Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

E.U. Greenhouse Gas Deal Falls Short of Expectations

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The varied energy needs and capacity of member nations led to concessions and compromises that experts say watered down an agreement that was hoped to pressure other countries at climate talks in 2015.

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Bellevue Back on Front Line in Another Crisis

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Bellevue Hospital Center has long been on the front line of global health crises. But rising to the challenge of New York City’s first Ebola case may be one of its biggest tests.

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The Met and Other Museums Adapt to the Digital Age

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Once reluctant to accept the virtual world, institutions are now using interactivity, 3-D imaging and “augmented reality” in displays.

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Baffling ballet

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Unravelling the flocking habits of starlings

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Doctor in New York City Is Sick With Ebola

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Dr. Craig Spencer, who returned from Guinea last week, remains in isolation at Bellevue Hospital Center. Authorities are tracing anyone who might have come into contact with him recently.

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Cuomo and Christie Order Strict Ebola Quarantines

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York and Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey said all people who had direct contact with Ebola patients in three West African nations would be quarantined.

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Bits Blog: Nest Buys Revolv, Maker of Smart Appliance Manager

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Recently, Nest has been delving deeper into integrating its products with other smart devices.

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UAE fires up space agency with Mars mission

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Country plan to send spacecraft to "red planet" by 2021

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Spain defends Canaries oil drilling plan

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Spain on Friday launched a legal challenge to defend plans to explore for oil and gas off the Canary Islands, a popular tourist destination.

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US official: Auto safety agency under review

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized by lawmakers and safety advocates for not acting aggressively enough regarding millions of vehicles with defective air bags or faulty ignition switches.

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Out-of-patience investors sell off Amazon

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos’ invest-and-expand strategy flooded into the stock as the company revolutionized shopping, upended the book industry and took on the cloud—even though its vast range of initiatives ate up all the company’s profits.

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Ebola.com domain sold for big payout

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The owners of the website Ebola.com have scored a big payday with the outbreak of the epidemic, selling the domain for more than $200,000 in cash and stock.

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Lava from Hawaii volcano picks up speed

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A growing stream of lava threatening homes on Hawaii’s Big Island is expanding and speeding up as it heads toward a small rural town.

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Google exec makes record skydive from edge of space

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A Google executive set a new record Friday by jumping successfully from near the top of the stratosphere—some 135,000 feet, or 41,000 meters high, his project website said.

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Warning coloration paved the way for louder, more complex calls in certain species of poisonous frogs

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Frogs are well-known for being among the loudest amphibians, but new research indicates that the development of this trait followed another: bright coloration. Scientists have found that the telltale colors of some poisonous frog species established them as an unappetizing option for would-be predators before the frogs evolved their elaborate songs. As a result, these initial warning signals allowed different species to diversify their calls over time.

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Google boss sets new skydive record

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Google executive Alan Eustace breaks the world altitude record for a parachute jump set two years ago by Felix Baumgartner.

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Climate change caused by ocean, not just atmosphere, study finds

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Most of the concerns about climate change have focused on the amount of greenhouse gases that have been released into the atmosphere.

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New study finds options for climate change policy are well characterized

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Policy options for climate change risk management are straightforward and have well understood strengths and weaknesses, according to a new study by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Policy Program.

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Law of the Sea authorizes animal tagging research without nations’ consent

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Many marine animals are world travelers, and scientists who study and track them can rarely predict through which nations’ territorial waters their paths will lead.

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Hinode satellite captures X-ray footage of solar eclipse

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The moon passed between the Earth and the sun on Thursday, Oct. 23. While avid stargazers in North America looked up to watch the spectacle, the best vantage point was several hundred miles above the North Pole.

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New ‘Surveyman’ software promises to revolutionize survey design and accuracy

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Doctoral student Emma Tosch of University of Massachusetts Amherst School of Computer Science won a Best Paper award this week at the premier international computer programming language design conference in Portland, Ore., for her work on "Surveyman," a first-of-its-kind software system for designing, deploying and automatically debugging surveys to improve their accuracy and trustworthiness.

