Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Peugeot hybrid compressed-air car set for Paris Motor Show

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

An 860-kilogram concept city car from Peugeot indicates impressive fuel economy. This latest concept "has its sights set on meeting the French government’s goal of putting an affordable 2.0l/100km (141mpg) car into production by 2020," said Jordan Bishop in Auto Express. Peugeot will be showcasing its 208 HYbrid Air 2L at next month’s Paris Motor Show. In announcing the car, Peugeot said it was applying skills across the gamut of automotive applications to continuously lower fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. To lower fuel consumption to 2.0 l/100km, company engineers and project partners used technologies previously reserved for competition and luxury models. Peugeot is showcasing its 208 HYbrid Air 2L technology demonstrator at the Paris Motor Show. The show car is lighter than a standard 208 hatch—the concept is a mix of steel, aluminum and composites, according to HybridCars.com.

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Hit ‘Just Dance’ game goes mobile Sept. 25

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Smartphone lovers will get to show off moves almost anywhere with the Sept. 25 release of a free "Just Dance Now" game tuned for mobile Internet lifestyles.

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Alibaba’s plan: Today, China. Tomorrow, the world.

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Amazon and eBay should watch their backs. As Chinese e-commerce powerhouse Alibaba readies what could be the biggest initial public offering ever on the New York Stock Exchange, it is quietly hinting at plans to expand into the U.S. The company controls nearly 80 percent of all e-commerce in China, and founder and chairman Jack Ma has ambitions that go beyond the country’s borders.

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Stem cells use ‘first aid kits’ to repair damage

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Stem cells hold great promise as a means of repairing cells in conditions such as multiple sclerosis, stroke or injuries of the spinal cord because they have the ability to develop into almost any cell type. Now, new research shows that stem cell therapy can also work through a mechanism other than cell replacement.

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Team reports reliable, highly efficient method for making stem cells

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have found a way to boost dramatically the efficiency of the process for turning adult cells into so-called pluripotent stem cells by combining three well-known compounds, including vitamin C. Using the new technique in mice, the researchers increased the number of stem cells obtained from adult skin cells by more than 20-fold compared with the standard method. They say their technique is efficient and reliable, and thus should generally accelerate research aimed at using stem cells to generate virtually any tissue. Stem cells are immature or uncommitted cells that are theoretically capable of becoming any cell type.

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Well: Artificial Sweeteners May Disrupt Body’s Blood Sugar Controls

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

New research in mice suggests artificial sweeteners may disrupt the ability to regulate blood sugar, causing changes in metabolism that can be a precursor to diabetes.

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DealBook: Zalando I.P.O. Could Value Company at Up to $7.3 Billion

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The German online retailer, one of Europe’s most prominent technology start-ups, expects to price its stock at 18 euros to 22.50 euros a share.

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Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Twinkling stars and swirling gases – winning visions of the night sky

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Last month was hottest August since 1880

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Last month was the hottest August on record for global average temperatures over land and ocean surfaces, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said on Thursday.

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First eyewitness accounts of mystery volcanic eruption

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

New light has been shed on one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in the last 500 years—the so-called ‘Unknown eruption’—thanks to an unusual collaboration between a historian and a team of earth scientists at the University of Bristol, UK.

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New study uncovers factors in students’ reporting of weapons at school

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

As a result of outbreaks of violence in the nation’s schools, concerns have grown about school safety and the overall well-being of students.

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CERN and the American Physical Society announce partnership for open access

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The American Physical Society (APS) and The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) jointly announce a partnership to make all CERN-authored articles published in the APS journal collection to be Open Access. Articles in APS’ Physical Review Letters, Physical Review D, and Physical Review C in 2015 and 2016 will be covered by this agreement. All physics results from CERN will benefit from this partnership, in theoretical physics and experimental physics, at the LHC accelerator as well as other experimental programs.

