Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Renal denervation more successful when it includes accessory arteries

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Renal denervation seems to be more successful at reducing blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension when it includes accessory renal arteries, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr. Linda Schmiedel from Germany.

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Wine only protects against CVD in people who exercise

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Wine only protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) in people who exercise, according to results from the In Vino Veritas study presented at ESC Congress today by professor Milos Taborsky from the Czech Republic.

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Drinking tea reduces non-CV mortality by 24 percent

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Drinking tea reduces non-cardiovascular mortality by 24 percent, reveals a study in 131,000 people presented at ESC Congress today by professor Nicolas Danchin from France.

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New method predicts optimal number and location of AEDs

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

A new method to predict the optimal number and location of automated external defibrillators was presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Benjamin Dahan from France. According to the predictive method, Paris needs 350 AEDs located in public places for optimal prevention of out of hospital cardiac arrest.

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Local anesthetic for TAVI as safe and effective as general anesthetic

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Local anesthetic is as safe and effective for transcatheter aortic valve implantation as general anesthetic, according to results of the FRANCE 2 registry presented at the European Society for Cardiology Congress today by Dr Romain Chopard from France.

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Retrievable transcatheter aortic valve effective and safe in real world setting

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

A retrievable and repositionable transcatheter aortic valve is effective and safe in a real world setting, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2014 today by Dr Stylianos Pyxaras from Germany. The direct flow medical transcatheter aortic valve has unique features that improve operator control and has the potential to improve transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

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Batteryless cardiac pacemaker is based on automatic wristwatch

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

A new batteryless cardiac pacemaker based on an automatic wristwatch and powered by heart motion was presented at ESC Congress 2014 today by Adrian Zurbuchen from Switzerland. The prototype device does not require battery replacement.

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AF mortality and morbidity high at 1 year despite good anticoagulant use

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Mortality and morbidity of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients remains high at one year despite good use of oral anticoagulants, according to the one year follow-up of the Atrial Fibrillation General Pilot Registry. The findings were presented for the first time at ESC Congress 2014 today by registry chairperson professor Gregory Lip.

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DealBook: Top Bitcoin Proponent to Plead Guilty to Federal Charge

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Charles Shrem, a leading backer of Bitcoin, is to plead to one federal count of aiding and abetting an unlicensed money transmitting business.

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End-of-Life Talks May Finally Overcome Politics

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Medicare may cover advance care planning that was once decried as “death panels,” and some private insurers are not waiting for the political process.

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Hal Finney, Cryptographer and Bitcoin Pioneer, Dies at 58

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Mr. Finney made advancing online privacy his life’s work, and he took part in the first Bitcoin transaction, when Satoshi Nakamoto sent him 10 Bitcoins.

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Power Up: E-Sports Set Video Gamers Fighting for Real Money in Virtual Contests

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Professional video gaming is becoming a worldwide spectator sport offering big prizes to competitors, helping the game industry gain even greater cultural and economic clout.

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Bits Digital Diary: On Instagram’s Hyperlapse, and Fast-Forwarding to the Future

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Instagram’s new tool for capturing time-lapse video could provide a new prism through which people view and present themselves to the world.

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Bits Blog: Lyft Says Uber’s Recruitment Efforts Are Hurting Drivers

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

In instances when Uber ambassadors take rides to recruit Lyft drivers, those Lyft drivers experience a considerable drop in pay, according to company data.

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Bits Blog: Apple Appeals Judge’s Decision to Deny a Ban on Samsung Products

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

The smartphone giants Apple and Samsung have agreed to drop patent suits against each other outside the United States, but their fight here clearly isn’t over.

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Q&A: How to Manage Google Location Tracking

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Plus, writing about yourself on Wikipedia.