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NASA identifies ice cloud above cruising altitude on Titan

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

NASA scientists have identified an unexpected high-altitude methane ice cloud on Saturn’s moon Titan that is similar to exotic clouds found far above Earth’s poles.

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Alan Eustace Jumps From Stratosphere, Breaking Felix Baumgartner’s World Record

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A helium-filled balloon lifted Alan Eustace, a Google executive, to more than 25 miles above the earth. Fifteen minutes after he cut himself loose, he was on the ground.

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Alan Eustace Jumps From Stratosphere, Breaking Felix Baumgartner’s World Record

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A helium-filled balloon lifted Alan Eustace, a Google executive, to more than 25 miles above the earth. Fifteen minutes after he cut himself loose, he was on the ground.

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DealBook: Roku, Video Streaming Service, Is Said to Consider I.P.O.

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Founded in 2002, Roku has become one of the most popular makers of set-top boxes that let consumers stream Internet video onto their TVs.

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New York and New Jersey Tighten Ebola Screenings at Airports

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York and Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey said all people who had direct contact with Ebola patients in three West African nations would be quarantined.

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DealBook: Roku, Video Streaming Service, Is Said to Consider I.P.O.

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Founded in 2002, Roku has become one of the most popular makers of set-top boxes that let consumers stream Internet video onto their TVs.

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F.C.C. Delays Auction of TV Airwaves for Mobile Use

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A lawsuit challenging the sale said that the commission’s initial rules would cause some stations to lose some of their coverage area and viewers.

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Dot Earth Blog: Why Americans Should Fear Fear of Ebola More than the Virus

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Two vital efforts to tamp down unfounded fears of Ebola contagion.

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Profiles in Science: The Malaria Fighter

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Although he does nothing to court publicity, many call Rear Adm. Timothy Ziemer one of the most effective leaders in public health.

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Bits Blog: Mark Zuckerberg, Speaking Mandarin, Tries to Win Over China for Facebook

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

At a forum at Tsinghua University in Beijing, Facebook’s chief executive discussed his thoughts on the company’s future in the country and why he is studying Chinese.

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Home Solar Power Discounts Are Worker Perk in New Program

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Conceived at the World Wildlife Fund, the initiative uses bulk purchasing power to allow for discounts on home systems.

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Hacker gets prison for cyberattack stealing $9.4M

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

An Estonian man who pleaded guilty to orchestrating a 2008 cyberattack on a credit card processing company that enabled hackers to steal $9.4 million has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta.

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A Billionaire’s $65 Million Gift to Theoretical Physics

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Charles T. Munger, a longtime business partner of Warren Buffett, is donating $65 million to the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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Pragmatism on Climate Change Trumps Politics at Local Level Across U.S.

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Even as politicians at the national level steer clear of the politically charged topic, officials who live where its effects lap at residents’ doorsteps are embracing the issue.

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Remains of French ship being reassembled in Texas

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A frigate carrying French colonists to the New World that sank in a storm off the Texas coast more than 300 years ago is being reassembled into a display that archeologists hope will let people walk over the hull and feel like they are on the ship’s deck.

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Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Spectacular eruptions at Bárðarbunga volcano in central Iceland have been spewing lava continuously since Aug. 31. Massive amounts of erupting lava are connected to the destruction of supercontinents and dramatic changes in climate and ecosystems.

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Magic Leap moves beyond older lines of VR

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Two messages from Magic Leap: Most of us know that a world with dragons and unicorns, elves and fairies is just a better world. The other message: Technology can be mindboggingly awesome. When the two messages combine, the company’s aura becomes evident as movers in newer realms of augmented reality. The people behind this Florida-based company believe that the future of computing should be derived from respecting human biology, physiology, creativity, and community. So why, they ask, can’t computing feel completely natural? Why can’t computing and technology bend to us, to our experience? Describing their technology, they said "our team dug deep into the physics of the visual world, and dug deep into the physics and processes of our visual and sensory perception." They created what they call a Dynamic Digitized Lightfield Signal, which is biomimetic. That is the core and they added hardware, software, sensors, core processors, and, they said, "a few things that just need to remain a mystery." On their site page for developers, they said, "Using our Dynamic Digitized Lightfield Signal, imagine being able to generate images indistinguishable from real objects and then being able to place those images seamlessly into the real world."

