Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Data analytics give researchers a real-time view of carbon’s impact on the environment

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A group of Canadian and international researchers and graduate students supporting the University’s Enviro-Net project to monitor climate change are now using IBM’s InfoSphere Streams software to quickly ingest, correlate and analyze data as it arrives from more than 500 sensors implanted in some of the world’s most remote – and vulnerable – ecosystems.

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Plant immunity comes at a price

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Plants are under permanent attack by a multitude of pathogens. To win the battle against fungi, bacteria, viruses and other pathogens, they have developed a complex and effective immune system. And just as in humans, this can also overshoot its target when some of the plant’s own proteins are mistakenly identified as foreign. Such autoimmune reactions can lead to tissue defects and growth arrest, and is particularly apparent in hybrids, where two divergent immune systems meet. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, Germany, have now pinpointed the most common culprits for autoimmunity. Surprisingly, these are components of the immune system itself, which are mistakenly recognized by other immune receptors as intruders.

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Asteroid impacts on Earth make structurally bizarre diamonds

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

(Phys.org) —Scientists have argued for half a century about the existence of a form of diamond called lonsdaleite, which is associated with impacts by meteorites and asteroids. A group of scientists based mostly at Arizona State University now show that what has been called lonsdaleite is in fact a structurally disordered form of ordinary diamond.

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Research helps raise awareness of human trafficking

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Human trafficking –– or the control, ownership and sale of another human being for monetary gain –– was a common occurrence centuries ago, but many believe it doesn’t exist in this day and age and not in this country.

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From hurricanes to drought, LatAm’s volatile climate

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Sixteen years ago, Teodoro Acuna Zavala lost nearly everything when Hurricane Mitch ravaged his fields, pouring 10 days of torrential rains on Central America and killing more than 9,000 people.

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Researcher optimally isolates propylene for commercial use

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

(Phys.org) —Many people are familiar with the natural compound known as propane, used often as fuel, but less is discussed about propylene (or propene), with which propane is closely tied.

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Nintendo Tries to Energize Wii U Sales With Amiibo Toys

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A collection of toy figurines that will interact with a video game is Nintendo’s entry into an already flourishing market.

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Opinion Poll: Canada’s climate change consensus confronts Keystone

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Despite the fact that 81% of Canadians accept that temperature on Earth is increasing, Université de Montréal researchers have revealed that Canadians are generally misinformed about the science of climate change and are divided over the construction of new oil pipelines. The researchers’ study also found that 70% of Canadians perceive significant changes in weather where they live; 60% believe that weather in Canada has been getting more extreme; and 87% believe these changes are somewhat or very likely the consequence of a warming planet.

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Q&A: How to Use a VPN

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Plus, troubleshooting “file in use” messages.

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Embrace the arts, engineers told

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Engineering needs to emphasise its creative side to encourage more young people to take it up as a career, says a leading member of the profession.

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Space agency plans Mars rover from Lego bricks

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Space agency plans Mars mission with plastic bricks

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Q&A: Using a VPN

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Plus, troubleshooting “file in use” messages.

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A green transformation for pharmaceuticals

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Waste is reduced through the cheap and green development of a catalyst for the transformation of a commercially important functional group

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ESA image: Tokyo Bay, Japan from orbit

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

This image from Sentinel-1A’s radar on 11 July shows Tokyo Bay in Japan.

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Supercomputer and visualization resources lend insight into plasma dynamic

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Studying the intricacies and mysteries of the sun is physicist Wendell Horton life’s work. A widely known authority on plasma physics, his study of the high temperature gases on the sun, or plasma, consistently leads him around the world to work on a diverse range of projects that have great impact.

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Technique could let a small electrical signal change materials’ electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A new way of switching the magnetic properties of a material using just a small applied voltage, developed by researchers at MIT and collaborators elsewhere, could signal the beginning of a new family of materials with a variety of switchable properties, the researchers say.

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New 2-D quantum materials for nanoelectronics

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Researchers at MIT say they have carried out a theoretical analysis showing that a family of two-dimensional materials exhibits exotic quantum properties that may enable a new type of nanoscale electronics.

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Researchers explore future of ‘postdigital’ textbook

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

An interdisciplinary team at Arizona State University has been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation’s Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies program to conduct research on the future of the textbook.

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Police make computer hijack arrests

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Fifteen people have been arrested, including four in the UK, in connection with the hijacking of computers.