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Pilot sites in energy from coffee waste show good results

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

Latin America produces around 70 percent of the world’s coffee, but there is a hidden price we have to pay in threats to clean environments and community health. Coffee production generates a great amount of wastewater, which is released untreated into rivers, affecting aquatic fauna and flora and downstream communities. A key problem is that coffee wastewater comes along with tons of organic waste and high toxicity, which affects the soil and generates greenhouse-gas emissions, particularly methane. An international push to address the health and environmental problems caused by coffee wastewater may now turn out to be a milestone in tackling the issue, with Central American farmers using coffee wastewater to generate energy.

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New Novartis Drug Shows Striking Efficacy in Treating Heart Failure

Written By: admin - Aug• 31•14

The drug reduced the risk of dying from cardiovascular causes and the risk of being hospitalized for worsening heart failure by about 20 percent in a large trial.

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EPA staff says agency needs to be tough on smog

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The Environmental Protection Agency’s staff concludes that the government needs to tighten smog rules by somewhere between 7 and 20 percent.

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China’s Alibaba plans IPO for week of September 8

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba plans to hold its initial public offering on the US stock market the week of September 8, the Wall Street Journal reported Saturday, citing a person familiar with the matter.

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PAX Prime gaming convention kicks off in Seattle

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The Penny Arcade Expo is in full swing in downtown Seattle.

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Tablet sales slow as PCs find footing

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Tablets won’t eclipse personal computers as fast as once thought, according to studies by market tracker International Data Corporation (IDC).

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Startups offer banking for smartphone users

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The latest banks are small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. Startups, such as Moven and Simple, offer banking that’s designed specifically for smartphones, enabling users to track their spending on the go. Some things haven’t changed. Like traditional banks, customers open a checking account, get a debit card and are able to make check deposits and pay their bills. Like many Internet banks before them, they have no maintenance or overdraft fees, there are no physical branches and depositing cash is a challenge. What makes Moven and Simple different is their apps. Every time a debit card is swiped at a store, a notification is sent to the phone letting the user know how much was spent and how much money is left in the account.

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Leave that iguana in the jungle, expert tells Costa Rica

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Thousands of parrots, monkeys, iguanas, toucans, turtles and other rainforest animals are kept as exotic pets in Costa Rica, a practice putting some species at risk, according to experts.

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Factor in naked mole rat’s cells enhances protein integrity

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Scientists at the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, part of the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, have found another secret of longevity in the tissues of the longest-lived rodent, the naked mole rat.

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First comprehensive ESC Guidelines on aortic diseases published

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The first comprehensive ESC Guidelines on aortic diseases are published today. They are presented at ESC Congress 2014 by Task Force Chairpersons professor Raimund Erbel and professor Victor Aboyans.

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First recommendations on all new oral anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism published

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The first recommendations on the use of all new oral anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism are published today in new ESC Guidelines. The guidelines are launched at ESC Congress by professors Stavros V. Konstantinides and Adam Torbicki.

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Sudden death predictor identifies ICD candidates in new ESC Guidelines

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A new sudden death predictor for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy identifies candidates for implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in ESC Guidelines published today. They are presented at ESC Congress by Task Force Chairperson professor Perry Elliott.

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ESC/EACTS revascularization guidelines stress benefit of revascularization in stable CAD

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The therapeutic benefit of revascularization in coronary artery disease (CAD) is emphasised in the 2014 ESC/EACTS revascularization guidelines presented at ESC Congress by joint Task Force Chairs professor Stephan Windecker of the European Society of Cardiology and professor Philippe Kolh of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery.

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World Briefing: Central America Hit by Severe Drought

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A severe drought has ravaged crops in Central America, and as many as 2.8 million people are struggling to feed themselves, the United Nations World Food Program said Friday.

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Pleiades distance debate resolved, say radio astronomers

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

New study contradicts controversial Hipparcos analysis

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Leadership and Calm Are Urged in Outbreak

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Leadership and help from Western nations are needed to eradicate the virus in West Africa, said pioneers in the fights against smallpox, polio and other diseases.

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Chief Executive of Rovio, Maker of Angry Birds Game, to Step Down

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The move by Mikael Hed comes as the Finnish company struggles to respond to an increasing trend toward so-called freemium games.