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Alan Eustace Jumps From Stratosphere, Breaking Felix Baumgartner’s World Record

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A helium-filled balloon lifted Mr. Eustace, a Google executive, to 135,908 feet. Fifteen minutes after he cut himself loose using a small explosive device, he was on the ground.

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Alan Eustace Jumps From Stratosphere, Breaking Felix Baumgartner’s World Record

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A helium-filled balloon lifted Mr. Eustace to 135,908 feet. Fifteen minutes after he cut himself loose using a small explosive device, he was on the ground.

Read more here

A Billionaire’s $65 Million Gift to Theoretical Physics

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Charles T. Munger, a longtime business partner of Warren Buffett, is donating $65 million to the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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Hailo says Uber blocked investors

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

After pulling out of the US, taxi app Hailo complains that rival Uber is blocking potential investors from offering funding.

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Beyond GoPro: Skiers and snowboarders can measure everything with apps, hardware

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

At the end of a long day on the slopes, there’s only one reward as sweet as a cold beer and a fireplace to warm your toes – recounting your epic moves through the powder.

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Officials Tracing New York Ebola Patient’s Movements, While Reassuring a Wary City

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

With much of the public’s concern focused on the movements of New York City’s first Ebola patient, doctors treating the man were discussing using experimental treatments to help him battle the virus.

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Q&A: Shining a Light on Nosy Apps

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Plus, creating a fund-raising page on Facebook.

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NBCUniversal settles with unpaid interns for $6.4M

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

NBCUniversal will pay $6.4 million to settle a class action lawsuit brought by unpaid interns who worked on "Saturday Night Live" and other shows who claim they are owed wages, according to court documents.

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Asteroid miners to launch first private space telescope

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Private company Planetary Resources, which one day hopes to mine asteroids, is preparing to launch a prototype of a telescope designed to find them

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Dark Souls II named game of the year

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

DayZ, Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft and Assassins Creed are also among the winners.

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New social network for teenagers experiences a growth spurt

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The millionaire creator of a Facebook competitor for teenagers, Pascal Lorne needed, well, teenagers.

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Team infuses science into ‘Minecraft’ modification

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The 3-D world of the popular "Minecraft" video game just became more entertaining, perilous and educational, thanks to a comprehensive code modification kit, "Polycraft World," created by University of Texas at Dallas professors, students and alumni.

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Climate change impacts countered by stricter fisheries management

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A new study has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Niño, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.

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States ascend into the cloud

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Seven years ago, the state of Delaware started moving computer servers out of closets and from under workers’ desks to create a consolidated data center and a virtual computing climate.

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Dot Earth Blog: Another Round on Energy Rebound

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Two analysts of energy trends expand on their view that efficiency’s climate and energy benefits have been overstated.

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Europe postpones launch of first ‘space plane’

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Europe said Friday it was postponing the launch next month of its first-ever "space plane" to give scientists time to finetune the mission’s flight plan.

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Ambitious EU targets for renewable energies make economic sense

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The European heads of governments are currently in Brussels negotiating the targets for the European climate and energy policy for the year 2030. There seems to be a fundamental consensus for tightening the binding climate target. Yet, there are still significant differences of opinion as to the further development of the target for renewable energies: How far should the share of renewable energies in total energy consumption be increased by 2030? And should renewables targets also be specified for individual member states or only for the EU overall?

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Startups should seek quality—not quantity—in partnerships, study finds

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

When partnering with larger companies, startups with a small number of carefully chosen alliances will reap the most benefits, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.

