Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Disaster expert identifies nine ways robots can protect Ebola workers

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

Dr. Robin R. Murphy, Raytheon Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering and director of the Center for Robot Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR) has identified nine ways robots can protect Ebola workers. Murphy also cautions that military and civilian robots often do not directly transfer to disaster situations and more work is needed to identify the use cases for robots.

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Millions hit in Drupal hack attack

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

Software firm Drupal warns millions to "assume" they have been hacked if they have not applied a patch for a recently discovered bug.

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Youth snap parents into political-rearing mode, says study

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

Parents are more reactive than proactive when providing political influence and opportunities for their children, according to a study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

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A quantum leap in nanoparticle efficiency

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

(Phys.org) —New research has unlocked the secrets of efficiency in nanomaterials, that is, materials with very tiny particles, which will improve the future development of chemical sensors used in chemical and engineering industries.

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Volunteering in Australia worth $290 billion a year

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

The monetary value of volunteering in Australia is worth much more than originally calculated, new figures from Flinders University researcher Lisel O’Dwyer show.

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Researcher studies why gender-based violence persists in Namibia

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

When the Parliament of Namibia passed the Combating of Rape Act in 2000, it was seen as progressive legislation to combat gender-based violence in a nation scarred by the effects of war in the shadow of apartheid.

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Researchers focus on medical applications rather than food safety in response to customer needs

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

When Sunny Shah and his research colleagues at the University of Notre Dame developed a new diagnostic tool for detecting the presence of bacteria, viruses and other pathogens, they assumed that the food industry would be the perfect market.

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You’re the Boss Blog: Small Businesses Assess Their Apple Pay Options

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

So far, a payment-processing executive said, businesses fall into one of three buckets: “those who actively want to use it, those who are exploring it and those that want to wait and see.”

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Sony Reports Narrower Second-Quarter Loss Than Estimated

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

Strong sales of its PlayStation 4 games console reduced the impact of its sluggish smartphone division.

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Researchers find homelessness is declining

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

Homelessness across the United States continues to decline, according to a new report to Congress co-authored by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy & Practice.

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Literature searches benefit from location tagging

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

Agricultural Research Service ecologist Jason Karl is creating new options for helping researchers to conduct literature searches that go beyond using traditional search terms such as keywords or authors. With the help of a diverse team of collaborators, he has developed a search engine called "JournalMap" that uses research locations and physical site variables to identify scientific papers of interest.

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Researchers improve how a peptide can be delivered to the diseased heart tissue of mice via nanotechnology

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

School of Medicine researchers have developed a new formula for delivering the therapeutic peptide apelin to heart tissue. The delivery system, which dramatically increases the peptide’s stability, shows promise for treating heart disease in humans, the researchers said.

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Research on cell biology mystery may reveal root causes of Alzheimer’s and other diseases

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

(Phys.org) —In the 1980s, professor Leonard Rome and his then-postdoctoral fellow Nancy Kedersha made a breakthrough in cell biology when they discovered vaults, naturally occurring nanoparticles—of a size measured in nanometers (1 nanometer = 1 billionth of a meter)—that are composed mostly of proteins and number in the thousands inside every cell of the body.

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Trout trick-or-treat: Fish gobble furry animals with four feet

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

Freshwater fish with bellies full of shrews – one trout a few years back was found to have eaten 19 – aren’t as random as scientists have thought.

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Scientists create mouse model to accelerate research on Ebola vaccines, treatments

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

In the war against Ebola, one important hurdle has just been cleared – by a mouse.

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Grad student’s aTmCam offers cosmic insight for dark energy survey

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

As a child peering through her toy telescope, Texas A&M University graduate student Ting Li was fascinated by the Moon and constellations – not so much by their cosmic beauty, but about why they exist in the first place.

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Oxygen levels were only 0.1 percent of today’s levels for roughly billion years before rise of animals

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

(Phys.org) —Geologists are letting the air out of a nagging mystery about the development of animal life on Earth.

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Hungary’s Orban says will scrap draft internet tax law

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban on Friday said he was scrapping a draft Internet tax law that has sparked mass demonstrations in the central European country.

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Hungary scraps controversial web tax

Written By: admin - Nov• 01•14

Hungary shelves a proposed tax on internet data traffic after tens of thousands of Hungarians marched against it.

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Hungary shelves toxic internet tax

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Hungary shelves a proposed tax on internet data traffic after tens of thousands of Hungarians marched against it.

