Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Apple chief: ‘I’m proud to be gay’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Apple chief executive Tim Cook has publicly acknowledged his sexuality, saying he wants to try to help people struggling with their identity.

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An unmanned rocket exploded. So what?

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Sputnik was launched more than 50 years ago. Since then we have seen missions launched to Mercury, Mars and to all the planets within the solar system. We have sent a dozen men to the moon and many more to the International Space Station, along with a significant complement of female astronauts. Our communications, banking, television, security and transport sectors rely on satellites orbiting the Earth.

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Tim Cook, Apple’s Chief Executive, Says He Is ‘Proud to Be Gay’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Mr. Cook becomes the most prominent executive of a public company to come out.

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Genes play a key part in the recipe for a happy country

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Why are the Danes naturally more cheerful than the Brits, and why are we in turn more upbeat than the French? Research presented as part of this year’s ESRC Festival of Social Sciences shows us that the recipe behind a happy nation includes a list of ingredients – including increased equality, a fair and just welfare state, and trustworthy institutions and politicians – but specific genetic factors can have a significant effect.

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Speed boost for 4G in some cities

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Two of the UK’s mobile operators are turning on technology that boosts mobile speeds in a few UK cities.

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Formula could shed light on global climate change

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Wright State University researchers have discovered a formula that accurately predicts the rate at which soil develops from the surface to the underlying rock, a breakthrough that could answer questions about greenhouse gases and has potential applications in agriculture.

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Reading on screens is different – does it matter?

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

We’re beginning to understand how digital devices affect literacy – but don’t assume that paper is always better than screens

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NASA image: Sunrise from the International Space Station

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman posted this image of a sunrise, captured from the International Space Station, to social media on Oct. 29, 2014. Wiseman wrote, "Not every day is easy. Yesterday was a tough one. #sunrise"

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Asteroid Apophis could experience landslides when it passes near Earth

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

(Phys.org) —A team of space scientists with members from the U.S., China and France has found via computer modeling that an asteroid due to pass close to Earth in 2029 is likely to experience minor landslides. In their paper published in the journal Icarus, the researchers describe the data they input into their model and what the simulation showed.

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Green technology saves energy and boosts profits, productivity in factories

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Switching to LED lights in factories not only saves energy, it boosts productivity and increases profits, a new study shows.

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Apple chief: ‘I’m proud to be gay’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Apple chief executive Tim Cook has publicly acknowledged his sexuality, saying he wants to try to help people struggling with their identity.

Read more here

Fighting the global water scarcity issue

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

According to the World Water Management Institute, over one-third of the human population is affected by water scarcity. If nothing is done to prevent it, an estimated 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions with absolute water scarcity by 2025. Thankfully, due to bio-mimicry and advancements in physics, water filtration and desalination technologies have been growing and improving.

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Planetary atmospheres a key to assessing possibilities for life

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A planetary atmosphere is a delicate thing. On Earth, we are familiar with the ozone hole—a tear in our upper atmosphere caused by human-created chemicals that thin away the ozone. Threats to an atmosphere, however, can also come from natural causes.

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Cell division, minus the cells

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

(Phys.org) —The process of cell division is central to life. The last stage, when two daughter cells split from each other, has fascinated scientists since the dawn of cell biology in the Victorian era. For just as long, it has been notoriously difficult to study this final step, when the dividing cell creates a furrow before cleaving in two.

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Many Interacting Worlds theory: Scientists propose existence and interaction of parallel worlds

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Griffith University academics are challenging the foundations of quantum science with a radical new theory based on the existence of, and interactions between, parallel universes.

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Game technology can make emergency robots easier to control

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A method borrowed from video gaming can make remote-controlled emergency response robots easier to use – enabling the operator to focus more on the dangerous situations they face.