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Users frustrated by Apple iOS update

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Apple iPhone and iPad users take to social media to express their frustration over installing the company’s latest software update.

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Quantum internet could keep us safe from spying eyes

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Secure networks between cities are just the beginning of an internet where not even the NSA can read your email

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Temperature-driven clock sparks new kind of generator

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Inspired by a 1920s clock that harnessed changes in the volume of a gas as it heats and cools, researchers may be able to power sensors cheaply for decades

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Bits Blog: News Corp. and Google in a War of Words

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The publishing giant accused the search giant of being a “vast, powerful, often unaccountable bureaucracy,” and Google fired back with a tabloid reference to a hamster sandwich.

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Report Cites Forced Labor in Malaysia’s Electronics Industry

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

About a third of the 200,000 migrant workers in Malaysia’s thriving electronics industry are employed in forced labor conditions, according to Verité, a factory monitoring group.

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US military contractors hit by hacks

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

A US Senate report suggests hackers associated with the Chinese government broke into computers of airlines and ships.

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DealBook: Computer Security Firm Raises $35 Million From K.K.R. and Others

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Ping’s business is creating what the company’s founder calls a universal identity for corporations in an age when employees increasingly use different devices and cloud-based applications.

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DealBook: Zalando I.P.O. Could Value Company at Up to $7.3 Billion

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The German online retailer, one of Europe’s most prominent technology start-ups, expects to price its stock at 18 euros to 22.50 euros a share.

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Bits Blog: Apple Says iOS 8 Update Keeps Data Private, Even From the Police

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The company says its new policy makes it technically impossible for it to comply with government warrants asking for customer information.

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Bits Blog: Amazon Refreshes Its Kindle Line

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The updated tablets aim at a variety of audiences: from adults who want to work on their tablets to children.

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Bits Blog: F.T.C. Fines Yelp and TinyCo for Violating Children’s Privacy Rules

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The commission found that the companies violated a privacy act known as Coppa in part because they didn’t obtain parental consent before collecting information from children under 13.

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Bits Blog: IBM Offers Workers Training and Pay Cuts

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

IBM is cutting the pay of some of its services workers by 10 percent while they are being trained in cloud, mobile and big data computing.

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Glacial lake is green with wonder in winning photo

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

An otherworldly photograph of a lagoon reflecting the swirls of the aurora has taken the top prize in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition

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VIDEO: Tech for night-time photography

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

A look at the latest gadgets which could make it easier to take the perfect night-time picture.

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Murder ‘comes naturally’ to chimps

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

A major international study finds that killings among chimpanzees result from normal competition, not human interference.

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VIDEO: Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Twinkling stars and swirling gases – winning visions of the night sky

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Glimpse at the High Street 2020

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

What is the future of shopping and how different will the High Street look in 2020?

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Bits Blog: News Corp. and Google in a War of Words

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The publishing giant accused the search giant of being a “vast, powerful, often unaccountable bureaucracy,” and Google fired back with a tabloid reference to a hamster sandwich.

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A step into the unmown creates a ‘win-win’ for wildlife and humans

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Creating unmown areas in an urban park can significantly increase flowers and pollinating insects while also leading to a greater enjoyment of the space by people, according to a University of Sussex study.

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Bits Blog: Apple Says iOS 8 Update Keeps Data Private, Even From the Police

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The company says its new policy makes it technically impossible for it to comply with government warrants asking for customer information.

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New research provides understanding that helps control legume viruses

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Farmers in south-west WA will be pleased to find out that a PhD candidate from The University of Western Australia has made significant advances in our understanding of major plant pathogen Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV).

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Unforeseen dioxin formation in waste incineration

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Dioxins forms faster, at lower temperatures and under other conditions than previously thought. This may affect how we in the future construct sampling equipment, flue gas filtering systems for waste incineration and how to treat waste incineration fly ash. These are some of the conclusions Eva Weidemann draws in her doctoral thesis, which she defends at Umeå University on Friday the 26 of September.