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Sony’s quarterly loss balloons on mobile woes

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Sony’s losses ballooned to 136 billion yen ($1.2 billion) last quarter as the Japanese electronics and entertainment company’s troubled mobile phone division reported huge red ink.

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Co-creator of Android mobile software leaves Google

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Google on Thursday confirmed that an executive behind leading mobile device software Android is leaving the company to create an incubator for hardware startups.

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China web users laud Apple boss for coming out

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Apple chief Tim Cook’s announcement of his homosexuality was the top topic on Chinese Internet forums Friday, with many users lauding him as a hero—and some joking about his declaration.

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Australia set to pay polluters to cut emissions

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Australia is set to approve measures giving polluters financial incentives to reduce emissions blamed for climate change, in a move critics described as ineffective environmental policy.

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Synthetic lethality offers a new approach to kill tumor cells, explains Moffitt researcher

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins. A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain drugs. Alan F. List, MD, president and CEO of Moffitt Cancer Center, co-authored an article on synthetic lethality featured in the Oct. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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NYU research: Majority of high school seniors favor more liberal marijuana policies

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The study analyzed adolescents’ positions toward marijuana decriminalization and legalization. In the analysis, Palamar identifies how positions toward various marijuana policies differ by gender, race, political affiliation and religion. He also examined how lifetime and recent marijuana use relate to such positions.

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Sexual fantasies: Are you normal?

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Hoping for sex with two women is common but fantasizing about golden showers is not. That’s just one of the findings from a research project that scientifically defines sexual deviation for the first time ever.

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ESA Frontiers November preview

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Connectivity cost calculations for conservation corridors, crop companions, jellyfish and human well-being and micromanaging microbes.

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Liberia’s Ebola Crisis Puts President in Harsh Light

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

As Liberia’s first elected leader after a devastating civil war, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has pushed the country to economic growth, but gains have been halted by the Ebola outbreak.

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Tech-industry perks long associated with Bay Area being replicated across LA

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

How does an old-fashioned print-era company – formerly known as the Yellow Pages – attract top talent to its offices as it tries to remake itself as an online local search company? For those who live in hip parts LA, the company now called YP has an answer it borrowed from Silicon Valley: the luxury bus.

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Bits Blog: Andy Rubin, Former Head of Android, Departs Google

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The Google executive, who was in charge of the company’s robotics group and spearheaded the Android operating system, will start a tech incubator focused on hardware.

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In U.S. Cleanup Efforts, Accident at Nuclear Site Points to Cost of Lapses

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

As the United States aims to correct years of mishandling radioactive materials, the price of reopening a New Mexico waste repository could top $551 million.

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Newt flesh fungus ‘brought by pets’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A skin-eating fungus threatens salamanders and newts across Europe, and probably arrived on pet amphibians imported from Asia.

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Plasmons convert light into a voltage

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Discovery of "plasmoelectric effect" could lead to new solar cells

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Common Sense: Apple Chief Tim Cook’s Coming Out: ‘This Will Resonate’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Mr. Cook said the trade-off to his own privacy was worthwhile, “if hearing that the C.E.O. of Apple is gay can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is.”

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A WW2 technology ‘Plan B’ for GPS

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Technology developed during World War Two is to be used as a back-up for GPS in ports across England and Scotland.

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‘Proud to Be Gay’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Mr. Cook, Apple’s chief executive, is by far the most prominent executive of a public company to openly declare his homosexuality.

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Twitter Appoints Product Chief, Replacing One Named 6 Months Ago

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Twitter said it had picked Kevin Weil to speed its sluggish efforts to make its social network easier and more compelling for new and old users.

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Will Apple Pay be mobile pay’s kick-start?

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

If anyone can get us to use our smartphones as wallets, it’s Apple. That’s what experts think about the recent launch of Apple Pay, the first mobile wallet to work on an iPhone.

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Fashion challenge for Apple’s Ive

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Can Apple design guru Jony Ive turn the smartwatch into a hit?

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VIDEO: Lab for world’s worst animal viruses

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A look around a new lab at Pirbright Institute in Surrey, where the world’s most contagious livestock viruses will be kept.

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The metal detectors saving marriages

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The metal detectorists saving marriages

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Coming Out in Businessweek, Tim Cook Chooses to Play It Low Key

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Under a headline that did not directly address the issue, Mr. Cook chose to write a sober, conscientious essay for Bloomberg Businessweek that repeatedly used the word “privacy.”