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Scientist creates automatic birdsong recognition app

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Dr Dan Stowell, an EPSRC Research Fellow in QMUL’s School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has used a grant from Queen Mary Innovation to develop a prototype for an app that turns his research into bird call recognition. Working with his co-founder Florence Wilkinson, Dr Stowell created Warblr and they have now set up a Kickstarter to get to the next stage and launch the app publicly.

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First Swedish hard-rock diamonds discovered

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

An Uppsala-led research group has presented the first verified discovery of diamonds in Swedish bedrock. The diamonds are small, but provide important clues to the geological evolution of rocks.

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High-quality drug testing helps protect the integrity of California horse racing

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

With big names like California Chrome, Bayern and Shared Belief taking the field for the Breeder’s Cup Classic on Nov. 1, it’s a safe bet that drug testing in American horse racing will be an ongoing topic.

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New research reveals fish are smarter than we thought

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

(Phys.org) —A new study from researchers in our Department of Psychology with colleagues at Queen Mary University of London has reported the first evidence that fish are able to process multiple objects simultaneously.

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A low-density planet that won’t stick to a schedule

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

(Phys.org) —For their latest discovery, Yale astronomers and the Planet Hunter program have found a low-mass, low-density planet with a punctuality problem.

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NIST launches new calibration service for high-power lasers

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has launched a new calibration service for high-power lasers of the sort used by manufacturers for applications such as cutting and welding metals, as well as by the military for more specialized applications like defusing unexploded land mines.

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Tim Cook, Apple’s C.E.O., Says He Is Proud to Be Gay

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The public declaration by the chief of Apple, in an essay written for Bloomberg Businessweek, makes Mr. Cook the highest-profile C.E.O. to come out.

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Strategies for seeking serendipity and how to support them in digital information environments

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Research carried out by Lecturer in Information Interaction in City University London’s Department of Computer Science, Dr Stephnn Makri suggests that serendipity is more than a ‘happy accident.’ Though it cannot be directly controlled, it can indeed be influenced. He also maintains that creative people who follow a variety of strategies can make their own luck by ‘seeking’ serendipity.

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Lenovo wraps up purchase of Motorola phone unit

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Lenovo Group announced the completion of its acquisition of Motorola Mobility from Google Inc. on Thursday in a move aimed at making the Chinese computer maker a global smartphone brand.

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Tim Cook: ‘I’m proud to be gay’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Apple CEO Tim Cook says he’s proud to be gay.

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Prophet’s ancient seal provides insights from antiquity

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

When a personal artifact of a religious leader is discovered nearly 1,700 years after its use, the object provides invaluable historical insights. Zsuzsanna Gulacsi, professor of Comparative Cultural Studies, has been studying an ancient crystal seal used by prophet Mani, to provide new interpretations and prepare the seal for further research.

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Exploring the value of ‘Energy Star’ homes

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The numbers in neat columns tell—column by column, page by page—a story spread out across Carmen Carrión-Flores’ desk at Binghamton University. It’s a great story, she says; she just doesn’t know how it ends. Yet.

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Dam hard: Water storage is a historic headache for Australia

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The agricultural green paper released last week proposes 27 new water and irrigation projects, which the government claims will be necessary for Australia’s agricultural expansion. The emphasis is firmly on dams, with federal agriculture minister Barnaby Joyce arguing that "water is wealth and stored water is a bank".

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Technology is changing the face of northern Australian cattle farming

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Farming cattle in northern Australia can be tough, especially in times of drought, but producers are increasingly turning to digital technologies to help them look after their herds.

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Lab breakthrough can lead to cheaper biofuels, improved crops, and new products from plants

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

(Phys.org) —Imagine being able to precisely control specific tissues of a plant to enhance desired traits without affecting the plant’s overall function. Thus a rubber tree could be manipulated to produce more natural latex. Trees grown for wood could be made with higher lignin content, making for stronger yet lighter-weight lumber. Crops could be altered so that only the leaves and certain other tissues had more wax, thus enhancing the plant’s drought tolerance, while its roots and other functions were unaffected.

