Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Websites creak on record Black Friday

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Retailers including John Lewis and Currys head for record online sales as frenzied shopping swamps websites.

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Syrian hack attack forces pop-ups

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

A number of websites have been compromised to display a message from a group identifying itself as the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA).

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Medical-isotope breakthrough made at Canadian lab

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Photo-neutron production of commercial molybdenum-99 is a first

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Is Jupiter’s Great Red Spot a Sunburn?

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The ruddy color of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is likely a product of simple chemicals being broken apart by sunlight in the planet’s upper atmosphere, according to a new analysis of data from NASA’s Cassini mission. The results contradict the other leading theory for the origin of the spot’s striking color — that the reddish chemicals come from beneath Jupiter’s clouds.

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Audi to develop Tesla Model S all-electric rival

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The Tesla Model S has a rival. Audi is to develop all-electric family car. This is to be a family car that will offer an all-electric range of 280 miles (450 kilometers), according to Auto Express, which reported that the vehicle is under development and is to arrive in 2017. Audi’s technical development chief Ulrich Hackenberg told Auto Express, "I was able to reengineer the R8 e-tron project and technology with the team and we are on the way to a range of 450km (280 miles)." Auto Express reporter Jonathan Burn said the all-electric family car is expected to adopt a saloon style body to allow for better packaging. "The larger surface area of a saloon would allow for the bigger and more powerful batteries to be stowed beneath the floor of the car so to not encroach on boot or passenger space."

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Dot Earth Blog: Gratitude, Woodworking and Music on the Home Front on Thanksgiving

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Fitting in some analog home time, and music, amid the digital flow of work seeking a better planet.

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New largest number factored on a quantum device is 56,153

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

(Phys.org)—Researchers have set a new record for the quantum factorization of the largest number to date, 56,153, smashing the previous record of 143 that was set in 2012. They have shown that the exact same room-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment used to factor 143 can actually factor an entire class of numbers, although this was not known until now. Because this computation, which is based on a minimization algorithm involving 4 qubits, does not require prior knowledge of the answer, it outperforms all implementations of Shor’s algorithm to date, which do require prior knowledge of the answer. Expanding on this method, the researchers also theoretically show how the same minimization algorithm can be used to factor even larger numbers, such as 291,311, with only 6 qubits.

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Climate rhetoric faces devil in the detail at Lima talks

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Politically sidelined since a 2009 UN summit almost ended in a bust-up, climate change has resurfaced as a priority but faces a brutal test at talks opening in Lima on Monday.

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Van Allen Probes Spot an Impenetrable … rier in Space

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Two donuts of seething radiation that surround Earth, called the Van Allen radiation belts, have been found to contain a nearly impenetrable barrier that prevents the fastest, most energetic electrons from reaching Earth.

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Naked nebula reveals astronomy’s colour tricks

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

A raw picture of the Helix nebula reveals the processing involved in creating stunning astronomical images

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Bits Blog: New F.A.A. Report Tallies Drone Sightings, Highlighting Safety Issues

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The list is not comprehensive, but it still provides a good idea of why the F.A.A. and others are increasingly concerned about the safe operation of drones.

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Sony makes experimental paper watch

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Sony has developed a watch made from e-paper as part of an initiative to experiment with the use of the material for fashion products.

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Websites creak on record Black Friday

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Retailers including John Lewis and Currys head for record online sales as frenzied shopping swamps websites.

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Researchers collect soil samples from around the globe in effort to conduct fungi survey

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

(Phys.org)—A large team of researchers with members from around the world has conducted a global survey of soil fungi by collecting thousands of soil samples from sites all around the world. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their survey, how they performed DNA analysis on the specimens they found, and what they learned in doing so. David Wardle and Bjorn Lindahl of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences offer a Perspectives piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue.

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Venus Express spacecraft, low on fuel, does delicate dance above doom below

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

It’s been an interesting year for Venus Express. A few months ago, controllers deliberately dipped the spacecraft into the atmosphere of the planet—for science purposes, of course. The daring maneuver was approved because the spacecraft is near the end of its mission. It’s nearly out of fuel and will fall into Venus—sometime. Likely in 2015. No one knows exactly when, however.

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‘Meteoric smoke’: Comet siding spring could alter Mars chemistry permanently

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Feeling lucky? Events such as the Comet Siding Spring approach by Mars in October only happen about once every eight million years, according to NASA.

