Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Pacific plate shrinking as it cools: Calculations challenge assumptions about rigid lithosphere

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

The tectonic plate that dominates the Pacific "Ring of Fire" is not as rigid as many scientists assume, according to researchers at Rice University and the University of Nevada.

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Study identifies upside to financial innovations

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Financial innovations can make or break an economy. While the negative impact of financial innovation has been extensively covered, a new study of financial innovations before and during the last financial crisis indicates that financial innovations are not all bad. Many provide positive returns, especially in the United States. However, those that are easy for consumers to understand provide the best returns for investors.

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The roots of human altruism

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Scientists have long been searching for the factor that determines why humans often behave so selflessly. It was known that humans share this tendency with species of small Latin American primates of the family Callitrichidae (tamarins and marmosets), leading some to suggest that cooperative care for the young, which is ubiquitous in this family, was responsible for spontaneous helping behavior. But it was not so clear what other primate species do in this regard, because most studies were not comparable.

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Light of life

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

A fluorescent microscopic view of cells from a type of bone cancer, being studied for a future trip to deep space – aiming to sharpen our understanding of the hazardous radiation prevailing out there.

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How to prevent organic food fraud

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

A growing number of consumers are willing to pay a premium for fruits, vegetables and other foods labelled "organic", but whether they’re getting what the label claims is another matter. Now scientists studying conventional and organic tomatoes are devising a new way to make sure farms are labelling their produce appropriately. Their report, which appears in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, could help prevent organic food fraud.

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Millions knocked offline in US

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

A fault on Time Warner Cable’s network has left its 11.4 million broadband internet subscribers without a connection.

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Leading scientists call for a stop to non-essential use of fluorochemicals

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

A number of leading international researchers, amongst others from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, recommend that fluorochemicals are only used where they are absolutely essential, until better methods exist to measure the chemicals and more is known about their potentially harmful effects. The recommendation appears in the Helsingør Statement following an international conference.

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Sentinel-1 poised to monitor motion

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Although it was only launched a few months ago and is still being commissioned, the new Sentinel-1A radar satellite has already shown that it can be used to generate 3D models of Earth’s surface and will be able to closely monitor land and ice surface deformation.

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Piglet weaning age no bar to litter frequency

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

University of Adelaide research has shown that piglets can be weaned later with no negative effects on sow birthing frequency.

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Time Warner Cable says outages largely resolved

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Time Warner Cable said Wednesday service was largely restored after a problem that occurred during routine maintenance caused a nationwide outage of its Internet service for hours.

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Maker of $33 smartphone hails ‘new era’ for India

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

The maker of a new $33 smartphone billed as India’s cheapest said Wednesday it aims to sell half a million in the next three months in what it called a "new era" for the market.

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The devastating spread of the mountain pine beetle

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

When the mountain pine beetle began blazing a path across forests in British Columbia and Alberta, nobody could have imagined the extent of the damage to come. But as the insect devastated pine forests and disrupted communities, forest industries, recreational use, watersheds, and plant and wildlife habitats, the problem became disturbingly clear. Now, as the beetle creeps into the boreal forests of the Northwest Territories and Saskatchewan, with a real concern it may reach as far east as the Maritime provinces, researchers at the University of Alberta have responded to calls from government, industry, non-profit organizations and the general public to help conserve and protect an invaluable national resource at the heart of Canadian identity.

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Potential therapy for the Sudan strain of Ebola could help contain some future outbreaks

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Ebola is a rare, but deadly disease that exists as five strains, none of which have approved therapies. One of the most lethal strains is the Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Although not the strain currently devastating West Africa, SUDV has caused widespread illness, even as recently as 2012. In a new study appearing in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, researchers now report a possible therapy that could someday help treat patients infected with SUDV.

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Researchers film protein quake for the first time

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

One of nature’s mysteries is how plants survive impact by the huge amounts of energy contained in the sun’s rays, while using this energy for photosynthesis. The hypothesis is that the light-absorbing proteins in the plant’s blades quickly dissipate the energy throughout the entire protein molecule through so-called protein quakes. Researchers at DTU Physics have now managed to successfully ‘film’ this process.