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Supernova shock waves create glowing arcs across sky

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A forest of mysterious radiation arcs seen across our view of the universe might be down to a supernova-powered bubble expanding towards our sun

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Gold origami exerts strange power over light

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Sheets of gold one nanoparticle thick have been folded into tiny origami. Dubbed plasmene, the material has some of the weirdest optical properties around

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Threat of Lawsuit Could Test Maine’s Quarantine Policy

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Kaci Hickox, a nurse who treated Ebola patients in Africa, said she would go to court if she is not freed by Thursday, heightening a debate on how to balance public health and public fears.

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Seeing dinosaur feathers in a new light

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Why were dinosaurs covered in a cloak of feathers long before the early bird species Archaeopteryx first attempted flight? Researchers from the University of Bonn and the University of Göttingen attempt to answer precisely that question in their article "Beyond the Rainbow" in the latest issue of the renowned journal Science. The research team postulates that these ancient lizards had a highly developed ability to discern color. Their hypothesis: The evolution of feathers made dinosaurs more colorful, which in turn had a profoundly positive impact on communication, the selection of mates and on dinosaurs’ procreation.

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Anthropology exposes how miners shape our world and our views of it

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Miners do much more than extract minerals and make profits. All over the world mining corporations are collaborating with governments, local populations and NGOs. Their logos, mottoes and CEOs seem to pervade the news media, including the social sections.

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Tim Cook: ‘I’m Proud to Be Gay’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Being gay, Apple’s chief executive wrote, has given him a deeper understanding of what it means to be in the minority.

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Like eating fish? It’s time to start caring where it comes from

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Australians love seafood. Whether it’s fish and chips by the seaside or prawns on the barbie at Christmas, it’s integral to many of our traditions and social gatherings. Yet very little of the seafood we consume is sustainable. For a country that has such a love affair with the ocean, I find this perplexing.

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‘Nanomotor lithography’ answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

(Phys.org) —What does it take to fabricate electronic and medical devices tinier than a fraction of a human hair? Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego recently invented a new method of lithography in which nanoscale robots swim over the surface of light-sensitive material to create complex surface patterns that form the sensors and electronics components on nanoscale devices. Their research, published recently in the journal Nature Communications, offers a simpler and more affordable alternative to the high cost and complexity of current state-of-the-art nanofabrication methods such as electron beam writing.

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Selling and buying water rights

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Trying to sell or buy water rights can be a complicated exercise. First, it takes time and effort for buyers and sellers to find each other, a process that often relies on word-of-mouth, local bulletin boards, even calling friends and neighbors to get the word out. Then they must deal with the maze of rules and regulations involved. Finally, they must reach a fair price.

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Greater inequality within UK and US than some developing countries, trade ‘footprint’ shows

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Australia, with a comparable level of international trade activity, still maintains greater internal equality than the trading nations that 42 percent of our consumption depends on. Only nine percent of countries that we trade with have more egalitarian economies.

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European Data Relay System on track

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The first component of Europe’s space data highway passed several critical tests this summer replicating the harsh launch and space conditions it will soon have to endure.

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Project will apply cognitive computing to uncover new patient treatment options

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

IBM today announced a new initiative to accelerate the adoption of genomic based medicine at Cleveland Clinic. Researchers at Cleveland Clinic will use IBM Watson technology in the area of genomic research to help oncologists deliver personalized medicine by uncovering new cancer treatment options for patients.

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New imaging technique leads to better understanding of freezing in plants

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Using a new technique to study an old problem, an Agricultural Research Service scientist in North Carolina has uncovered new details about what happens to a cereal plant when it freezes.

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Everyone can have an impact on the dynamics of a group, particularly if they join forces with others

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

How do we as individuals prompt our fellow humans to behave socially? This is one of the central questions relating to social dilemmas in game theory. Previous studies assumed that it is almost impossible to control cooperation in large groups. Nonetheless, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology have now demonstrated that each of us can exert an influence on the cooperative behaviour of others. However, the possibilities available to the individual are limited in this regard, particularly in the context of large groups. The researchers therefore also examined how group success is influenced when several like-minded members join forces. The mathematically calculated result corroborates experience: we can achieve more when we act together.