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Mice nest together to confuse paternity and reduce infanticide

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

It is a cruel world out there, particularly for young animals born into social groups where infanticide occurs. This dark side of evolution is revealed when adults – often males – kill offspring to promote their own genes being passed on, by reducing competition for resources or making females become sexually receptive more quickly.

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Power struggles, doubt all found in the Facebook of Egypt’s revolution

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Egypt’s 2011 revolution, described at the time as a "Facebook revolution," made Linda Herrera a big believer in the power of social media. A past resident of Cairo who had studied the online culture of Egyptian youth and followed events through their Facebook pages, the University of Illinois education professor became, for a moment in time, a "complete cyber-optimist."

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Evolutionary study aids battle against parasitic diseases

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

A University of Stirling study has shed new light on the way parasite lifecycles have evolved and may help scientists develop more effective plans for managing the many diseases they cause.

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Apps for electric cars

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Siemens is equipping electric cars with completely redesigned information and communications technology (ICT). Basically, the idea is to control a variety of vehicle functions on a uniform, centralized computer platform instead of providing every system with its own hardware and software as today. The aim is to simplify the complicated interplay of the many assistance, safety, and infotainment systems. In addition, separating the software from the technology on which it runs facilitates retrofitting new features. In the same way that apps use smartphones’ existing technology, such as GPS or cameras for their own purposes, integrated standard components such as proximity sensors, control units, and display elements could be used for new functions in automobiles. The all-new ICT concept was developed by Siemens’ global Corporate Technology (CT) department and its partners in the government-funded RACE project.

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Alibaba symbol of China’s new tech giants

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Alibaba Group’s U.S. stock offering is a wakeup call about an emerging wave of technology giants in China’s state-dominated economy.

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Magnetic neural control with nanoparticles

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Magnetic nanoparticles don’t have to be "one size fits all." Instead, individual magnetic nanoparticles can be tailored in an array of differing sizes and compositions to allow for heating them separately by varying the frequency and amplitude of an external alternating magnetic field, MIT graduate student Michael G. Christiansen and colleagues show in a recent Applied Physics Letters paper.

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Physicists heat freestanding graphene to control curvature of ripples

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

(Phys.org) —An international team of physicists, led by a research group at the University of Arkansas, has discovered that heating can be used to control the curvature of ripples in freestanding graphene.

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Very Long Baseline Array takes radio image of Voyager 1

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The image above is a radio image of Voyager 1. It was taken from the Very Long Baseline Array, which is a collection of 10 radio telescopes scattered from Hawaii to the Virgin Islands. It captures the faint radio signal of the distant probe. That pale blue dot is the most distant object made by humans.

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The oscillator that could makeover the mechanical watch

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

For the first time in 200 years the heart of the mechanical watch has been reinvented, thereby improving precision and autonomy while making the watch completely silent. EPFL researchers have developed an oscillator that turns continuously in one direction, eliminating one of the crucial mechanisms of traditional watches.

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Transmedia storytelling with apps could expand but also exploit children’s stories

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The app market is estimated to generate US$77 billion (£47.2 billion) in revenue each year – and the segment of children’s apps has grown particularly strongly. However, given that developing an app costs between $10,000-70,000 and each only sells for usually around a dollar, an app needs thousands of downloads to ensure a return on investment. Children’s app producers find it hard to survive and are desperately searching for a sound business model.

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The curious case of the fluctuating speed of light

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Suppose you were an electrician. You’ve trained, apprenticed, passed all your certifications, and you’ve worked with electric wiring for years. You’ve wired houses and commercial buildings for years, and you feel pretty confident in your trade. One day you finish wiring a light switch, dust off your hands, and flip the switch to test it. But instead of seeing the light turn right on, you find that it flickers dimly. You’re pretty sure you wired things correctly, so what do you do?