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Measurement at Big Bang conditions confirms lithium problem

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

The field of astrophysics has a stubborn problem and it’s called lithium. The quantities of lithium predicted to have resulted from the Big Bang are not actually present in stars. But the calculations are correct – a fact which has now been confirmed for the first time in experiments conducted at the underground laboratory in the Gran Sasso mountain in Italy. As part of an international team, researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) studied how much lithium forms under Big Bang conditions. The results were published in Physical Review Letters.

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NASA image: Happy Camp and July Fire Complexes in California

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

As of seven hours ago the Happy Camp Complex of fires had consumed 24,939 acres of land in Northern California, the July complex had consumed 35,530 as of eight hours ago.

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Paleontologists describe a possible dinosaur nest and young ‘babysitter’

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Dinosaurs are often depicted as giant, frightening beasts. But every creature is a baby once.

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Life in Lego: how mini-figure academics went viral

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Donna Yates explains how her Lego female scientists became a Twitter hit

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Dropbox offers 1TB Pro plan for $9.99

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Dropbox is consolidating its three Pro account options into a single plan that’s priced at $9.99 per month and includes 1TB of storage and added controls for document sharing and security.The Pro plan is aimed at freelancers, contractors and other workers who want more storage and tools than come with the free Basic plan, which starts at 2GB, but for whom a Business account might be overkill.

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Salesforce renames and revamps Communities service

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Salesforce.com has renamed and updated its Communities product, which lets companies build social websites where employees, partners and customers can mingle and collaborate.Now called Salesforce1 Community Cloud, the service has been updated in several areas including the profile and topic pages, and its mobile access.

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Star Trek X Prize finalists named

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Ten groups have been chosen as finalists in a $10m (£6m) competition to develop a real-life "tricorder" – the medical scanner used in Star Trek.

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Server sales have turned a corner, IDC says

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Server sales have picked up after a long slow spell and are likely to stay buoyant well into 2015 and beyond, IDC said Tuesday. The growth last quarter was modest — worldwide server revenue climbed just 2.5 percent from a year earlier — but server makers will welcome the news after five consecutive quarters of declines.

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Researchers study gallium to design adjustable electronic components

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Gallium is one of the few metals that turns into a liquid at room temperature. When that happens, its surface oxidizes, forming a "skin" over the fluid, almost like a water balloon or a water bed. Years ago, scientists often thought the coating a nuisance. Today they consider it an opportunity.

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Video: A (Very) Basic Twitch Users Guide

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

A guide to the site for the nongamer.

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VIDEO: Taps run dry amid California drought

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

California has been hit by its worst drought in a century and many say the problem is only going to get worse.

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Bits Blog: Google Buys Zync, Maker of Visual Effects Software

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

The Internet giant is adding specialized technology to its cloud computing services.

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Bits Blog: AT&T Mobility Names a New Chief Executive

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

AT&T, the No. 2 carrier in the United States, said it had given promotions to two major executives, including the chief executive of its wireless business.

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Researchers suggest rate of evolution change can explain discrepancy between molecular clocks and fossil evidence

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

(Phys.org) —A pair of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Australia, believe they may have found a way to solve the discrepancy problem that exists between molecular biologists and paleontologists who disagree on the likely first appearance of placental mammals. They describe their new dating approach, which they call a "morphological clock" in their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.

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Call for Facebook beheadings rethink

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

One of Facebook’s safety advisers is calling on it to cover decapitation photos with warnings after controversial uploads from Syria.

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Astronomers find evidence of water clouds in brown dwarf atmosphere

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers, led by space scientist Jacqueline Faherty, has found evidence of water clouds in the atmosphere of a brown dwarf situated just 7.3 light years away. In their paper to be published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, the team describes how they found evidence of the water clouds and where the research is headed next.

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Spider personality study shows evidence of ‘social niche specialization’

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers with the University of Pittsburgh (and one from the Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm, Germany) has found evidence of "social niche specialization" in a species of social spiders. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the team describes how they experimented with 84 artificially created colonies of the spiders and what they learned about their behavior as a result.

