. And while they’re away, the city’s hard-to-get-into restaurants and bars aren’t so hard to get into.

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Uber banned across Germany by court

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

A court says the UberPop service must stop transporting passengers in Germany, but the American company refuses to suspend work.

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A cloud of uncertainty

Written By: admin - Sep• 03•14

The mystery about how leaked celebrity pictures were obtained

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How to lure tech talent with employee benefits, perks

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Companies are vying for IT talent, and they’re using benefits and perks to help attract the best and brightest. So what are IT pros looking for?

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CoreOS’s Rudder steers software-defined networking for Docker

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Credit: iStockphoto

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Sentinel system pictures Napa quake

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

First report from Europe’s new quake-watcher

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Uber banned across Germany by court

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

A court says the UberPop service must stop transporting passengers in Germany, but the American company refuses to suspend work.

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Sharks off the menu and on the tourist trail in Palau

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

In many places swimmers might prefer to avoid sharks, but wetsuit-clad tourists in Palau clamour to dive among the predators thanks to a pioneering conservation initiative that has made them one of the country’s main visitor attractions.

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FBI probes ‘Cloud’ celebrity leaks

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

The FBI looks into allegations that the online accounts of celebrities have been hacked, leading to intimate pictures being posted online.

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Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story. Now Northwestern University scientists have figured out an elegant way to stop a molecule from tumbling so that its potential for new applications can be harnessed: shine a single laser on a trapped molecule and it instantly cools to the temperature of outer space, stopping the rotation of the molecule.

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Russian sex geckos die in orbit

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Five gecko lizards sent into orbit on a Russian space satellite as part of a sex experiment have all died, the Russian space agency says.

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Court halts ridesharing service Uber in Germany

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

A court has issued an injunction barring ridesharing service Uber from operating in Germany, the latest shot in a fight with the country’s taxi drivers.

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Top South America hackers rattle Peru’s Cabinet

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

The Peruvian hackers have broken into military, police, and other sensitive government networks in Argentina, Colombia, Chile, Venezuela and Peru, defacing websites and extracting sensitive data to strut their programming prowess and make political points.

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Great Barrier Reef dredge dumping plan could be shelved

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

An India-backed mining consortium could shelve controversial plans to dump dredging waste in the Great Barrier Reef, with alternative sites on land being considered amid growing environmental concerns, Australia said Tuesday.

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Japan space agency unveils asteroid hunting probe

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Japanese space scientists have unveiled the asteroid hunting space probe they hope to launch later this year on a mission to mine a celestial body.

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Apple’s shadow looms large at Berlin electronics show

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Berlin’s gigantic IFA consumer electronics fair opens this week, with the shadow of Apple looming large even if the iconic US brand traditionally snubs the event.

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WSU ‘deadly force’ lab finds racial disparities in shootings

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Participants in an innovative Washington State University study of deadly force were more likely to feel threatened in scenarios involving black people. But when it came time to shoot, participants were biased in favor of black suspects, taking longer to pull the trigger against them than against armed white or Hispanic suspects.

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Uber banned across Germany by court

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

A Frankfurt court tells car pick-up service Uber to stop taking passengers or face a fine because it lacks permits to operate in Germany.

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FBI says it’s addressing nude celebrity photos

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

The FBI says it is addressing allegations that nude photos of several female celebrities have been stolen and posted online.

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Has microfinance lost its moral compass?

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

The industry that provides financial services for people on low-incomes and without access to traditional banking services is morally reprehensible according to new research from The University of Manchester.

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One of world’s earliest Christian charms found

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

(Phys.org) —A 1,500 year-old papyrus fragment found in The University of Manchester’s John Rylands Library has been identified as one the world’s earliest surviving Christian charms.

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Brainy, Yes, but Far From Handy

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Robots still lack a critical element that will keep them from eclipsing most human capabilities anytime soon: a well-developed sense of touch.

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Brainy, Yes, but Far From Handy

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Robots still lack a critical element that will keep them from eclipsing most human capabilities anytime soon: a well-developed sense of touch.

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The key to drilling wells with staying power in the developing world

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

A UNC study found that if local water communities collect fees for repairs and train community members to fix the wells, they can remain in use for decades.

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Cannabis withdrawal symptoms common among adolescents treated for substance use disorder

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Although cannabis — commonly known as marijuana — is broadly believed to be nonaddictive, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators found that 40 percent of cannabis-using adolescents receiving outpatient treatment for substance use disorder reported experiencing symptoms of withdrawal, which are considered a hallmark of drug dependence.

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WSU ‘deadly force’ lab finds racial disparities in shootings

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Participants in an innovative Washington State University study of deadly force were more likely to feel threatened in scenarios involving black people. But when it came time to shoot, participants were biased in favor of black suspects, taking longer to pull the trigger against them than against armed white or Hispanic suspects.

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New physics department opens in the UK

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

University of Lincoln expands as interest in physics grows

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FBI probes ‘Cloud’ celebrity leaks

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

The FBI looks into allegations that the online accounts of celebrities have been hacked, leading to intimate pictures being posted online.

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How corals stir up their world

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Corals stir up the water, creating vortices that draw in nutrients and drive away waste, research reveals.

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Dot Earth Blog: The Role of Social Media in Wiping Out Passenger Pigeons, and Conserving Species Now

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Social media helped push the passenger pigeon to extinction. Now they may help forestall some species’ vanishing.

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Dot Earth Blog: The Role of Social Media in Wiping Out Passenger Pigeons, and Conserving Species Now

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Social media helped push the passenger pigeon to extinction. Now they may help forestall some species’ vanishing.

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If 2 New Yorkers Shared a Cab …

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

A team of mathematicians and engineers has calculated that if taxi riders were willing to share a cab, New York City could reduce the current fleet of 13,500 taxis up to 40 percent.

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Vacuum cleaner debate hots up

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Don’t get suckered, Mr Vacuum Cleaner tells people trying to beat new EU rules.

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Brainy, Yes, but Far From Handy

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Robots still lack a critical element that will keep them from eclipsing most human capabilities anytime soon: a well-developed sense of touch.

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Can geeks rescue science education?

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Would you take your kids to a geek festival?

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Windows XP: Your upgrade experiences

Written By: admin - Sep• 02•14

Readers share their experiences of replacing their operating system

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