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Concern grows over pet pills and products, as well as those of owners

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

(Phys.org) —Scientists have long been aware of the potential environment impacts that stem from the use and disposal of the array of products people use to keep themselves healthy, clean and smelling nice. Now a new concern is emerging – improper disposal of pet care products and pills.

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Students trust technology, but have concerns about privacy and robotics, poll shows

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Purdue University students are optimistic about how technology will improve their lives but have concerns about privacy and the role of specific technologies, according to a poll.

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Dot Earth Blog: Looking Back to 1821, Insurers Foresee a $100-Billion Hurricane

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

If the great 1821 hurricane struck the East Coast today, it would leave a $100-billion trail of losses.

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Separation of para and ortho water

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

(Phys.org) —Not all water is equal—at least not at the molecular level. There are two versions of the water molecule, para and ortho water, in which the spin states of the hydrogen nuclei are different. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German researchers have now reported the successful separation of the two forms.

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Bits Blog: Amazon Refreshes Its Kindle Line

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The updated tablets aim at a variety of audiences: from adults who want to work on their tablets to children.

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Bits Blog: News Corp. and Google in a War of Words

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The publishing giant accused the search giant of being a “vast, powerful, often unaccountable bureaucracy,” and Google fired back with a tabloid reference to a hamster sandwich.

Read more here

Bits Blog: F.T.C. Fines Yelp and TinyCo for Violating Children’s Privacy Rules

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The commission found that the companies violated a privacy act known as Coppa in part because they didn’t obtain parental consent before collecting information from children under 13.

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Species going extinct 1,000 times faster than in pre-human times, study finds

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

(Phys.org) —University of Georgia ecologists John Gittleman and Patrick Stephens are contributors to a major new study that finds that species are going extinct today 1,000 times faster than during pre-human times—a rate an order of magnitude higher than the previous estimate.

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Connected computing offers a new life for blind people, and job opportunities too

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

There are many examples of individuals with different disabilities who excel and accomplish much in their lifetime, rendering physical or mental attributes meaningless – consider Stephen Hawking, Stevie Wonder and Helen Keller, among many others.

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New studies find significant declines in price of rooftop and utility-scale solar

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The price of solar energy in the United States continues to fall substantially, according to the latest editions of two annual reports produced by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

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Seeding plant diversity for future generations

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

(Phys.org) —The Millennium Seed Bank dries, freezes, stores and maintains seeds for future generations to enjoy and use. It aims to save seeds from all the wild plant species of the world and so far, since its founding in 2000, it has banked 14% of them. Scientists from the University of Oxford and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, which manages the Millennium Seed Bank, have shown how by using advanced mathematics they can boost the overall diversity of the seed bank by targeting a ‘hit list’ of particular species. Their paper also includes maps showing where the species are located so they can be efficiently gathered. The findings are published in the journal Conservation Biology.

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Finding supports model on cause of DNA’s right-handed double helix

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

The DNA of every organism on Earth is a right-handed double helix, but why that would be has puzzled scientists since not long after Francis Crick and James Watson announced the discovery of DNA’s double-helical structure in 1953.

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Apple iPhone lacks ‘key’ licence in China

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Apple’s iPhone 6 still lacks a key network access licence in China, state media confirmed Thursday on the eve of its global launch, breaking official silence on why sales of the smartphone will be delayed.

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Sweeping security law would have computer users surrender privacy

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Parliament is about to consider a range of changes to Australia’s security laws introduced by the Abbott government during its last sitting. The most controversial measures in the National Security Legislation Amendment Bill 2014 (Cth) include stronger anti-whistleblower provisions and a "special intelligence operations" regime that would grant ASIO officers immunity from civil and criminal liability.

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Research team aims to improve plant-based battery with neutrons, simulation

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

(Phys.org) —When Orlando Rios first started analyzing samples of carbon fibers made from a woody plant polymer known as lignin, he noticed something unusual. The material’s microstructure—a mixture of perfectly spherical nanoscale crystallites distributed within a fibrous matrix—looked almost too good to be true.