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Gifts that generate gratitude keep customers loyal

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

They promise us discounts, upgrades and freebies in exchange for our allegiance – so why are shoppers failing to stay faithful to customer loyalty programs?

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NASA completes successful battery of tests on composite cryotank

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

NASA has completed a complex series of tests on one of the largest composite cryogenic fuel tanks ever manufactured, bringing the aerospace industry much closer to designing, building, and flying lightweight, composite tanks on rockets.

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EMC gives VMware admins the reins to replication and recovery

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

EMC is putting replication and recovery into the hands of VMware administrators with a software version of its RecoverPoint appliance that’s designed for cloud computing. The new tool, RecoverPoint for Virtual Machines, works within the VMware vCenter management platform and can use storage from any vendor, EMC announced Tuesday at VMworld in San Francisco. The system can span direct-attached storage, network-attached storage and storage area networks. RecoverPoint for VMs is due to be available in October. Support for other hypervisors will come later, the company said.

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How parents can help their children succeed and stay in school

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

(Phys.org) —Students are back in school and now is the time for parents to develop routines to help their children succeed academically. Kimberly Greder, an associate professor and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach family life specialist, says parental involvement, more than income or social status, is a predictor of student achievement.

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Salmon are recolonising newly reconnected zones in the rivers of the Adour basin

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Researchers from INRA, Laval University in Quebec, CIRAD and the Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour have studied the impact of constructing passes that allow salmon to cross hydroelectric dams and recolonise newly reconnected zones in the Adour basin. Using population genetics tools, they have shown that the sources of this recolonisation are very probably the sectors downstream of these passes and that little genetic diversity is lost during recolonisation of the newly available zones. These results suggest a strong potential for the evolution of these newly formed populations.

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VMware extends virtual workspaces to mobile devices

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

VMware has assembled a package that combines its desktop virtualization software with its tools for managing mobile devices, giving administrators a unified suite to manage all of their end-users’ application requirements. The company launched the VMware Workspace Suite at VMworld, being held this week in San Francisco.

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VIDEO: Buddleia: Gardener’s friend or foe?

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

BBC Newsnight’s Stephen Smith visits Dover to assess how much of a threat buddleia is to native species

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Surface Pro 3 not overheating but needs a software fix, Microsoft says

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Microsoft said Tuesday it will issue an update for Surface Pro 3 tablets, a small number of which show an error indicating a temperature problem. Users have complained that the company’s latest tablet gets too hot to touch and its fan occasionally becomes loud.

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Climate impacts of changing aerosol emissions since 1996

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

The re-distribution of anthropogenic aerosol emissions from Europe and North America towards China and India between 1996 and 2010 has surprisingly warmed rather than cooled the global climate. This result reinforces the notion that the recent hiatus in global warming is mainly caused by internal variability of the climate.

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As Online Video Surges, the .TV Domain Rides the Wave

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

The domain, owned by Tuvalu, a tiny South Pacific island nation, signals how people watch TV now — online and on apps — and makes the country a tidy sum, too.

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Charting the Rise of Twitch

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Twitch’s peak viewership now rivals the average prime-time viewership of some cable networks.

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Spot ET’s waste heat for chance to find alien life

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

A new approach to the search for intelligent aliens looks for the heat from galaxy-spanning technology – and may have found some promising candidates

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Meeting the human faces of the internet’s dark places

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Jamie Bartlett’s encounters with the characters behind subversive currencies and online erotica make fascinating reading, but The Dark Net is really about us

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Esports: Boot camps give gaming teams the vital edge

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Pro gaming is such big business that top teams approach competition like athletes do, even setting up training camps where gamers work out and bond

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Esports: Speedrunning turns any game into a sprint

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Speedrunning – finishing a game in double-quick time – is one way to get into competing for prizes, and less famous games have their own contests, too

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Esports: Live from the world’s biggest esports event

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Mark Harris sees adoring crowds, fire jets and glitter bombs usher in the finalists at the world’s most prestigious esports tournament

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Watch a swarm of 1000 mini-robots assemble into shapes

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

The world’s largest robotic swarm can autonomously form complex 2D shapes like stars or letters of the alphabet

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Esports: See the greatest moment in pro gaming history

Written By: admin - Aug• 28•14

Japanese competitor Daigo Umehara pulled off an incredible series of moves in a now-legendary esports Street Fighter III match in 2004

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Federal stimulus fails to protect college affordability, study finds

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

While state lawmakers honored provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 by not slashing their appropriations for higher education during the recent economic crisis, a new analysis by higher education expert Jennifer A. Delaney indicates that the stimulus program may have failed to promote college access and affordability.