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Satellite catches lingering remnants of Tropical Depression 9

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

NOAA’s GOES-East satellite has been keeping an eye on the remnants of Tropical Depression 9.

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Li-ion batteries contain toxic halogens, but environmentally friendly alternatives exist

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Physics researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University have discovered that most of the electrolytes used in lithium-ion batteries—commonly found in consumer electronic devices—are superhalogens, and that the vast majority of these electrolytes contain toxic halogens.

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NASA sees Tropical Storm Ana still vigorous

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

NASA’s TRMM satellite saw that Tropical Storm Ana was still generating moderate rainfall is it pulled away from Hawaii. The next day, NASA’s Aqua satellite saw that wind shear was having an effect on the storm as it moved over open ocean.

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Can Whisper, an app for anonymous confessions, protect users’ identities?

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Can an app that people anonymously share confessions on, some of which become fodder for news stories, protect the users’ identities? That’s the issue surrounding Whisper this week.

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Bits Blog: Malicious Ebola-Themed Emails Are on the Rise

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Criminals are attempting to install malicious programs on computers using false Ebola advisories as bait.

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Autumnwatch returns to Leighton Moss

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Stags, starlings and more turn out for Autumnwatch

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Officials Tracing New York Ebola Patient’s Movements, While Reassuring a Wary City

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

With much of the public’s concern focused on the movements of New York City’s first Ebola patient, doctors treating the man were discussing using experimental treatments to help him battle the virus.

Read more here

Officials Tracing New York Ebola Patient’s Movements, While Reassuring a Wary City

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

With much of the public’s concern focused on the movements of New York City’s first Ebola patient, doctors treating the man were discussing using experimental treatments to help him battle the virus.

Read more here

Slumdog mapmakers fill in the urban blanks

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The Missing Maps initiative aims to chart slums around the world as a way of fighting disease outbreaks and hastening development

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Apple to open 25 new stores in China in the next two years

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Tim Cook is in China this week, where he announced plans to open 25 new Apple stores in its Greater China region in the next two years.

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Molecular beacons shine light on how cells ‘crawl’

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Adherent cells, the kind that form the architecture of all multi-cellular organisms, are mechanically engineered with precise forces that allow them to move around and stick to things. Proteins called integrin receptors act like little hands and feet to pull these cells across a surface or to anchor them in place. When groups of these cells are put into a petri dish with a variety of substrates they can sense the differences in the surfaces and they will "crawl" toward the stiffest one they can find.

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Scifi short promotes comet mission

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The European Space Agency releases a short scifi movie to promote its audacious bid to land on a comet next month.

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Cat dentals fill you with dread?

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A survey published this year found that over 50% of final year veterinary students in the UK do not feel confident either in discussing orodental problems with clients or in performing a detailed examination of the oral cavity of their small animal patients. Once in practice, things don’t always improve and, anecdotally, it seems many vets dread feline dental procedures.

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Yelp adds hotel and winery bookings with new partnerships

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Travelers often turn to Yelp to check out consumer reviews of hotels before they go on vacation, and now they can book a room directly through its site and app thanks to a partnership with startup Hipmunk.

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Powerful new software plug-in detects bugs in spreadsheets

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

An effective new data-debugging software tool dubbed "CheckCell" was released to the public this week in a presentation by University of Massachusetts Amherst computer science doctoral student Daniel Barowy. He spoke at the premier international computer programming language design conference known as OOPSLA, in Portland, Ore.

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Officials Tracing New York Ebola Patient’s Movements, While Reassuring a Wary City

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

With much of the public’s concern focused on the movements of New York City’s first Ebola patient, doctors treating the man were discussing using experimental treatments to help him battle the virus.

Read more here

Students win challenge for real-time traffic app

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Three University of Texas at Arlington Computer Science and Engineering students have won a $10,000 prize in the NTx Apps Challenge for a smart traffic light network that adjusts traffic light schedules to make traffic flow more efficient.