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High-fidelity photon-to-atom quantum state transfer could form backbone of quantum networks

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

(Phys.org) —In a quantum network, information is stored, processed, and transmitted from one device to another in the form of quantum states. The quantum nature of the network gives it certain advantages over classical networks, such as greater security.

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Retail Strategy: Shopping on a Phone Is Still Uncommon but Growing Fast

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Sales on computers are growing much faster than sales in offline stores, and sales on mobile phones are growing faster still.

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Syrian Hackers Infiltrate Business Site, Affecting Other Websites

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Gigya, an American company that helps connect more than 700 businesses with customers through social media, says a Syrian group hacked its web address.

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Websites creak on record Black Friday

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Retailers including John Lewis and Currys head for record online sales as frenzied shopping swamps websites.

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Bridgmanite: World’s most abundant mineral finally named

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

A team of geologists in the U.S. has finally found an analyzable sample of the most abundant mineral in the world allowing them to give it a name: bridgmanite. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they were able to analyze a sample of the mineral in a meteorite. Thomas Sharp of Arizona State University offers an analysis of the research in the same journal issue.

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Parasitic worm genomes: largest-ever dataset released

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The largest collection of helminth genomic data ever assembled has been published in the new, open-access WormBase-ParaSite. Developed jointly by EMBL-EBI and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, this new resource will be a major asset in the fight against parasitic worms, which infect more than one billion people worldwide.

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Study shows graphene able to withstand a speeding bullet

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers working at Rice University in the U.S. has demonstrated that graphene is better able to withstand the impact of a bullet than either steel or Kevlar. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they set up a miniature firing range in their laboratory and used it to test the strength of graphene sheets.

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New report highlights ‘significant and increasing’ risks from extreme weather

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

University of Exeter researchers have played a crucial role in creating a comprehensive new report indicating that the global risk from extreme weather is set to intensify.

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Pop music heritage contributes to the formation of identity

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The musical rebels of the past are today’s museum pieces. Pop music is increasingly penetrating heritage institutions such as museums and archives. That is apparent from the PhD research of Arno van der Hoeven. On Thursday 27 November 2014 he defended his thesis entitled ‘Popular Music Memories. Places and practices of popular music heritage, memory and cultural identity’ at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. In his research, Van der Hoeven also shows that pop music heritage contributes to the formation of people’s identity.

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Male sex organ distinguishes 30 millipede species

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The unique shapes of male sex organs have helped describe thirty new millipede species from the Great Western Woodlands in the Goldfields, the largest area of relatively undisturbed Mediterranean climate woodlands in the world.

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Germany signs no-spy deal with BlackBerry

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Germany has approved BlackBerry’s purchase of encryption firm Secusmart after signing a "no-spy" agreement with the Canadian smartphone maker.

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Orion on track at T MINUS 1 Week to first blastoff

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

At T MINUS 1 Week on this Thanksgiving Holiday, all launch processing events remain on track for the first blast off of NASA’s new Orion crew vehicle on Dec. 4, 2014 which marks the first step on the long road towards sending Humans to Mars in the 2030s.

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Helping older employees stay in their jobs

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Factors that can hinder older employees from continuing to work include workload, a poor memory and the pensionable age-effect. The Job-Exposure Matrix is a newly developed instrument that provides an easy way to chart the workload of older employees. Kelly Rijs investigated how people experience their own health at the end of their career and the influence of the pensionable age on this. Rijs defended her doctoral thesis on 20 November 2014 at the VU Medical Center.

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Vortex of electrons provides unprecedented information on magnetic quantum states in solids

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Electron states in solids are responsible for many material properties, such as color and electrical conductivity. However, because of their confinement within the crystal, it is very difficult to study the quantum physical properties of the electrons in detail. Konstantin Bliokh and Franco Nori from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, in collaboration with researchers in Austria, have now successfully measured free electron properties equivalent to those in solids for the first time using vortex electron beams formed by a transmission electron microscope.

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Earliest stages of ear development involve a localized signaling cascade

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The proteins associated with driving the cell shape changes that internalize the embryonic inner ear have been identified by Raj Ladher and colleagues from the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology. "Our hope," says Ladher, "is that by understanding the morphogenesis of the inner ear, clinicians will become more aware of what to look for in their diagnosis of otic developmental defects."