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Study provides new look at ancient coastline, pathway for early Americans

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

The first humans who ventured into North America crossed a land bridge from Asia that is now submerged beneath the Bering Sea, and then may have traveled down the West Coast to occupy sites in Oregon and elsewhere as long as 14,000 to 15,000 years ago.

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Graphene reinvents the future

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

For many scientists, the discovery of one-atom-thick sheets of graphene is hugely significant, something with the potential to affect just about every aspect of human activity and endeavour.

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Solar Dynamics Observatory captures images of a late summer flare

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

On Aug. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 8:16 a.m. EDT.

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Study redefines ecological model: Competition among species can cause geographical isolation

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

In a study that could alter traditional notions in the fields of ecology and evolutionary biology, three City College of New York researchers present results indicating that competition between two species can lead to the geographic isolation of one of them. The finding by biologists Eliecer E. Gutiérrez, Robert A. Boria and Robert P. Anderson is the cover story in the August issue of the Swedish-published journal "Ecography" under the title, "Can biotic interactions cause allopatry? Niche models, competition, and distributions of South American mouse opossums."

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In sync and in control? Marching in unison makes men feel more formidable

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

(Phys.org) —In the aftermath of the Aug. 9 shooting of an 18-year-old African American man by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, much of the nation’s attention has been focused on how law enforcement’s use of military gear might have inflamed tensions.

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Gadolinium-based material that can be cooled by varying magnetic field

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Magnetic refrigeration is attracting attention as an efficient way to chill sensitive scientific instruments. This refrigeration method exploits the magnetocaloric effect, in which an external magnetic field controls the temperature of a magnetic material. Effective magnetic refrigerants are often difficult to prepare, but now Andy Hor of the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering and the National University of Singapore and his colleagues have created a powerful magnetic refrigerant that is easy to make in the lab.

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Godzilla stomps back in ultra HD, wires intact

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

At a humble Tokyo laboratory, Godzilla, including the 1954 black-and-white original, is stomping back with a digital makeover that delivers four times the image quality of high definition.

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Museum specimens, modern cities show how an insect pest will respond to climate change

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that century-old museum specimens hold clues to how global climate change will affect a common insect pest that can weaken and kill trees – and the news is not good.

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Dismantling ships and the trajectory of steel

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Tell me how you dismantle a ship, and I’ll tell how a region can prosper from its steel! This could be the motto of this master’s cycle at ENAC during which the projects of two civil engineering students gathered extensive data on the largest dismantling port in the world: Alang in India.

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Firm says Lohan case ‘for publicity’

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Grand Theft Auto makers say Lindsay Lohan is suing them for "publicity purposes" after she took them to court over image rights.

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Study reveals young children’s insights into food access and wealth

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

A new study by Murdoch University education researchers has highlighted the sophistication of young children’s ideas about access to food in terms of wealth and poverty.

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Optical microscope technique confirmed as valid nano-measurement tool

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

(Phys.org) —Recent experiments have confirmed that a technique developed several years ago at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) can enable optical microscopes to measure the three-dimensional (3-D) shape of objects at nanometer-scale resolution—far below the normal resolution limit for optical microscopy (about 250 nanometers for green light). The results could make the technique a useful quality control tool in the manufacture of nanoscale devices such as next-generation microchips.

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Priority Protected Areas key to dieback framework

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

A new framework to help combat Phytophthora, or dieback in Western Australia’s south-west was recently revealed at a conference at Murdoch University.