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Please clamber around the exhibit

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

The Tate Gallery goes 3D with Minecraft

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3-D printing innovation capable of making stronger, lighter metal works for auto, aerospace industries

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A Purdue innovation that produces stronger, lighter metal parts that work for the automotive and aerospace industries through a new, 3-D printing technology is being commercialized through Frontier Additive Manufacturing LLC, a Crawfordsville, Indiana-based company.

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How to keep the world’s eyes out of your webcam

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

There are concerns that thousands of private webcams around the world could be streaming live images to anybody who wishes to view them – without their owner knowing – thanks to a Russian website providing a convenient list of every camera that can be accessed.

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New semiconductor device could lead to better photodetectors

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

(Phys.org) —UCLA researchers have developed a perovskite photodetector that could reduce manufacturing costs and improve the quality of medical and commercial light sensors.

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Embrace the arts, engineers told

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Engineering needs to emphasise its creative side to encourage more young people to take it up as a career, says a leading member of the profession.

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Warnings on ‘complex’ Android virus

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Hundreds of thousands of Android phones have been infected with malware that uses handsets to send spam and buy event tickets in bulk.

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The supply doesn’t exist for California water storage expansion

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

California’s approval of a $7.5 billion water bond has bolstered prospects for expanding reservoirs and groundwater storage, but the drought-prone state can effectively use no more than a 15 percent increase in surface water storage capacity because of lack of water to fill it, according to a new analysis released Nov. 20.

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Scientists develop 3-D model of regulator protein bax

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Scientists at Freie Universität Berlin, the University of Tubingen, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH) provide a new 3D model of the protein Bax, a key regulator of cell death. When active, Bax forms pores in the membranes of mitochondria, causing the release of proteins from the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm. This in turn triggers a series of operations ending in cell death, which are often impaired in cancer cells.

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Computer hijacking arrests in UK

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Four people the UK have been arrested for allegedly being involved in hijacking computers, including spying through victims’ webcams.

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Japan orders air bag maker to conduct probe

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Japan’s transport ministry has told air bag maker Takata to conduct an internal investigation after cases of its air bags exploding triggered safety concerns in the U.S. and other countries.

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Strong undersea earthquake hits eastern Indonesia

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A strong undersea earthquake hit off the coast of eastern Indonesia on Friday, but there were no immediate reports of injuries or serious damage and officials said it was unlikely to trigger a tsunami.

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Galaxies in filaments spaced like pearls on a necklace

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

What began as a project looking at the statistics of galaxy distributions found an underlying pattern that could help astronomers learn how the universe evolved

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Embrace the arts, engineers told

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Engineering needs to emphasise its creative side to encourage more young people to take it up as a career, says a leading member of the profession.

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Algorithm, not live committee, performs author ranking

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Thousands of authors’ works enter the public domain each year, but only a small number of them end up being widely available. So how to choose the ones taking center-stage? And how well can a machine-learning algorithm rank the most notable authors in the world? Allen B. Riddell at Dartmouth College set out to deliver some answers and he published his work, "Public Domain Rank: Identifying Notable Individuals with the Wisdom of the Crowd", on the ArXiv server.

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Researchers tease out glitches in immune system’s self-recognition

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease.

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Novel regulatory mechanism for cell division found

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A protein kinase or enzyme known as PKM2 has proven to control cell division, potentially providing a molecular basis for tumor diagnosis and treatment.

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Under threat: Kenya’s iconic Nairobi national park

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

It is an image famous in a thousand postcards: giraffe, rhino and zebra pacing the savannah with city skyscrapers towering in the background.

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F.D.A. Approves Hysingla, a Powerful Painkiller

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved a long-acting opioid painkiller that contains pure hydrocodone, which some addiction experts fear will be abused.

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Ebola Spread Has Slowed in Liberia, C.D.C. Says

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The international response to the Ebola epidemic, coupled with more effective action by local communities, has stopped the exponential spread of the disease in Liberia, the C.D.C. said.

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Dot Earth Blog: Making the Most of Puberty on the Scale of a Planet

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Access to education and jobs can make the world’s huge youth population an asset.

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New 3D topological insulator is the nearest to perfection yet

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

BiSbTeSe2 behaves just how theory says it should

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Advertising: Jim Parsons, ‘Big Bang Theory’ Star, to Promote Intel as Innovator

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Mr. Parsons, who portrays the genius nerd Sheldon Cooper on the comedy series, is featured in a campaign that is scheduled to begin on Monday.

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Washington Post Releases Free App for Kindle, in First Collaboration With Amazon

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The ideas and preoccupations of Jeff Bezos, who bought The Post last year, have quietly reshaped the paper, including a new focus on international growth.