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Gun sensors could hold US cops to account

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

In the wake of the Ferguson shooting, devices that record how and when a gun is fired could aid inquiries into police actions

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New age of the Lantian Homo erectus cranium extending to about 1.63 million years ago

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

According to paper published online November 20 in the Journal of Human Evolution, the age of the Lantian Homo erectus cranium from Gongwangling, Lantian County, Shaanxi Province, China, is likely half a million years older than previously thought. Earlier estimates dated this important fossil, which was found in 1964, to 1.15 million years ago. A research team of Chinese and British scientists, have provided compelling evidence that the fossil should be dated to 1.63 million years ago, making it the oldest fossil hominin cranium known in northeast Asia, and the second oldest site with cranial remains outside Africa. Only the Dmanisi crania from Georgia that, like Lantian, are relatively small-brained, are older, at around 1.75 million years old.

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Scientists film magnetic memory in super slow-motion

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Researchers at DESY have used high-speed photography to film one of the candidates for the magnetic data storage devices of the future in action. The film was taken using an X-ray microscope and shows magnetic vortices being formed in ultrafast memory cells. Their work, which has been reported by the scientists surrounding Dr. Philipp Wessels of the University of Hamburg in the journal Physical Review B, provides a better understanding of the dynamics of magnetic storage materials. Magnetic memory cells are found in every computer hard drive.

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Greener cities are cooler cities in summer: new guide reveals how

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Australian councils are being urged to take up new guidelines in green urban planning to create cooler cites with greener landscapes to reduce the risk of heat stress.

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Luxembourg: a tax haven by any other name? Professor on ‘secret’ tax deals

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The revelations that global and multinational businesses have been brokering "secret" tax deals with Luxembourg to avoid paying taxes in their home countries, may be the first time an entire country has been implicated in tax avoidance collusion.

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A green data center with an autonomous power supply

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

A new data center in the United States is generating electricity for its servers entirely from renewable sources, converting biogas from a sewage treatment plant into electricity and water. Siemens implemented the pilot project, which recently went into operation, together with Microsoft and FuelCell Energy. The data center is not connected to the public power grid. Siemens developed and installed intelligent control and monitoring technology for the plant as well as energy management software so that the servers can be reliably supplied with electricity at all times. The partners intend to demonstrate that using intelligent hardware and software, even critical installations such as data centers can be reliably operated with alternative energy sources.

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Emergency repairs for cracked phones

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

A broken screen on a smartphone might not seem like one of the most pressing problems – but firms are now offering a very quick fix.

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Websites creak on record Black Friday

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Retailers including John Lewis and Currys head for record online sales as frenzied shopping swamps websites.

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Explainer: What is a small private online course?

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

If you have studied an online course at a university over the past couple of decades, you’ve probably already experienced a SPOC, or Small Private Online Course. SPOC is a new term for an old concept, which appears to be frustrating members of the distance education community:

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Domino’s square pizza is value for money – with the right toppings

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Consider a standard pizza box containing a standard circular pizza. How much more would you be willing to pay for a square pizza that filled the box?

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Girls better than boys at making story-based computer games, study finds

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

(Phys.org)—Teenage boys are perhaps more known for playing computer games but girls are better at making them, a University of Sussex study has found.

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After a data breach, it’s consumers left holding the bag

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Shoppers have launched into the holiday buying season and retailers are looking forward to year-end sales that make up almost 20% of their annual receipts. But as you check out at a store or click "purchase" on your online shopping cart, you might be setting yourself up as the victim of a crime.

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Can we create an energy efficient Internet?

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

With the number of Internet connected devices rapidly increasing, researchers from Melbourne are starting a new research program to reduce energy consumption of such devices.

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The emergence of modern sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, 2.6 million years ago

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

"We have not seen an ice free period in the Arctic Ocean for 2,6 million years. However, we may see it in our lifetime," says marine geologist Jochen Knies. In an international collaborative project, Knies has studied the historic emergence of the ice in the Arctic Ocean. The results are published in Nature Communications.

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ESA image: Tropical thaw: Quelccaya ice cap, Peru

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

This image features Peru’s Quelccaya ice cap, the largest in the Tropics.