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Experiments explain why some liquids are ‘fragile’ and others are ‘strong’

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

(Phys.org) —Only recently has it become possible to accurately "see" the structure of a liquid. Using X-rays and a high-tech apparatus that holds liquids without a container, Kenneth Kelton, PhD, the Arthur Holly Compton Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, was able to compare the behavior of glass-forming liquids as they approach the glass transition.

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When an exciton acts like a hole

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

(Phys.org) —When is an electron hole like a quasiparticle (QP)? More specifically, what happens when a single electron hole is doped into a two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet? Quasiparticle phenomena in such a system are predicted by theory, but have eluded observation, complicating the understanding of electron behavior in high-temperature superconducting cuprates. A team of experimenters working at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory have taken a different approach to the problem with their recent observation of an excitonic quasiparticle in strontium iridate (Sr2IrO4), a quasi-two-dimensional, spin-1/2, antiferromagnetic Mott insulator. Their work was published in Nature Communications.

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Local model better describes lunar gravity

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Two satellites orbiting the Moon as a part of NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission have been mapping its inner structure by measuring subtle shifts in the pull of gravity on the satellites from points on the ground below. The stronger the shift, the greater is the mass of structures below the surface.

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New concerns over Iceland volcano

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

The magma from Iceland’s Bardarbunga volcano could be heading towards another large volcanic system, scientists say.

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Lockheed Martin in space junk deal

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

US defence giant Lockheed Martin is teaming up with an Australian technology firm to track space debris that can damage multi-billion dollar satellites.

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Hackerspaces used to turn ideas turn into reality

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

At HeatSync Labs, the tables are littered with computer chips, pens, pads and tools while the room is abuzz with the chatter of would-be inventors hoping to change the world—or just make cool things. They are part of a growing global movement of so-called hackerspaces.

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China team takes on tech challenge of supercavitation

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Shanghai passenger to captain: Excuse me sir, how long until we reach San Francisco? I don’t know if I have enough time to watch a movie. Captain: You might just make it. A little under two hours.

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China Telecom profit rises as mobile data grows

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

China Telecom Ltd., one of the country’s three main state-owned carriers, said Wednesday its profit rose 11.8 percent in the first half of the year as its Internet and mobile data businesses grew.

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Hungary strives to be central Europe’s start-up capital by 2020

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

From a sleek, modern office in the middle of Budapest’s old town, Ustream provides live video streaming to clients such as Samsung and Sony.

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Lockheed Martin in space junk deal

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

US defence giant Lockheed Martin is teaming up with an Australian technology firm to track space debris that can damage multi-billion dollar satellites.

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Biotech firm’s GM mosquitoes to fight dengue in Brazil

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

It’s a dry winter day in southeast Brazil, but a steamy tropical summer reigns inside the labs at Oxitec, where workers are making an unusual product: genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue fever.

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Snapchat valued at $10 bln

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

US media on Tuesday reported that Snapchat was valued at $10 billion based on funding pumped into the startup by a powerhouse Silicon Valley venture capital firm.

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New scientific review investigates potential influences on recent UK winter floods

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

A comprehensive review of all potential factors behind the 2013/2014 UK winter floods is published today in the journal Nature Climate Change. The paper does not definitively answer whether human activity played a role in the magnitude of the winter flood events. It does, though, examine how factors such as the state of the global oceans may have interacted with wind patterns and subsequent high-level atmospheric features.

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Japan lab unable to replicate ‘stem cell’ findings

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Researchers in Japan have been unable to replicate experiments that were hailed earlier this year as a "game-changer" in the quest to grow transplant tissue, amid claims evidence was faked, a report said Wednesday.

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What lit up the universe?

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

New research from UCL shows we will soon uncover the origin of the ultraviolet light that bathes the cosmos, helping scientists understand how galaxies were built.

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What lit up the universe?

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

New research from UCL shows we will soon uncover the origin of the ultraviolet light that bathes the cosmos, helping scientists understand how galaxies were built.The study published today in the Astrophysical Journal Letters by UCL cosmologists Dr. Andrew Pontzen and Dr. Hiranya Peiris, together with collaborators at Princeton and Barcelona universities, shows how forthcoming astronomical surveys will reveal what lit up the cosmos.