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Users frustrated by Apple iOS update

Written By: admin - Sep• 19•14

Apple iPhone and iPad users take to social media to express their frustration over installing the company’s latest software update.

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Yes, physically disciplining kids is an act of violence

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Children endure many forms of violence, from slapping and pushing, to fatal assaults; almost one in five of the world’s homicide victims in 2012 were under 20.

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Spacesuits of the future may resemble a streamlined second skin

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

For future astronauts, the process of suiting up may go something like this: Instead of climbing into a conventional, bulky, gas-pressurized suit, an astronaut may don a lightweight, stretchy garment, lined with tiny, musclelike coils. She would then plug in to a spacecraft’s power supply, triggering the coils to contract and essentially shrink-wrap the garment around her body.

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Japan, neighbors agree to moves to protect eels

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

(Japan has agreed to cut purchases of eel fry from neighboring East Asian countries by 20 percent as part of moves to protect the endangered species.

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Glacial lake is green with wonder in winning photo

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

An otherworldly photograph of a lagoon reflecting the swirls of the aurora has taken the top prize in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition

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Ericsson to stop making modems, shed hundreds of jobs

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Swedish telecom equipment company Ericsson said on Thursday that it would stop developing modems, a decision affecting almost 1,600 employees worldwide which is expected to lead to hundreds of job cuts.

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The causes of China’s record level fine particulate pollution in winter 2013

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

At the beginning of 2013 a greyish-brown blanket of smog lay over large areas of China for several months. The fine particle pollution was higher by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude than the levels normally measured in Western Europe and the United States. An international team of researchers under the lead of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and the Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of the Sciences revealed the causes of the "airpocalypse". The study published in the journal Nature also describes what steps are to be taken to prevent an environmental crisis of this kind in the future.

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Plant engineered for more efficient photosynthesis

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

(Phys.org) —A genetically engineered tobacco plant, developed with two genes from blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), holds promise for improving the yields of many food crops.

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Russia’s biggest social network VKontakte gets new CEO

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Russia’s biggest social network VKontakte appointed a new chief executive on Thursday after the removal of its maverick founder Pavel Durov earlier this year.

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How stress tears us apart

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Chronic stress can lead to behavioral problems. A team from the Brain Mind Institute has discovered an important synaptic mechanism: the activation of a cleaving enzyme, leading to these problems.

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Scientists pioneer microscopy technique that yields fresh data on muscular dystrophy

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

New microscopy technique yields resolution an order of magnitude better than previously possible.

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Amazon unveils new Fire tablets and Kindle e-readers

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Amazon.com on Wednesday expanded its array of tablets and Kindle e-readers, capping its line-up with a new flagship Fire HDX model boasting ‘stunning’ display and Dolby Atmos sound.

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With IPO, Alibaba looks to unlock new markets

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Alibaba’s record-setting stock offering due this week gives the Chinese online group a huge war chest that can help its global expansion.

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Germany’s Bayer says will float chemicals division

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer, maker of Aspirin painkiller, said on Thursday it intends to float its chemicals Material Science division to focus on its life sciences activities in human and animal health.

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Scientists monitoring Hawaii lava undertake risks

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

New photos from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory give a glimpse into the hazardous work scientists undertake to monitor lava that’s threatening to cross a major highway.

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Upgrade to iOS 8 now or wait?

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Apple’s iOS 8 software update for iPhones and iPads is worth getting—but not necessarily right away.

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Review: Devices, apps act like one under iOS 8

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

The scores of new features in Apple’s software update for mobile devices can be boiled down to one word: unity.

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Murder ‘comes naturally’ to chimps

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

A major international study finds that killings among chimpanzees result from normal competition, not human interference.