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Tabletop experiment could detect gravitational waves

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

(Phys.org)—A coin-sized detector might observe gravitational waves before the giant Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), according to two Australian physicists.

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Staying warm: The hot gas in clusters of galaxies

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Most galaxies lie in clusters, groupings of a few to many thousands of galaxies. Our Milky Way galaxy itself is a member of the "Local Group," a band of about fifty galaxies whose other large member is the Andromeda Galaxy about 2.3 million light-years away. The closest large cluster of galaxies to us is the Virgo Cluster, about 50 million light-years away, with about 2000 members.

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Gold rush an ecological disaster for Peruvian Amazon

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

A lush expanse of Amazon rainforest known as the "Mother of God" is steadily being destroyed in Peru, with the jungle giving way to mercury-filled tailing ponds used to extract the gold hidden underground.

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Love at first smell: Can birds choose mates by their odors?

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Mate choice is often the most important decision in the lives of humans and animals. Scientists at the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology at the Vetmeduni Vienna have found the first evidence that birds may choose their mate through odor. The researchers compared the preen gland chemicals of black-legged kittiwakes with genes that play a role in immunity. Kittiwakes that smell similarly to each other also have similar genes for immunity. Since the birds prefer to mate with unrelated mates, the scientists have now found the likely mechanism by which they recognize relatedness. The scientists published their findings in Nature’s Scientific Reports.

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New material makes water and oil roll off

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Car finish, to which no dirt particles adhere, house fronts, from which graffiti paints roll off, and shoes that remain clean on muddy paths – the material "fluoropore" might make all this possible. Both water and oil droplets roll off this new class of highly fluorinated super-repellent polymers. The Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) has now decided to fund its further development at the KIT with EUR 2.85 million. Fundamental research in this area is aimed among others at making use of this new type of material for universal protective coatings.

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Airport raids tackle cyberthieves

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Cyberthieves who used stolen credit cards to buy airline tickets are targeted in raids at 80 airports.

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The noodle-bowl effect: Australian trade is increasingly complex

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Fact: over 585 regional trade agreements have been signed. Almost 400 are already operating. Australia is a signatory to at least 12 of them.

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JUICE mission gets green light for next stage of development

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The European Space Agency’s JUICE (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer) mission has been given the green light to proceed to the next stage of development. This approval is a milestone for the mission, which aims to launch in 2022 to explore Jupiter and its potentially habitable icy moons.

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It’s hard for voters to trust leaders who won’t promise true integrity

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The Accountability Round Table (ART), a non-partisan organisation, wrote to the three major political parties two months ago seeking their position on three important arms of Victoria’s integrity system: Freedom of Information, the Independent Broad-Based Anti-Corruption Commission, and political donations.

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Brain inspired data engineering

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

What if next-generation ICT systems could be based on the brain’s structure and its cognitive and adaptive processes? A groundbreaking paradigm of brain-inspired intelligent ICT architectures is being born.

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Brown versus white bread: the battle for a fibre-rich diet

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Choosing novel bread for its nutritious value without losing the attractiveness of white bread, is now possible thanks to European research

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Time cloak used to hide messages in laser light

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

A time cloak conceals events rather than objects. Cloaked messages were so secret no one could read them – now they can sneak along optical fibres before being revealed

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Solar tech could enable world’s first underground park

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Visitors from around the world are drawn to New York City’s High Line, an elevated park built on defunct railroad tracks transformed into an urban sanctuary of flowers, grasses and trees.

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E-Voting: Risky technology or great improvement?

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

On this forthcoming weekend the Australian state election takes place, and in Victoria State they will be using a new e-voting system to improve secrecy, reliability and user-friendliness. But how secure are such systems? And do people trust such systems? These are key questions for Prof. Peter Y A Ryan, e-voting expert at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) from the University of Luxembourg. The technology that will be applied at this weekends state election is based on Ryan’s original voting concept called "Pret-a-Voter" that he developed in 2004.

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Graphene promise for body armour

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

The "wonder material" graphene could be used to make bulletproof armour, new research suggests.

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How can we avoid kelp beds turning into barren grounds?