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In India, an App for Chats and for Keeping Secrets

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

The Hike instant messaging system lets users filter information to cloak aspects of their social lives from their parents.

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W.H.O. Moves Team in Sierra Leone After a Medical Worker Contracts Ebola

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

A day after announcing a reinvigorated commitment in the country, the World Health Organization said it had removed its Ebola response team after an epidemiologist came down with the virus.

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Dot Earth Blog: A Closer Look at Turbulent Oceans and Greenhouse Heating

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Climate science homes in on the oceans’ role in driving wiggles in global warming.

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Obama Pursuing Climate Accord in Lieu of Treaty

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

To sidestep Senate approval, President Obama’s negotiators are devising what they call a “politically binding” deal to “name and shame” countries into cutting their emissions.

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As Online Video Surges, the .TV Domain Rides the Wave

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

The domain, owned by Tuvalu, a tiny South Pacific island nation, signals how people watch TV now — online and on apps — and makes the country a tidy sum, too.

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VIDEO: How sheepdogs control unruly flocks

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

A farmer explains his relationship with his sheepdog, after researchers help unravel the mystery of how the animals do their job.

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Speed and Spectators Lead to a Gaming Nexus

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Twitch.tv, bought by Amazon for over $1 billion, flourished with increasing data speeds and a budding community, taking over the start-up that created it.

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California’s Embrace of Anti-Theft Technology in Smartphones Puts a Squeeze on Thieves

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

The devices, which allow an owner to remotely deactivate a phone that has been stolen, appear to have been a factor in a decline in thefts.

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A sheepdog’s ‘two rules’ for success

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Scientists produce a simple mathematical model that explains how a single sheepdog can herd a large number of sheep.

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Evidence for Supernovas Near Earth

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

A NASA sounding rocket has confirmed that the solar system is inside an ancient supernova remnant. Life on Earth survived despite the nearby blasts.

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Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered. The findings could lead to the development of robots that can gather and herd livestock, crowd control techniques, or new methods to clean up the environment.

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Bits Blog: California Governor Signs Law Requiring a ‘Kill Switch’ on Smartphones

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

The law requires smartphones sold in California to include antitheft technology, a feature that lawmakers hope will lead to a cool down in phone theft, now the hottest urban crime.

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Tunisia’s first video games boss

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

‘I want to build something with a global reach’

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Animals first flex their muscles

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

An unusual new fossil discovery of one of the earliest animals on earth may also provide the oldest evidence of muscle tissue – the bundles of cells that make movement in animals possible.

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Bits Blog: Google Buys Zync, Maker of Visual Effects Software

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

The Internet giant is adding specialized technology to its cloud computing services.

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Bits Blog: AT&T Mobility Names a New Chief Executive

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

AT&T, the No. 2 carrier in the United States, said it had given promotions to two major executives, including the chief executive of its wireless business.

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Bits Blog: Judge Rejects Settlement Proposal in HP’s Autonomy Suit

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

On Monday, a judge ruled out a deal that would have given the lawyers suing Hewlett-Packard over its Autonomy deal perhaps $66 million while ordering changes in corporate governance.

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Dot Earth Blog: A Closer Look at Turbulent Oceans and Greenhouse Heating

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

Climate science homes in on the oceans’ role in driving wiggles in global warming.

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VMware beefs up desktop suite with help from AirWatch, Google, Nvidia

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

There’s nothing Amazon can have that others can’t try to take away, as today’s VMworld event sees the introduction of the VMware Workplace Suite — a combined platform to deploy and manage applications and desktops from the cloud to laptops, smartphones, tablets, or whatever. 

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Collaboration aims to reduce, treat vision problems in astronauts

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

To reduce and better treat spaceflight-induced visual impairment, University of Houston (UH) optometrists are collaborating on a NASA study that examines ocular changes seen in a number of astronauts.

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Bits Blog: California Governor Signs Law Requiring a ‘Kill Switch’ on Smartphones

Written By: admin - Aug• 27•14

The law requires smartphones sold in California to include antitheft technology, a feature that lawmakers hope will lead to a cool down in phone theft, now the hottest urban crime.

Read more here