Read more here

VIDEO: Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Twinkling stars and swirling gases – winning visions of the night sky

Read more here

Bits Blog: Apple Says iOS 8 Update Keeps Data Private, Even From the Police

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

The company says its new policy makes it technically impossible for it to comply with government warrants asking for customer information.

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Bits Blog: Apple Says iOS 8 Update Keeps Data Private, Even From the Police

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

The company says its new policy makes it technically impossible for it to comply with government warrants asking for customer information.

Read more here

Busy Days Precede a March Focusing on Climate Change

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

The People’s Climate March will run through Midtown Manhattan on Sunday, and organizers hope to attract thousands of participants from across the world to New York City for the event.

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World Briefing: Slovenia: Japan Seeks to Resume Whale Hunting

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Japan sought international backing on Wednesday for its plan to resume whale hunting in the Antarctic next year, despite a ruling against it by the top United Nations court.

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Well: Artificial Sweeteners May Disrupt Body’s Blood Sugar Controls

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

New research in mice suggests artificial sweeteners may disrupt the ability to regulate blood sugar, causing changes in metabolism that can be a precursor to diabetes.

Read more here

U.N. Leader Plans Stronger Presence in Ebola Zone

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

The move by the secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon, signaled his concern with the response so far and the limitations of the World Health Organization’s ability to handle it alone.

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Elizabeth Whelan, Who Challenged Food Laws, Dies at 70

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Ms. Whelan was an epidemiologist who started a national organization to question conventional wisdom on food, chemicals and the environment.

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Bits Blog: Amazon Refreshes Its Kindle Line

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

The updated tablets aim at a variety of audiences: from adults who want to work on their tablets to children.

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What will Alibaba do with $25bn?

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

What will Alibaba do with $25bn?

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Bits Blog: F.T.C. Fines Yelp and TinyCo for Violating Children’s Privacy Rules

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

The commission found that the companies violated a privacy act known as Coppa in part because they didn’t obtain parental consent before collecting information from children under 13.

Read more here

Report Cites Forced Labor in Malaysia’s Electronics Industry

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

About a third of the 200,000 migrant workers in Malaysia’s thriving electronics industry are employed in forced labor conditions, according to Verité, a factory monitoring group.

Read more here

Bits Blog: IBM Offers Workers Training and Pay Cuts

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

IBM is cutting the pay of some of its services workers by 10 percent while they are being trained in cloud, mobile and big data computing.

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Rainbow galaxies reveal why cosmos is full of spirals

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Psychedelic pictures of 30 galactic collisions show for the first time that merging galaxies often spawn disc-shaped offspring like our Milky Way

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App Smart: Let the Phone Be Your Political Adviser

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Mobile apps offer news and opinion on politicians and issues, and even information straight from Congress and the White House.

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State of the Art: Finding Virtue in a Phablet

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Clunky though the term may be, a phablet — part phone, part tablet — is a device that offers welcome versatility.

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Lasers slim down on stopped-light diet

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

A new kind of laser that powers up by freezing light in its tracks could lead to computers that run on photons instead of electrons

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Bits Blog: Y Combinator, a Start-Up Incubator, Goes to College

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

The popular early stage venture funding outfit plans to teach its own college-level class at Stanford University on becoming a successful start-up.

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IBM’s Watson rolled out to business

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

IBM’s supercomputer Watson is being made available to businesses to answer tricky questions.

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eBay attack puts its buyers at risk

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

A sophisticated attack on eBay compromises at least two listings so that users who click on them are redirected to a fake page that attempts to steal their credentials.

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Sony predicts increased losses

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

Japanese consumer electronics giant Sony says its annual loss may be more than four times bigger than initially forecast, due to its struggling mobile business.

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Boeing and SpaceX bag NASA’s $6.8bn space taxi prize

Written By: admin - Sep• 18•14

NASA has announced that two private companies, Boeing and SpaceX, will start launching astronauts to the International Space Station in 2017

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