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Crowd investing opens up high finance

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

How crowd investment platforms are shaking up start-up land

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Russian site lists breached webcams

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Data privacy watchdogs are warning the public about a Russian website that provides links to breached webcams, baby monitors and CCTV feeds.

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Senators get no clear answers on air bag safety

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

There were apologies and long-winded explanations, but after nearly four hours of testimony about exploding Takata air bags, senators never got a clear answer to the question most people have: whether or not their cars are safe.

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Twitter boss launches global cash register service

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Twitter’s co-founder outlined plans to make cash registers a thing of the past on Thursday as he held a global launch for new software that he said would help small businesses grow.

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Nicaragua: Studies say canal impact to be minimal

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Officials said Thursday that studies have determined a $40 billion inter-oceanic canal across Nicaragua will have minimal impact on the environment and society, and construction is to begin next month.

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Where’s the snow? Not in Alaska’s largest city

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

One week before Thanksgiving, much of the nation is digging out from snowstorms, but the ground is bare in Alaska’s largest city.

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Former Brown dean whose group won Nobel Prize dies

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

David Greer, a doctor who co-founded a group that won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize for working to prevent nuclear war and who helped transform the medical school at Brown University, has died. He was 89.

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Glassmaker Corning toughens Gorilla Glass for smartphone screens

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

US manufacturer Corning said Thursday it was introducing a new, tougher version of its Gorilla Glass used by major smartphone makers in a bid to maintain dominance in the sector.

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VIDEO: Energy giant unveils shale gas plan

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Chemicals giant Ineos announces plans to invest up to £640m in shale gas exploration in the UK, in a bid to become the country’s leading fracking firm.

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Premier US album chart revamped to include streaming

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The Billboard chart, the benchmark for US music sales, will next week start to include streaming in its measurements to reflect the rapid growth of services such as Spotify.

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Crew finds 150-ton boulder likely left by glacier

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Workers digging an underground garage for a new hotel in Everett, Washington, recently struck something big about 30 feet below the surface.

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‘Call of Duty’ blasts past $10 bn in sales

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Blockbuster military shooter video game "Call of Duty" has blasted past $10 billion in lifetime sales, propelled by demand for the latest installment in the 11-year-old franchise.

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Uber hires team to help fix privacy issues

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Uber on Thursday scrambled to allay fears that executives at the hot car-sharing startup are gunning for journalists and spying on riders.

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Google tests replacing web ads with contributions

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Google on Thursday began rolling out a way for people to support websites they frequent and, in return, be rewarded with ad-free pages.

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YouTube goes online for second Music Awards

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The YouTube Music Awards are undergoing an overhaul for their second edition next year, scrapping a star-studded gala and instead looking at videos’ online buzz.

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Jeff Bezos Makes His Mark on Washington Post With New Kindle App

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

It is the first formal collaboration between the newspaper and Amazon since Mr. Bezos, the online giant’s founder, bought The Post for $250 million last year.

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Aggressive conifer removal benefits Sierra aspen

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

A study just published by Point Blue Conservation Science shows the benefits of an aggressive approach to restoring Sierra Nevada aspen stands (Populus tremuloides).

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Researchers create first inhibitor for enzyme linked to cancers

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Recent studies showing acid ceramidase (AC) to be upregulated in melanoma, lung and prostate cancers have made the enzyme a desired target for novel synthetic inhibitor compounds. This week in Angewandte Chemie, a top journal in chemistry, UC Irvine and Italian Institute of Technology scientists describe the very first class of AC inhibitors that may aid in the efficacy of chemotherapies.

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Intrepid scientific explorer recounts lifetime of work and adventure in Amazon

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Drawing on nearly five decades of experience, Professor Sir Ghillean Prance, one of the seminal scientific explorers of the Amazon rain forest in modern times, chronicles some of his most significant and fascinating expeditions in That Glorious Forest: Exploring the Plants and Their Indigenous Uses in Amazonia, now available from The New York Botanical Garden Press.

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Time-lapse photos and synched weather data unlock Antarctic secrets

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

In preparation for his upcoming fieldwork, Brown University research analyst Jay Dickson took 10,000 pictures of the inside of his freezer. He wasn’t investigating disappearing food or making sure the light went off when he closed the door. Dickson was making sure his new camera and timer would function properly for long periods in sub-freezing temperatures.

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Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

A new discovery about the atomic structure of uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.