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Mouse on lily tops photo competition

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Animal nightlife – and other great natural images from ecology photo contest

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Quarantine for Ebola Lifted in Liberia Slum

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The president of Liberia had rejected the advice of Ebola experts in quarantining the West Point neighborhood, a move that resulted in deadly clashes.

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Swirls of Dust and Drama, Punctuating Life in the Southwest

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Children, drivers and other residents have learned how to prepare for huge dust storms, sometimes called haboobs, that can turn day into night in seconds.

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Iceland’s volcano ash alert lifted

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

An eruption near Iceland’s Bardarbunga volcano that briefly threatened air travel has ended, local officials say.

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Bits Blog: Apple Appeals Judge’s Decision to Deny a Ban on Samsung Products

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The smartphone giants Apple and Samsung have agreed to drop patent suits against each other outside the United States, but their fight here clearly isn’t over.

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Bits Digital Diary: On Instagram’s Hyperlapse, and Fast-Forwarding to the Future

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Instagram’s new tool for capturing time-lapse video could provide a new prism through which people view and present themselves to the world.

Read more here

Bits Blog: Lyft Says Uber’s Recruitment Efforts Are Hurting Drivers

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

In instances when Uber ambassadors take rides to recruit Lyft drivers, those Lyft drivers experience a considerable drop in pay, according to company data.

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DealBook: To Compete Against Alibaba, Wanda Joins Forces With Baidu and Tencent

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Dalian Wanda, the Chinese conglomerate controlled by the billionaire Wang Jianlin, announced it would enter the e-commerce industry in an $800 million partnership with two of China’s biggest Internet companies.

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Bits Blog: Apple Appeals Judge’s Decision to Deny a Ban on Samsung Products

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The smartphone giants Apple and Samsung have agreed to drop patent suits against each other outside the United States, but their fight here clearly isn’t over.

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Bits Blog: On Instagram’s Hyperlapse, and Fast-Forwarding to the Future

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Instagram’s new tool for capturing time-lapse video could provide a new prism through which people view and present themselves to the world.

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FIXD tells car drivers via smartphone what is wrong

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A key source of anxiety while driving solo, when even a bothersome back-seat driver’s comments would have made you listen: the "check engine" light is on but you do not feel, smell or see anything wrong. What to do? Rush to the repair shop or try your luck and make it all the way home? FIXD, a plug-in sensor and phone app, wants to give you the answers by sending information to your phone when problems arise. A summary of the problem is provided in simple terms. Drivers are also told the consequences of continued driving. The driver is told the severity of the problem and provides instructions on what to do. The system even offers an estimate of the repair costs that the problem would involve. "We want to take the guess work out of maintaining your car," said the FIXD team in a promotional video. "We want to give you confidence when dealing with repair shops."

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DealBook: To Compete Against Alibaba, Wanda Joins Forces With Baidu and Tencent

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Dalian Wanda, the Chinese conglomerate controlled by the billionaire Wang Jianlin, announced it would enter the e-commerce industry in an $800 million partnership with two of China’s biggest Internet companies.

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Bits Blog: Questions for IBM’s Watson

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

IBM’s Watson keeps adding new features. But can it make money?

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Facebook tuning mobile search at social network

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Facebook on Friday said it is dabbling with letting members using smartphones or tablets search for past posts of friends at the leading online social network.

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Court won’t restore Oracle’s $1.3B verdict vs. SAP

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A federal appeals court is refusing Oracle Corp.’s request to reinstate a $1.3 billion verdict it won against German rival SAP SE in a long-running copyright dispute.

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Bits Blog: Google Joins Amazon in Dreams of Drone Delivery

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Who needs UPS trucks and bicycle delivery when you can fly in things people buy online?

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Appeals court denies Oracle request to restore $1.3 billion judgment against SAP

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Oracle has failed to persuade a federal appeals court to restore US$1.3 billion judgment in its copyright-infringement lawsuit against SAP, but will have the options of taking a lesser amount of money or pursuing a new trial.