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2014 Ozone Hole Update

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The Antarctic ozone hole reached its annual peak size on Sept. 11, according to scientists from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The size of this year’s hole was 24.1 million square kilometers (9.3 million square miles) — an area roughly the size of North America.

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Coming Out in Businessweek, Tim Cook Chooses to Play It Low Key

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Under a headline that did not directly address the issue, Mr. Cook chose to write a sober, conscientious essay for Bloomberg Businessweek that repeatedly used the word “privacy.”

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GoPro Sees Strong Holiday Quarter Sales; Shares Jump

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The video company reported a better-than-expected quarterly profit and revenue, driven by strong demand for its action cameras.

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Reddit launches crowdfunding platform Redditmade

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Reddit launched a crowdfunding tool Wednesday that gives users of the popular online forum a tailor-made alternative to Kickstarter and Indiegogo.

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Google execs discuss regulation, innovation and bobble-heads

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg help run Google, one of the world’s best-known, most successful – and most controversial – companies. They’ve just published a new book, "How Google Works," a guide to managing what they call "smart creatives," the technically proficient, innovation-savvy workers whom companies in every industry are trying to recruit and retain.

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Developing the battery of the future

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The search for the next generation of batteries has led researchers at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron to try new methods and materials that could lead to the development of safer, cheaper, more powerful, and longer-lasting power sources, to be used in almost everything, from vehicles to phones.

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Gamers’ funding fuels meteoric rise of ‘Star Citizen’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Chris Roberts’ brain spun out a grand vision: a rich, immersive galaxy; exquisite spaceships traversing between infinite star systems with thousands of computer gamers manning the cockpits, racing, dogfighting and defending humanity.

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FCC chief proposes opening the pay-TV industry to tech firms

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler wants to open the pay-TV industry to technology companies.

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Trailblazers: Tim Cook Is Important Because Firsts Are Important

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The Apple chief executive’s public announcement that he is gay could have a cascading effect on the culture at other companies.

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In U.S. Cleanup Efforts, Accident at Nuclear Site Points to Cost of Lapses

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

As the United States aims to correct years of mishandling radioactive materials, the price of reopening a New Mexico waste repository could top $551 million.

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Himalayan Viagra fuels caterpillar fungus gold rush

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Overwhelmed by speculators trying to cash-in on a prized medicinal fungus known as Himalayan Viagra, two isolated Tibetan communities have managed to do at the local level what world leaders often fail to do on a global scale—implement a successful system for the sustainable harvest of a precious natural resource, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

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Hubble sees ‘ghost light’ from dead galaxies

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

(Phys.org) —NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has picked up the faint, ghostly glow of stars ejected from ancient galaxies that were gravitationally ripped apart several billion years ago. The mayhem happened 4 billion light-years away, inside an immense collection of nearly 500 galaxies nicknamed "Pandora’s Cluster," also known as Abell 2744.

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Cassini sees sunny seas on Titan

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

(Phys.org) —As it soared past Saturn’s large moon Titan recently, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft caught a glimpse of bright sunlight reflecting off hydrocarbon seas.

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Smoke without fire: What’s the truth on e-cigarettes?

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

They’ve been called safe, dangerous, a way to quit smoking – and a way to start. New Scientist sifts through the evidence about e-cigarettes

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DealBook Street Scene: Praise for Cook Coming Out From Someone Who Did

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

David Geffen, the 71-year-old Hollywood mogul, was one of the first business executives to come out publicly as gay.

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They know the drill: UW leads the league in boring through ice sheets

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Wisconsin is famous for its ice fishers—the stalwarts who drill holes through lake ice in the hope of catching a winter dinner. Less well known are the state’s big-league ice drillers—specialists who design huge drills and use them to drill deep into ice in Greenland and Antarctica, places where even summer seems like winter.

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White noise for your nose cancels pungent aromas

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

By combining compounds in just the right mixture, researchers have worked out how to produce the olfactory equivalent of white noise

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Lord of the microrings: Team reports breakthrough in microring laser cavities

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A significant breakthrough in laser technology has been reported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley. Scientists led by Xiang Zhang, a physicist with joint appointments at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley, have developed a unique microring laser cavity that can produce single-mode lasing even from a conventional multi-mode laser cavity. This ability to provide single-mode lasing on demand holds ramifications for a wide range of applications including optical metrology and interferometry, optical data storage, high-resolution spectroscopy and optical communications.