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New system would allow programmers to easily trade computational accuracy for energy savings

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

As transistors get smaller, they also grow less reliable. Increasing their operating voltage can help, but that means a corresponding increase in power consumption.

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Calculating encryption schemes’ theoretical security guarantees eases comparison, improvement

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Most modern cryptographic schemes rely on computational complexity for their security. In principle, they can be cracked, but that would take a prohibitively long time, even with enormous computational resources.

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Use asteroids as stepping stones to Mars: Richard Binzel on NASA’s asteroid redirect mission

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

By the end of this decade, NASA hopes to lasso a space rock: The space agency is actively pursuing proposals for its Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM)—a mission that aims to identify, capture, and redirect an asteroid into lunar orbit. Astronauts might then visit the rock to collect and bring back samples—pieces that would presumably hold remnants of the early solar system. ARM has been touted as a steppingstone toward the ultimate goal of sending humans to Mars: The mission would advance technologies and spaceflight experience needed for humans to colonize the Red Planet.

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Researchers discover way to coordinate different types of robots

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

(Phys.org) —Robots have great value in a wide variety of areas, and while robots acting alone can be helpful in collecting data, ones that "talk" to each other can yield endless potential. That’s especially true when the robots are of different types.

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Future air passengers may get unique, windowless view

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

A windowless airplane sounds like a claustrophobic nightmare. A windowless airplane with OLED displays, aura-enhanced with subtle cabin lighting from gently glowing walls could be quite something else. Using OLED (organic light emitting diode) technology, thin, bendable, lightweight display screens would blend with the fuselage and surfaces, such as seatbacks. Use of this concept would optimize space and reduce the weight of the aircraft.

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Burning passion: Chinese rich pay sky-high meteorite prices

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

One small cheque to a businessman, one giant leap for a meteorite: after journeys of millions of kilometres, rocks formed from the primordial soup of the solar system have landed on the walls of a Chinese showroom.

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Rocket makers probe US explosion

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The builders of an unmanned supply rocket which exploded on the way to the International Space Station have vowed to find the cause of the failure.

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Sistine chapel dazzles after technological makeover

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

High above the altar in the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel, the halo around Jesus Christ’s head in Michelangelo’s famous frescoes shines with a brighter glow, thanks to a revolutionary new lighting system.

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Baidu profit up 27 percent as mobile grows

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Chinese search engine Baidu Inc. said Thursday its quarterly profit rose 27 percent as user traffic for its mobile operation surpassed passed its desktop computer-based search business.

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93 percent of mining, oil and gas, logging, agriculture developments involve inhabited land

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

In an analysis of almost 73,000 concessions in eight tropical forested countries, more than 93 percent of these developments were found to involve land inhabited by Indigenous Peoples and local communities. According to the research, conducted by The Munden Project, the total amount of land handed over by governments to the private sector for mining, logging, oil & gas drilling, and large-scale agriculture includes at least 40 percent of Peru and 30 percent of Indonesia.

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Threat of Lawsuit Could Test Maine’s Quarantine Policy

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Kaci Hickox, a nurse who treated Ebola patients in Africa, said she would go to court if she is not freed by Thursday, heightening a debate on how to balance public health and public fears.

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Bayer raises forecasts for 2014 after strong Q3

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer, maker of Aspirin, said Thursday that it is raising its full-year profit targets after a strong third quarter.

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Billionaires’ $10m gift to Yale stirs debate in China

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

A Chinese billionaire couple’s $10 million gift to Yale University sparked controversy among the country’s Internet users Thursday, with some arguing that the money would be better spent on schools in China.