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Team pioneers strategy for creating new materials

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn’t always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory combined two different approaches at two different facilities to synthesize new materials.

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Shell files new plan to drill in Arctic

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Royal Dutch Shell has submitted a new plan for drilling in the Arctic offshore Alaska, more than one year after halting its program following several embarrassing mishaps.

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Study Says ZMapp Works Against Ebola

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

All 18 monkeys exposed to a lethal dose of the virus and given the experimental drug survived, raising hopes that ZMapp will work in people.

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Bits Blog: Apple Appeals Judge’s Decision to Deny a Ban on Samsung Products

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The smartphone giants Apple and Samsung have agreed to drop patent suits against each other outside the United States, but their fight here clearly isn’t over.

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Bits Blog: Questions for IBM’s Watson

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

IBM’s Watson keeps adding new features. But can it make money?

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Bits | State of the Art: Uber and Lyft Have Become Indistinguishable Commodities

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Though Uber and Lyft have become bitter enemies recently, in many places, they both offer ubiquitous, cheap and mostly high-quality service.

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Digital Divide: Inequality and Web Search: Q. and A. With Google Researchers

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Two researchers responded to readers’ comments and questions about a recent column on the different search patterns in richer and poorer areas.

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Aging Africa

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

In the September issue of GSA Today, Paul Bierman of the University of Vermont–Burlington and colleagues present a cosmogenic view of erosion, relief generation, and the age of faulting in southernmost Africa. By measuring beryllium-10 (10Be) in river sediment samples, they show that south-central South Africa is eroding at the slow rate of about five meters per million years, consistent with rates in other non-tectonically active regions.

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MSN Messenger to end after 15 years

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Microsoft’s MSN Messenger will be switched off in China in October, bringing a final end to the 15-year-old service.

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Team defines new biodiversity metric

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

To understand how the repeated climatic shifts over the last 120,000 years may have influenced today’s patterns of genetic diversity, a team of researchers led by City College of New York biologist Dr. Ana Carnaval developed a new biodiversity metric called "phylogeographic endemism."

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Mysteries of space dust revealed

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA’s Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks open a door to studying the origins of the solar system and possibly the origin of life itself.

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NASA animation shows Hurricane Marie winding down

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

NOAA’s GOES-West satellite keeps a continuous eye on the Eastern Pacific and has been covering Hurricane Marie since birth. NASA’s GOES Project uses NOAA data and creates animations and did so to show the end of Hurricane Marie.

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Use of ‘language of deceit’ betrays scientific fraud

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Distinguishing scientific papers known to be fraudulent from those that contain genuine results can be done simply by comparing the writing styles

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NASA sees Hurricane Cristobal racing through North Atlantic

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Satellite imagery shows Hurricane Cristobal racing through the North Atlantic on Friday, August 29 while losing its tropical characteristics. An image from NOAA’s GOES-East satellite showed Cristobal headed south of Greenland. The previous day, NASA’s TRMM satellite saw heavy rainfall occurring in the hurricane.

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Sharing Everything: Is Owning Overrated? The Rental Economy Rises

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Entrepreneurs say the new way of consuming is part of a growing, post-recession movement to value experiences over possessions.

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Reducing water scarcity possible by 2050

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Water scarcity is not a problem just for the developing world. In California, legislators are currently proposing a $7.5 billion emergency water plan to their voters; and U.S. federal officials last year warned residents of Arizona and Nevada that they could face cuts in Colorado River water deliveries in 2016.

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Intel amps up desktop performance with its first 8-core PC chip

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Intel is shipping its fastest PC processor to date and its first with eight cores. The Core i7-5960X Extreme Edition chip, announced Friday, is aimed at gaming and high-performance desktops. It is based on the Haswell microarchitecture, which is the basis for Intel’s latest Core chips, and priced at $999 per chip in 1,000-unit quantities.