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Urchins are marine invertebrates that mould the biological richness of marine grounds. However, an excessive proliferation of urchins may also have severe ecological consequences on marine grounds as they reduce algal cover and affect the survival of other marine species. To explore global dynamics and the factors that turn kelp beds into barren grounds is the main objective of a new study published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

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Ancient marine algae provides clues of climate change impact on today’s microscopic ocean organisms

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

A study of ancient marine algae, led by the University of Southampton, has found that climate change affected their growth and skeleton structure, which has potential significance for today’s equivalent microscopic organisms that play an important role in the world’s oceans.

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Faradair team determined to make hybrid BEHA fly

Written By: admin - Nov• 29•14

Aiming to transform their concept into a real success, the Faradair team behind a six-seat Bio-Electric-Hybrid-Aircraft (BEHA) have taken this hybrid aircraft project into a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter. They want to make a BEHA prototype.The aircraft will take off and land under electric power. The ability to take off and land on purely electric power gives BEHA the potential for near-silent flight operation and the possibility for night flight capability into and around urban environments. The bio-diesel motor will be used as on-board generator for the electric motors and additional cruise power.

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Australia out of step with new climate momentum

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, who rose to power in large part by opposing a tax on greenhouse gas emissions, is finding his country isolated like never before on climate change as the U.S., China and other nations signal new momentum for action.

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Climate deal: What the scientists say

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

A snapshot of what scientists are saying about climate change ahead of the next round of UN talks opening in Lima on Monday.

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VIDEO: Grey squirrels ‘should be culled’

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

The government is reviewing the way grey squirrels numbers are managed in England, and is assessing whether more needs to be done to control numbers.

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Volcano in south Japan erupts, disrupting flights

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

A volcano in southern Japan is blasting out chunks of magma in the first such eruption in 22 years, causing flight cancellations and prompting warnings to stay away from its crater.

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Bad weather delays Japan asteroid probe lift off

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Bad weather will delay the launch of a Japanese space probe on a six-year mission to mine a distant asteroid, just weeks after a European spacecraft’s historic landing on a comet captivated the world.

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Despite Aid Push, Ebola Is Raging in Sierra Leone

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

After calling for an ambulance more than 35 times a family in Sierra Leone, where Ebola has hit harder than in neighboring countries, waited for three days for help to arrive.

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VIDEO: The watch that fires lasers

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

BBC Click looks at some of the week’s technology highlights.

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How could man intervene to change the climate?

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

The possibilities of geo-engineering

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Bear back in Chernobyl after century

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Camera traps, used by a project assessing radioactive exposure impacts on wildlife, record the first photos of a brown bear in Chernobyl’s exclusion zone.

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Dot Earth Blog: Gratitude, Woodworking and Music on the Home Front on Thanksgiving

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Fitting in some analog home time, and music, amid the digital flow of work seeking a better planet.

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Finding long lost treasures of the deep

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Finding bounty in the depths of Davy Jones’s locker

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VIDEO: How to avoid out-of-battery rage

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

New ways to stop your smartphone running out of battery

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Social media told to simplify terms

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

A report from the UK parliament says Facebook, Twitter and other social networking firms need to make their terms and conditions clearer.

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Social media T&Cs are ‘meaningless drivel’, say politicians

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

A damning report published today by a UK parliamentary committee calls for sites like Facebook and LinkedIn to make their terms and conditions clearer

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New antimicrobial edible films that increase the lifespan of cheese

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) have developed new coatings to apply to soft cheese. These coatings are totally edible and have an antimicrobial capacity, which increases the lifespan of the cheese. These films incorporate oregano and rosemary essential oils as antimicrobial agents, and chitosan, a by-product that comes from crustacean shells.

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LEGO bricks build better mathematicians

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

A study carried out by the University of Derby has found that LEGO plays a vital role in the development of maths skills in children.

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Risks from extreme weather are ‘significant and increasing’

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Human societies are not resilient to extreme weather, according to a new report released by the Royal Society today.

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Scanning tunnelling microscopy: Computer simulations sharpen insights into molecules

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

The resolution of scanning tunnelling microscopes can be improved dramatically by attaching small molecules or atoms to their tip. The resulting images were the first to show the geometric structure of molecules and have generated a lot of interest among scientists over the last few years. Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich and the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Prague have now used computer simulations to gain deeper insights into the physics of these new imaging techniques. One of these techniques was presented in the journal Science by American scientists this spring. The results have now been published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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Manchester scientists boost NASA’s missions to Mars

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Computer Scientists from The University of Manchester have boosted NASA space missions by pioneering a global project to develop programs that efficiently test and control NASA spacecraft.