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Basics: Ebola and the Vast Viral Universe

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

By all evidence, researchers say, viruses like Ebola have been parasitizing living cells since the first cells arose on earth nearly four billion years ago. Some say that viruses actually invented cells.

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Gadgetwise: The Latest Flipboard Serves Up the News and Some Surprises

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The latest version of the Flipboard tablet magazine offers a staff-selected “front page” of stories and a wide range of extremely specialized topics.

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New species of frog in urban jungle

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Scientists confirm that a frog found living in New York City wetlands is a new species.

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Microsoft unveils fitness band

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Microsoft unveils a wearable device that can track a user’s sleep and exercise as well connect to a fitness tracking service on smartphones.

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Gadgetwise: The Latest Flipboard Serves Up the News and Some Surprises

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The latest version of the Flipboard tablet magazine offers a staff-selected “front page” of stories and a wide range of extremely specialized topics.

Read more here

Air quality and unconventional oil and gas sites

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Research suggesting air pollutants released by unconventional oil and gas production are well over recommended levels in the US is published today in the open access journal Environmental Health. High levels of benzene, hydrogen sulfide and formaldehyde were found. The study is the first to be based on community sampling by people who live near production sites and could be used to supplement official air-quality monitoring programs.

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Frailty increases kidney transplant recipients’ risk of dying prematurely

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Regardless of age, frailty is a strong risk factor for dying prematurely after a kidney transplant. The finding, which comes from a new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation, suggests that patients should be screened for frailty prior to kidney transplantation, and that those who are identified as frail should be closely monitored after the procedure.

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Microsoft unveils fitness band

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Microsoft unveils a wearable device that can track a user’s sleep and exercise as well connect to a fitness tracking service on smartphones.

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Microsoft Jumps Into the Growing Market for Wearable Fitness Technology

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Microsoft is joining the companies who see wearables as a way into the wellness business without all the red tape that comes from being a true medical company.

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Basics: Ebola and the Vast Viral Universe

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

By all evidence, researchers say, viruses like Ebola have been parasitizing living cells since the first cells arose on earth nearly four billion years ago. Some say that viruses actually invented cells.

Read more here

Reversing Course on Beavers

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Their dams were once obliterated by dynamite and bulldozers, but beavers are getting new respect these days as a defense against the withering impacts of a warmer and drier climate.

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In Liberia, a Good or Very Bad Sign: Empty Hospital Beds

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Liberia has far fewer people being treated for Ebola than anticipated, but health officials are hesitant to declare victory.

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After a Family Trip to Africa, a Connecticut Girl, 7, Is Unwelcome at School

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The Milford, Conn. student, Ikeoluwa Opayemi, has not been allowed at class since she returned from a 10-day trip to Nigeria.

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Threat of Lawsuit Could Test Maine’s Quarantine Policy

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The dispute is heightening a national debate over how to balance public health and public fears against the rights and freedoms of health care workers, and troops, returning from West Africa.

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Superconductor finally goes with the FFLO

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Unusual response to strong magnetic fields seen at long last

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Rocket makers probe US explosion

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The builders of an unmanned supply rocket which exploded on the way to the International Space Station have vowed to find the cause of the failure.

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Merchant Customer Exchange Says It May Adopt Apple Pay’s Technology

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

A group of retailers known as the Merchant Customer Exchange said that it could yet decide to use the technology that Apple Pay relies on to process transactions.

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Ebola Slowing in Liberia, W.H.O. Says, but International Support Is Still Necessary

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The World Health Organization’s assistant director general said there had been a decline in burials in the West African nation and no increases in confirmed cases.

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Samsung profit lowest in three years

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Samsung Electronics sees its quarterly operating profit fall to its lowest level in more than three years because of slowing smartphone sales.

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How will future city signs look?

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Jetpacks, driverless cars and solar roads

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Big firms ‘must condemn GamerGate’

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Games publishers must "stand-up and condemn" the movement referred to as "GamerGate", says a developer forced to leave her home due to threats.