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Flatland, we hardly knew ye: Unique 1-D metasurface acts as polarized beam splitter, allows novel form of holography

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

(Phys.org) —Traditional three-dimensional (3-D) plasmonic metamaterials with metallic structures – artificial materials that exploit coherent delocalized electron oscillations known as surface plasmons produced from the interaction of light with metal-dielectric materials – exhibit unique electromagnetic properties not found in natural materials, such as extraordinary transmission beyond the diffraction limit, efficient light-harvesting ability, plasmonic color filtering, and the ability to control the reflection or transmission direction of a light beam. However, they are difficult to fabricate, have a narrow usable bandwidth due to their resonant character, and exhibit low optical efficiency due to the inherent metal absorption. While two-dimensional metasurface structures have been proposed in an attempt to address these functional limitations, they still require complex designs and sophisticated fabrication procedures.

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Mycologist promotes agarikon as a possibility to counter growing antibiotic resistance

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

(Phys.org) —Mycologist Paul Stamets is espousing the health benefits of agarikon, a fungus that grows on trees in old growth forests in North America and Europe. He’s written and published a blog piece in the Huffington Post, describing the known antibacterial and antiviral abilities of the fungus and suggesting we take better care of our old growth forests as a means of survival in an uncertain future.

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Comet stinks of rotten eggs and cat wee, finds Rosetta

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Data from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta probe reveals that eau de comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko smells awful – but that’s good news

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New oscillator for low-power implantable transcievers

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Arash Moradi and Mohamad Sawan from Polytechnique Montreal in Canada discuss their new low-power VCO design for medical implants. This oscillator was implemented to provide the frequency deviation of frequency-shift-keying (FSK) modulation in implantable radio-frequency (RF) transceivers.

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Researchers increase the switching contrast of an all-optical flip-flop

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York have increased the switching contrast of a particular kind of all-optical flip-flop by 28 dB, resulting in a switching contrast of 36.6 dB. This could provide a huge leap in the performances of a range of photonic techniques, such as all-optical packet switching, all-optical label addressing, and square-wave clock generation, as well as other photonic devices housing semiconductor optical amplifiers or even passive nonlinear media.

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New insights on the origin of the triple asteroid system (87) Sylvia

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Combining observations from the world’s largest telescopes with those from smaller instruments used by amateur astronomers, a team of scientists has discovered that the large main-belt asteroid (87) Sylvia has a complex interior. This has been deduced by using the motions of the two moons orbiting the main asteroid as probes of the object’s density distribution. The complex structure is probably linked to the way the multiple system was formed.

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Should the Japanese give nuclear power another chance?

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

On September 9, 2014, the Japan Times reported an increasing number of suicides coming from the survivors of the March 2011 disaster. In Minami Soma Hospital, which is located 23 km away from the power plant, the number of patients experiencing stress has also increased since the disaster. What’s more, many of the survivors are now jobless and therefore facing an uncertain future.

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A Billionaire’s $65 Million Gift to Theoretical Physics

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Charles T. Munger, a longtime business partner of Warren Buffett, is donating $65 million to the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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First transplant of ‘dead’ heart

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Surgeons in Australia say they have performed the first heart transplant using a "dead heart".

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Study shows no lead pollution in oilsands region

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

New research from a world-renowned soil and water expert at the University of Alberta reveals that there’s no atmospheric lead pollution in Alberta’s oilsands region—a finding that contradicts current scientific knowledge.

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How can we help endangered vultures?

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Zoologists from the School of Natural Sciences at Trinity College Dublin are proposing an ingenious idea to help conserve populations of African white-backed vultures. The iconic birds, which play a critical role in sustaining healthy ecosystems, may need to dine for free in human-staffed ‘vulture restaurants’ if they are to survive spells of food scarcity in Swaziland and neighbouring countries. 

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The Queen sends her first tweet

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The Queen sends her first tweet to launch the London Science Museum’s ambitious new Information Age gallery.

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Continental formation more complicated than previously understood

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

(Phys.org) —The way continents are formed can be far more complicated than previously understood, according to researchers at the University of Aberdeen.