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Engineers create ‘superomniphobic’ texture capable of repelling all liquids

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

(Phys.org) —A pair of researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has created the first surface texture that can repel all liquids, no matter what material the surface is made of.

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ESA image: The gold standard

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

The Eutelsat-9B satellite with its EDRS-A payload is shown in the anechoic test chamber of Airbus Defence and Space in Toulouse, France, having completed its final antenna pattern tests today.

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Frost-covered chaos on Mars

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Thanks to a break in the dusty ‘weather’ over the giant Hellas Basin at the beginning of this year, ESA’s Mars Express was able to look down into the seven kilometre-deep basin and onto the frosty surface of Hellas Chaos.

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Limestone ‘Venus’ 23,000 years old dug up in France

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

A limestone statuette of a shapely woman some 23,000 years old has been discovered in northern France in what archaeologists Thursday described as an "exceptional" find.

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E.U. Parliament, in Nonbinding Measure, Calls for Breaking Up Google

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

While the vote poses no immediate threat to the company, it symbolizes the growing resentment in Europe toward the American technology titan.

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Scientists may be cracking mystery of big 1872 earthquake

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Geologists may be close to cracking one of the biggest seismological mysteries in the Pacific Northwest: the origin of a powerful earthquake that rattled seven states and provinces when Ulysses S. Grant was president.

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Hackers force message on websites via US firm

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

A U.S. firm that helps connect more than 700 companies with customers through social media says a Syrian group hacked the company’s web address to upload a message to other websites.

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Device cools itself in the blazing-hot Sun

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Passive system works without the need for a power source

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Sheep flock to Eiffel Tower as French farmers cry wolf

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

French farmers flocked to the Eiffel Tower on Thursday, sheep in tow, to express their frustration over increasing attacks by wolves which some say have been "overprotected" by the government.

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Using social media for behavioral studies is cheap, fast, but fraught with biases

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

The rise of social media has seemed like a bonanza for behavioral scientists, who have eagerly tapped the social nets to quickly and cheaply gather huge amounts of data about what people are thinking and doing. But computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and McGill University warn that those massive datasets may be misleading.

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Genomes of malaria-carrying mosquitoes sequenced

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Nora Besansky, O’Hara Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame and a member of the University’s Eck Institute for Global Health, has led an international team of scientists in sequencing the genomes of 16 Anopheles mosquito species from around the world.

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Single-atom gold catalysts may offer path to low-cost production of fuel and chemicals

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

New catalysts designed and investigated by Tufts University School of Engineering researchers and collaborators from other university and national laboratories have the potential to greatly reduce processing costs in future fuels, such as hydrogen. The catalysts are composed of a unique structure of single gold atoms bound by oxygen to several sodium or potassium atoms and supported on non-reactive silica materials. They demonstrate comparable activity and stability with catalysts comprising precious metal nanoparticles on rare- earth and other reducible oxide supports when used in producing highly purified hydrogen.

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Bitter food but good medicine from cucumber genetics

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

High-tech genomics and traditional Chinese medicine come together as researchers identify the genes responsible for the intense bitter taste of wild cucumbers. Taming this bitterness made cucumber, pumpkin and their relatives into popular foods, but the same compounds also have potential to treat cancer and diabetes.

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Education is key to climate adaptation

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Given that some climate change is already unavoidable—as just confirmed by the new IPCC report—investing in empowerment through universal education should be an essential element in climate change adaptation efforts, which so far focus mostly in engineering projects, according to a new study from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) published in the journal Science.

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Study Details Presidents’ Paths From Power to Dusty Corner of Cultural Memory

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

The broader significance of the report is that societies collectively forget according to the same formula as, say, a student who has studied a list of words.

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Bulletproof graphene makes ultra-strong body armour

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Sheets of single-atom thick carbon absorb the impact of bullets more efficiently than steel, paving the way for lightweight, super-strong bulletproof vests

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Another human footprint: Rising anthropogenic nitrate levels in the North Pacific Ocean

Written By: admin - Nov• 28•14

Human-induced changes to Earth’s carbon cycle – for example, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and ocean acidification – have been observed for decades. However, a study published this week in Science showed human activities, in particular industrial and agricultural processes, have also had significant impacts on the upper ocean nitrogen cycle.

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