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Step lightly: All-optical transistor triggered by single photon promises advances in quantum applications

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

(Phys.org) —Optical transistors and switches are fundamental in both classical and quantum optical information processing. A key objective in optics research is determining and developing the structural and performance limits of such all-optical devices, in which a single gate photon modifies the transmission or phase accumulation of multiple source photons – a feature necessitating strong interaction between individual photons. While significant progress has been made – especially in cavity QED experiments, which use resonators to enhance interaction between photons, confined in a reflective enclosure, and natural or artificial atoms – the goal is to achieve high optical gain and high efficiency using a free-space – that is, cavity-free – approach. Recently, scientists at Universität Stuttgart, Germany demonstrated a free-space single-photon transistor based on two-color Rydberg interaction, which they say could lead to a high optical gain, high efficiency optical transistor through further improvements. (In a Rydberg atom a single electron is excited to a state with a large principle quantum number, meaning that it has high potential energy.) Moreover, the researchers state that the finding may lead to advances in quantum information processing, condensed matter physics, single step multi-photon entanglement, and other important areas.

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After Xen and KVM, meet a new Linux hypervisor: Jailhouse

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

In the world of hypervisors for Linux, a couple of names have come to the fore over time: Xen and KVM.

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Q&A: Don’t Judge Them by Their Shells

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

They look different, but the difference in nutritional value between the different-colored eggs is negligible.

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Soviet dog spacesuit for pooches with the right stuff

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Your canine companion can strut its stuff in this authentic Soviet spacesuit, worn by genuine doggy heroes of the space race Belka and Strelka

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China’s reform of R&D budget management doesn’t go far enough, research shows

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

In almost 20 years, China’s R&D expenditure as a percentage of its gross domestic product has more than tripled, reaching 1.98 per cent in 2012. This figure surpasses the 28 member states of the EU, which collectively managed 1.96 per cent.

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Scientists solve ‘sliding rocks’ puzzle

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Scientists have finally worked out how rocks on a dry lake bed in California move across the ground.

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Bits Blog: Looking to the Future of Data Science

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The future of data science lies beyond the big-data focus on predictions and recommendations, according to Oren Etzioni, a leading computer scientist.

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DealBook: To Compete Against Alibaba, Wanda Joins Forces With Baidu and Tencent

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Dalian Wanda, the Chinese conglomerate controlled by the billionaire Wang Jianlin, announced it would enter the e-commerce industry in an $800 million partnership with two of China’s biggest Internet companies.

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Danish museum discovers unique gift from Charles Darwin

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The Natural History Museum of Denmark recently discovered a unique gift from one of the greatest-ever scientists. In 1854, Charles Darwin – father of the theory of evolution – sent a gift to his Danish colleague Japetus Steenstrup, director of the Royal Museum of Natural History. Until very recently, no one at the museum knew that it possessed a piece of scientific history of this calibre. Just a few weeks ago, the head of exhibitions was studying the correspondence between Steenstrup and Darwin as part of her search for objects to include in an upcoming exhibition. She started to suspect a treasure lay hidden somewhere, and soon a hunt was launched among the museum’s 14 million objects.

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Managing coasts under threat from climate change and sea-level rise

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Coastal regions under threat from climate change and sea-level rise need to tackle the more immediate threats of human-led and other non-climatic changes, according to a team of international scientists.

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Emailing angry? Your keyboard feels your pain

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

By measuring the way you are typing, a computer program can detect how you are feeling with 80 per cent accuracy

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Watching others play video games is the new spectator sport

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

As the UK’s largest gaming festival, Insomnia, wrapped up its latest event on August 25, I watched a short piece of BBC Breakfast news reporting from the festival. The reporter and some of the interviewees appeared baffled at the huge popularity of "videogame livestreaming", otherwise known as gamers watching other gamers playing games.

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CryptoWall held over half a million computers hostage, encrypted 5 billion files

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A file-encrypting ransomware program called CryptoWall infected over 600,000 computer systems in the past six months and held 5 billion files hostage, garnering more than $1 million for its creators , researchers found. The Counter Threat Unit (CTU) at Dell SecureWorks performed an extensive analysis of CryptoWall that involved gathering data from its command-and-control (C&C) servers, tracking its variants and distribution methods and counting payments made by victims so far.