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Researcher to map lead contamination in New South Wales’ drinking water

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Preliminary research indicates excessive levels of lead and other metal contamination in New South Wales’ household drinking water, with various locations across the state found to contain up to 20 times the amount of lead recommended by the Australian Drinking Water Guideline.

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Scientists work to save endangered desert mammal

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Amargosa voles, small rodents that inhabit rare marshes of the Mojave Desert, have faced dire circumstances in recent years. Loss of habitat, extreme drought and climate change brought this subspecies of the California vole to near extinction, leaving only a few hundred clinging to existence. It is now one of the most critically endangered mammals in North America. But the vole’s luck may be changing with the birth of the first pups from a new captive breeding program at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

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ESA image: Mumbai acquired by ALOS

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The western Indian city of Mumbai is pictured in this image from Japan’s ALOS satellite.

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Online anonymity isn’t as easy as the firms offering privacy apps want you to think

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

In a post-Snowden world, anonymity is what people want online. Smartphone apps offering anonymous messaging are popping up everywhere – Secret, Whisper and now Yik Yak. The latest additions to privacy-protecting technology, they claim to provide anonymous, location-based confession, expression, and discussion platforms.

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Ancient human bone reveals when we bred with Neanderthals

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

When a human bone was found on a gravelly riverbank by a bone-carver who was searching for mammoth ivory, little did he know it would provide the oldest modern-human genome yet sequenced. The anatomically modern male thigh-bone, found near the town of Ust’-Ishim in south-western Siberia, has been radiocarbon-dated to around 45,000 years old.

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New compounds for the manufacture of tunable OLED devices

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

The research groups of Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis and Photovoltaic and Optoelectronic Devices at the Universitat Jaume I, UJI, have developed new organic compounds characterized by a higher modularity, stability and efficiency, which could be applicable in the semiconductors industry for using them in electronics or lighting.

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Research predicts how the squirrelpox virus could spread in grey squirrel populations

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

New research involving a Heriot-Watt scientist predicts how the squirrelpox virus could spread in grey squirrel populations in Scotland, and will be useful in planning how best to protect red squirrels.

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New York City Police to Be Equipped With Smartphones and Tablets

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

A program will distribute 41,000 devices across the police department; each of its 35,000 officers will receive a hand-held devices and 6,000 tablets will be installed in police cars.

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Donald A. Pels, Media Executive and Philanthropist, Dies at 86

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Mr. Pels, whose early investment in cellphone networks paid off for his company and for himself, had become a major philanthropist in his later years.

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The Queen sends her first tweet

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

London’s Science Museum is unveiling the Information Age gallery, taking visitors through the history of modern communications.

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Three-dimensional metamaterials with a natural bent

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Metamaterials, a hot area of research today, are artificial materials engineered with resonant elements to display properties that are not found in natural materials. By organizing materials in a specific way, scientists can build materials with a negative refractivity, for example, which refract light at a reverse angle from normal materials. However, metamaterials up to now have harbored a significant downside. Unlike natural materials, they are two-dimensional and inherently anisotropic, meaning that they are designed to act in a certain direction. By contrast, three-dimensional natural materials typically look the same from all directions. For instance, water in a glass acts as an isotropic material for light, even though the water molecule itself has an asymmetric and anisotropic structure.

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Researchers urge early help for kindergarten students with low self-regulation

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Academic success for a first-grader depends in part on both high self-regulation in kindergarten and a low-conflict relationship between student and teacher. Parents can help students improve self-regulation and teachers can learn to provide a better classroom environment for all students.

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Harvard astronomer Loeb caught up in the thrill of the search

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Almost every clear night, Avi Loeb, chairman of Harvard’s Astronomy Department, steps onto his porch and looks up at the Milky Way. The gleaming stars could be the lights of a giant space ship.

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Legal fight begins to save beavers

Written By: admin - Oct• 25•14

Campaigners start legal action to prevent the government from capturing a family of wild beavers.

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