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Researching the physics of cooling liquid metals adds levity to Space Station

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Sure, it’s easy to say that research in microgravity is cool, but the European Space Agency’s (ESA) new electromagnetic levitator brings new meaning to the word. A new ESA facility aboard the International Space Station will serve as a furnace capable of levitating and heating metals up to 3,632 degrees Fahrenheit. Having such a facility in microgravity will allow scientists to observe fundamental physical processes that occur as liquid metals cool.

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Deep-earth carbon offers clues on origin of life on Earth

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

New findings by a Johns Hopkins University-led team reveal long unknown details about carbon deep beneath the Earth’s surface and suggest ways this subterranean carbon might have influenced the history of life on the planet.

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UO-industry collaboration points to improved nanomaterials

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has emerged from a collaboration of University of Oregon and industry researchers.

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When vaccines are imperfect: What math can tell us about their effects on disease propagation

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The control of certain childhood diseases is difficult, despite high vaccination coverage in many countries. One of the possible reasons for this is "imperfect vaccines," that is, vaccines that fail either due to "leakiness," lack of effectiveness on certain individuals in a population, or shorter duration of potency.

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Firms pressure sales people to invest in costly internal negotiations

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

In many firms sales people spend as much time negotiating internally for lower prices as they do interacting with customers. A new study appearing in the November issue of Marketing Science, a publication of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) finds that firms should allow their sales people to "waste" energy on internal negotiations. In fact, it says, firms should make the process wasteful on purpose.

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Crowdfunding donations reinvent what a charity is

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

A growing number of non-profits are modelling themselves on technology start-ups rather than traditional charities, allowing donors to give direct to a cause

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Bits Blog: Google Play Store Opens to Chinese Developers

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Google said it would offer Chinese developers a way to sell mobile applications outside of mainland China by giving them access to its Play Store, which runs on Android phones and tablets.

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Britain urges Russia to shut down webcam spying site

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

A Russian website offering thousands of live feeds peering into bedrooms and offices around the world by accessing poorly secured webcams should be taken down immediately, British officials said on Thursday.

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Bits Blog: Malicious Software Said to Spread on Android Phones

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Lookout, a security company, says it has been tracking malware that over the last two years has become more sophisticated as it hit millions of devices.

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Observatory: Living Higher, Thanks to Barley

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

A study of ancient life on the Tibetan Plateau indicates it was the ability to grow barley that allowed humans to establish permanent settlements at very high altitudes.

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Geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

A team of researchers from Caltech and the China Earthquake Administration has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet, north of the eastern end of the Himalayas. The geologists say that the ancient canyon—thousands of feet deep in places—effectively rules out a popular model used to explain how the massive and picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast.

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China’s new ‘Great Wall’ not so great, hurting wetlands, economy

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

China’s second great wall, a vast seawall covering more than half of the country’s mainland coastline, is a foundation for financial gain – and also a dyke holding a swelling rush of ecological woes.

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Dizzying heights: Prehistoric farming on the ‘roof of the world’

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Animal teeth, bones and plant remains have helped researchers from Cambridge, China and America to pinpoint a date for what could be the earliest sustained human habitation at high altitude.

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Estimating the magnetic field of an exoplanet

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Scientists developed a new method which allows to estimate the magnetic field of a distant exoplanet, i.e., a planet, which is located outside the Solar system and orbits a different star. Moreover, they managed to estimate the value of the magnetic moment of the planet HD 209458b.The group of scientists including one of the researchers of the Lomonosov State University published their article in the Science magazine.

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Evolution: The genetic connivances of digits and genitals

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

During the development of mammals, the growth and organization of digits are orchestrated by Hox genes, which are activated very early in precise regions of the embryo. These "architect genes" are themselves regulated by a large piece of adjacent DNA. A study led by Denis Duboule, professor at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland, reveals that this same DNA regulatory sequence also controls the architect genes during the development of the external genitals.

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Google, Rockstar settle patent suit

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Google and patent consortium Rockstar – which includes Apple as an investor – agree to settle a patent litigation suit.

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Feminist Hacker Barbie

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Internet users create a web app to edit the pages of a controversial Barbie book.

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Ineos in $1bn bid to become UK’s biggest fracking firm

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Swiss-based petrochemical firm Ineos launched plans Thursday to become the biggest player in Britain’s fracking sector with a $1.0-billion investment in the nation’s shale gas industry.

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Astronauts to get ‘ISSpresso’ coffee machine

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Ristretto or lungo? Not a question astronauts on the International Space Station normally have to contemplate, but that is about to change thanks to a new zero-gravity coffee machine being delivered this weekend.