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DOE ‘Knowledgebase’ links biologists, computer scientists to solve energy, environmental issues

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

If biologists wanted to determine the likely way a particular gene variant might increase a plant’s yield for producing biofuels, they used to have to track down several databases and cross-reference them using complex computer code. The process would take months, especially if they weren’t familiar with the computer programming necessary to analyze the data.

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Mirror-image forms of corannulene molecules could lead to exciting new possibilities in nanotechnology

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Corannulene is a bowl-shaped polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon with a skeleton of bonded carbon atoms equivalent to a segment of the buckminsterfullerene or ‘buckyball’—a soccer-ball-like structure of 60 carbon atoms. This similarity to the buckyball has led to corannulene being dubbed the ‘buckybowl’. Chemists are interested in the chemical potential of corannulenes as catalysts and in nanotechnology applications, but exploring the potential of these molecules is complicated because they invert rapidly between their mirror-image or ‘chiral’ forms (Fig. 1).

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DealBook: To Compete Against Alibaba, Dalian Joins Forces With Baidu and Tencent

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Dalian Wanda, the Chinese conglomerate controlled by the billionaire Wang Jianlin, announced it would enter the e-commerce industry in an $800 million partnership with two of China’s biggest Internet companies.

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‘K-to-M’ histone mutations: How repressing the repressors may drive tissue-specific cancers

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

In a cell’s nucleus, chromosomal DNA is tightly bound to structural proteins known as histones, an amalgam biologists call chromatin. Until about two decades ago, histones were regarded as a nuclear "sidekick," the mere packing material around which the glamorous DNA strands were wrapped. Recently, however, biologists have developed a greater appreciation for how DNA/histone interactions govern gene expression.

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Beautiful spiral cracks could be a feature, not a flaw

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Unusually uniform, watercolour-like fractures that form in high-tech materials could be used to manufacture micro-patterned surfaces

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Chief Executive of Rovio, Maker of Angry Birds Game, to Step Down

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The move by Mikael Hed comes as the Finnish company struggles to respond to an increasing trend toward so-called freemium games.

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The unifying framework of symmetry reveals properties of a broad range of physical systems

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Symmetry is one of the most fundamental concepts in nature, and it can give rise to profound and wide-reaching physical effects. A one-dimensional wire, for example, has a different symmetry and very different mechanical properties to those of a two-dimensional sheet of the same material. Tomoya Hayata and Yoshimasa Hidaka from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science have now studied the consequences of breaking symmetry for various systems found in nature, providing a powerful, general framework to describe the link between properties and symmetries.

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Tricorder XPRIZE: 10 teams advance in global competition to develop consumer-focused diagnostic device

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

XPRIZE today announced the 10 finalist teams competing for the $10M Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE, a 3.5-year global competition sponsored by the Qualcomm Foundation for teams to develop a consumer-focused, mobile device capable of diagnosing and interpreting a set of 15 medical conditions and capturing five vital health metrics. Launched in January 2012, the competition encourages the development of a device much like the medical Tricorder of Star Trek fame, moving it from science fiction to science reality.

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Wetlands not ‘wetting’ enough for invertebrates

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Perth’s southern wetlands are steadily drying and prolonged dry spells in the future will threaten the survival of their invertebrate fauna populations, research suggests.

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Plug n’ Play protein crystals

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Almost a hundred years ago in 1929 Linus Pauling presented the famous Pauling’s Rules to describe the principles governing the structure of complex ionic crystals. These rules essentially describe how the arrangement of atoms in a crystal is critically dependent on the size of the atoms, their charge and type of bonding. According to scientists from the Biohybrid Materials Group of Aalto University Finland led by Mauri Kostiainen similar rules can be applied to prepare ionic colloidal crystals consisting of oppositely charged proteins and virus particles. The results can be applied for example in packing and protecting virus particles into crystals that mimic nature’s own occlusion bodies (protein lattices that pack and protect virus particles to maintain their long-term infectivity), preparation of biocompatible metamaterials, biomolecule crystallization and the subsequent structural analysis.