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US theaters advised to ban ‘smart’ watches and glasses

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

A pair of influential US film industry organizations on Wednesday put out word that movie theaters should ban smart watches or eyewear that could be used to record movies.

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Debris revives hope of finding Amelia Earhart plane

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Researchers on the trail of missing 1930s aviatrix Amelia Earhart say they are increasingly convinced that aluminum debris found on a South Pacific beach came from her lost airplane.

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IBM dips into Twitter stream for business insights

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Twitter on Wednesday announced a partnership to let computing powerhouse IBM dip into the public stream of tweets to provide businesses with insights for making decisions.

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Through 3D-printed prosthetic, Illinois students lending a hand in Ecuador

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

For most amputees, the road to a more fun recreactional prosthetic device is slow and costly. However, thanks to a student-led research group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, that might be changing, which is especially good news for those who are most in need, residents of the developing world.

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Koala chlamydia vaccine raises hope

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Australian scientists say they have successfully tested a vaccine aimed at protecting wild koalas from chlamydia.

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Machine Learning: Bluetooth Improvements Appear in More Devices

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

An update made in 2010, also called Bluetooth 4.0, uses less power and has better pairing capability.

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Bits Blog: IBM Teams Up With Twitter to Give Business a Gauge Powered by Social Media

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The partnership seeks to harness Twitter messages as a way for businesses to make decisions based on real-time trends among the social network’s users.

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Bits Blog: Unpacking the F.C.C.’s Online Video Proposal

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

A blog post by the commission’s chairman about expanding the definition of cable operator to include online video distributors seemed to raise as many questions as it answered.

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Dot Earth Blog: Building Sustainable Energy Access, from the Outside In

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

How much energy access in poor places can come from off and on the grid — and with or without big greenhouse-gas contributions?

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Bits Blog: Reddit Opens a Crowdfunding Site

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

An initiative from the popular online community site could potentially turn into a revenue stream.

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Critic’s Notebook: The Terror of Alien: Isolation and the Evil Within

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

It’s good to be scared: Simple, pleasing terror returns in Alien: Isolation, The Evil Within and P. T.

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State of the Art: Looking for a Design Behind Amazon’s Devices

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The overall strategy behind the retailer’s hardware lineup appears puzzling; its devices sound fantastic in theory, but often fall short in reality.

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Running robots of future may learn from world’s best two-legged runners—birds

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

With an eye toward making better running robots, researchers have made surprising new findings about some of nature’s most energy efficient bipeds – running birds.

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Russian rocket engines suspected in launch blast

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Crews searched for scorched wreckage along the Virginia coast Wednesday in hopes of determining why an unmanned commercial rocket exploded in a blow to NASA’s strategy of using private companies to send supplies and, eventually, astronauts to the International Space Station.

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What is Orbital Sciences?

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

NASA pays it billions. Its rockets sport mythical names like Minotaur and Pegasus. And its $2 billion deal to resupply the International Space Station had gone well—until this week.

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Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Bigger is better, if you’re a leatherback sea turtle.

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Apple Pay rival defends service

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

A mobile payment service backed by Wal-Mart, Best Buy and other leading retailers is defending its practice of prohibiting its members from accepting alternatives such as Apple Pay.

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Apple in talks to sell iPhone in Iran: report

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

Apple is in preliminary talks to sell the iPhone in Iran, if sanctions are eased on the Middle East nation, the Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.

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Technology provides improved access for disabled voters

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

A University of Florida researcher’s desire to provide citizens with disabilities the same opportunity to vote as everyone else could serve as the catalyst for revolutionizing voter access nationwide.

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‘Treasure in saliva’ may reveal deadly diseases early enough to treat them

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing—at an early stage—diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases.

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Rocket explosion cause sought in US

Written By: admin - Oct• 30•14

The builders of an unmanned supply rocket which exploded on the way to the International Space Station have vowed to find the cause of the failure.

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