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Square’s point-of-sale service goes global

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Financial services startup Square is taking aim at cash registers across the globe, making its point-of-sale software available internationally in English, Spanish, French and Japanese.

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NOAA: Globe sets fifth hottest-month record of 2014

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Despite a bitter U.S. cold snap, the globe is rushing hell-bent toward its warmest year on record with last month setting the fifth monthly heat record of year.

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Amazon offers Washington Post app on Kindle

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Amazon said Thursday it will offer a free Washington Post app to Kindle users for six months, a move highlighting the digital strategy for the newspaper owned by Jeff Bezos.

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GPM measured Tropical Storm Adjali’s rainfall before dissipation

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Moderate rainfall was occurring around the center of Tropical Storm Adjali before it dissipated, according to data from NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM satellites.

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Study: Volunteering can help save wildlife

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Participation of non-scientists as volunteers in conservation can play a significant role in saving wildlife, finds a new scientific research led by Duke University, USA, in collaboration with Wildlife Conservation Society and Centre for Wildlife Studies, Bengaluru.

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Scientists show salinity counts when it comes to sea level

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Using ocean observations and a large suite of climate models, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have found that long-term salinity changes have a stronger influence on regional sea level changes than previously thought.

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Quantum mechanical calculations reveal the hidden states of enzyme active sites

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Enzymes carry out fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and respiration, with the help of clusters of metal atoms as "active" sites. But scientists lack basic information about their function because the states thought to be critical to their chemical abilities cannot be experimentally observed.

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It’s filamentary: How galaxies evolve in the cosmic web

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

How do galaxies like our Milky Way form, and just how do they evolve? Are galaxies affected by their surrounding environment? An international team of researchers, led by astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, proposes some answers.

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Bits Blog: Malicious Software Said to Spread on Android Phones

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Lookout, a security company, says it has been tracking malware that over the last two years has become more sophisticated as it hit millions of devices.

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Bits Blog: Facebook Shuttle Bus Drivers Vote to Unionize

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The bus drivers say they are inadequately paid and endure a stressful work schedule of split shifts.

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Darwin 2.0: Scientists shed new light on how species diverge

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Birds that are related, such as Darwin’s finches, but that vary in beak size and behavior specially evolved to their habitat are examples of a process called speciation. It has long been thought that dramatic changes in a landscape like the formation of the Andes Mountain range or the Amazon River is the main driver that initiates species to diverge. However, a recent study shows that speciation occurred much later than these dramatic geographical changes. Researchers from LSU’s Museum of Natural Science have found that time and a species’ ability to move play greater parts in the process of speciation. This research was published today in the print edition of Nature.

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Revealing political partisanship a bad idea on resumes

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Displaced political aides looking for a new, nonpartisan job in the wake of the midterm power shuffle may fare better if they tone down any political references on their resumes, finds a new study from Duke University.

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Mediterranean meteorological tide has increased by over a millimetre a year since 1989

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

A new database developed by the University of Cantabria (Spain) provides data on sea level variation due to atmospheric changes in the south of Europe between 1948 and 2009. Over the last two decades sea levels have increased in the Mediterranean basin.

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3-D printer powered up on the International Space Station

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

This week, NASA took a big step toward changing the way we plan for long-duration space voyages when astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore successfully installed and prepared the first 3-D printer for upcoming manufacturing operations on the International Space Station.

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Biomarker could provide early warning of kidney disease in cats

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Researchers from Oregon State University and other institutions have developed a new biomarker called "SDMA" that can provide earlier identification of chronic kidney disease in cats, which is one of the leading causes of their death.

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Don’t get hacked! Research shows how much we ignore online warnings

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Say you ignored one of those "this website is not trusted" warnings and it led to your computer being hacked. How would you react? Would you:

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From cognition to control: Fundamental research continues to advance cooperative robots

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

From disaster recovery to caring for the elderly in the home, scientists and engineers are developing robots that can handle critical tasks in close proximity to humans, safely and with greater resilience than previous generations of intelligent machines.

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Scientists discover novel metamaterial properties within hexagonal boron nitride

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Manchester, U.K.; Imperial College, London; University of California San Diego; and the National Institute of Material Science (NIMS), Japan, have demonstrated that confined surface phonon polaritons within hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) exhibit unique metamaterial properties that enable novel nanoscale optical devices for use in optical communications, super-resolution imaging and improved infrared cameras and detectors.

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