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Should Microsoft kill Windows Phone?

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

It’s been nearly four years since Microsoft first released Windows Phone, and what it has gotten after many millions of dollars in development and marketing costs, plus its $7.2 billion acquisition of Nokia, is this: a worldwide smartphone market share of less than 3 percent. And that number has been going down, not up.

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Nintendo launching ‘amiibo’ with 12 characters

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Pikachu and Link will be among the first characters coming to "amiibo."

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Bacterial communication considered for medical applications

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A local microbiologist has been working on an alternative to antibiotics, which tend to encourage resistant bacterial strains to develop over time.

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A guide to the 2014 Neptune opposition season

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Never seen Neptune? Now is a good time to try, as the outermost ice giant world reaches opposition this weekend at 14:00 Universal Time (UT) or 10:00 AM EDT on Friday, August 29th. This means that the distant world lies "opposite" to the Sun as seen from our Earthly perspective and rises to the east as the Sun sets to the west, riding high in the sky across the local meridian near midnight.

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Researchers identify a pheromone in the urine of male tilapia fish that stimulates spawning in females

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The exchange of chemical signals between organisms is considered the oldest form of communication. Acting as messenger molecules, pheromones regulate social interactions between conspecifics, for example, the sexual attraction between males and females. Fish rely on pheromones to trigger social responses and to coordinate reproductive behavior in males and females. Scientists at the Marine Science Center at the University of the Algarve in Faro, Portugal, and at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now identified such a signal molecule in the urine of male Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus): this pheromone boosts hormone production and accelerates oocyte maturation in reproductive females. Hence, the Mozambique tilapia is one of the first fish species in which the chemical structure of a pheromone has been identified and the biological basis of its activity elucidated.

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What time is it in the universe?

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Flavor Flav knows what time it is. At least he does for Flavor Flav. Even with all his moving and accelerating, with the planet, the solar system, getting on planes, taking elevators, and perhaps even some light jogging. In the immortal words of Kool Moe Dee. Do you know what time it is?

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Researchers suggest lack of published null result papers skews reliability of those that are published

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

(Phys.org) —A trio of researchers at Stanford University has shined a light on a problem many in the social science research arena are aware of but tend to ignore: the problem of null result papers not being written or published. In their paper published in the journal Science, Annie Franco, Neil Malhotra and Gabor Simonovits suggest that not publishing null result papers produces a bias in the literature, skewing the reliability of papers with strong results that are published. Jeffery Mervis offers an In Depth piece on the team’s work in the same journal edition.

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Thermonuclear X-ray bursts on neutron stars set speed record

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A new study of thermonuclear X-ray bursts on neutron stars reveals that, on very rare occasions, shells can be expelled at relativistic speeds – up to 30% of the speed of light. These velocities are the highest ever measured for a cosmic thermonuclear event, including novae and thermonuclear supernovae. This phenomenon, discovered in only 0.1 second worth of data in 40 years of space-based X-ray astronomy, sheds new light on how nuclear flames spread over surfaces of neutron stars. The research results have been published in Astronomy & Astrophysics.

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How can we find tiny particles in exoplanet atmospheres?

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

It may seem like magic, but astronomers have worked out a scheme that will allow them to detect and measure particles ten times smaller than the width of a human hair, even at many light-years distance.  They can do this by observing a blue tint in the light from far-off objects caused by the way in which small particles, no more than a micron in size (one-thousandth of a millimeter) scatter light.

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Hydrogen powers important nitrogen-transforming bacteria

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are key players in the natural nitrogen cycle on Earth and in biological wastewater treatment plants. For decades, these specialist bacteria were thought to depend on nitrite as their source of energy. An international team of scientists led by Holger Daims, a microbiologist at the University of Vienna, has now shown that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria can use hydrogen as an alternative source of energy. The oxidation of hydrogen with oxygen enables their growth independent of nitrite and a lifestyle outside the nitrogen cycle. The study is published in the current issue of the journal Science.

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