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Spoiler-free guide to the science of Interstellar

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

With physics grand-master Kip Thorne doing the science, Interstellar promises to be the most fact-packed blockbuster of the year. Time to brush up

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High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine’s significant obstacles. The researchers will present their technique at the 168th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), held October 27-31, 2014, at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel.

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US market lifts global tablet sales: survey

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Strong sales in the United States helped boost the global market for tablet computers in the third quarter, tracker IDC said Thursday.

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AeroMobil 3.0 transforms from car to flying car

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A flying car is revealed: AeroMobil 3.0 was introduced this week at the Pioneers Festival in Vienna. The current prototype AeroMobil 3.0 incorporates improvements and upgrades to the previous AeroMobil 2.5.

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Spain OKs ‘Google Tax’ demanded by news publishers

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Spain’s parliament has approved new intellectual property laws that allow news publishers to charge aggregators each time they display news content in search results.

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Study finds restoring wetlands can lessen soil sinkage, greenhouse gas emissions

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Restoring wetlands can help reduce or reverse soil subsidence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to research in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta by Dartmouth College researchers and their colleagues.

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Active, biodegradable packaging for oily products

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The BIOMAT research group has developed a single-layer, biodegradable container from agro-industrial by-products suitable for both liquid and solid oily products.

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Study finds saving lonely species is important for the environment

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The lemur, Javan rhino and Santa Cruz kangaroo rat are all lonesome animals. As endemic species, they live in habitats restricted to a particular area due to climate change, urban development or other occurrences.

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Tim Cook’s Disclosure That He’s Gay Garners Sweeping Praise

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Apple’s chief executive was hailed by top executives, including Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Sundar Pichai of Google.

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Female frogs modify offspring development depending on reproduction date

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Global warming is altering the reproduction of plants and animals, notably accelerating the date when reproduction and other life processes occur. A study by the University of Uppsala (Sweden), including the participation of Spanish researcher Germán Orizaola, has discovered that some amphibians are capable of making their offspring grow at a faster rate if they have been born later due to the climate.

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Room for Debate: Hacking Sexism in Tech

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

What can be done to eliminate both subtle and blatant discrimination against women in the tech industry?

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Is space tourism safe or do civilians risk health effects?

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Several companies are developing spacecraft designed to take ordinary citizens, not astronauts, on short trips into space. "Space tourism" and short periods of weightlessness appear to be safe for most individuals according to a series of articles on space biomedicine published in New Space.

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NASA sees Cyclone Nilofar looking more like a comet than a tropical cyclone

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Tropical Cyclone Nilofar was closing in on the border between Pakistan and northwestern India on Oct. 30 when NASA’s Terra satellite passed overhead from space. Wind shear continued to affect the storm making it appear more like a comet with a tail, than a tropical cyclone.

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Pirate Bay founder faces jail term

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Warg could face a lengthy prison sentence after being found guilty of hacking into Danish computers.

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Room for Debate: Hacking Sexism in Tech

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

What can be done to eliminate both subtle and blatant discrimination against women in the tech industry?

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Apple chief: ‘I’m proud to be gay’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Apple chief executive Tim Cook has publicly acknowledged his sexuality, saying he wants to try to help people struggling with their identity.

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EU holds largest-ever cyber security exercise

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A European Union cyber-security agency was in Athens to conduct the largest exercise ever held on the continent to prevent attacks on Europe’s public utilities and communications networks.

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Four new dragon millipedes found in China

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A team of speleobiologists from the South China Agriculture University and the Russian Academy of Sciences have described four new species of the dragon millipedes from southern China, two of which seem to be cave dwellers. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

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Reef-builders with a sense of harmony

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. On dives with JAGO, a research submersible stationed at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, scientists from Scotland and Germany made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.

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Pterostilbene, a molecule similar to resveratrol, as a potential treatment for obesity

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

In collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture, researchers in the UPV/EHU’s ‘Nutrition and Obesity’ Group, which belongs to the Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition of the Carlos III Institute of Health, have observed in animal models that pterostilbene reduces the build-up of body fat, which could reduce the risk of developing other diseases like diabetes.

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Peripheral clocks don’t need the brain’s master clock to function correctly

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Circadian clocks regulate functions ranging from alertness and reaction time to body temperature and blood pressure. New research published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal further adds to our understanding of the circadian rhythm by suggesting that the suprachiasmaticus nucleus (SCN) clock, a tiny region of the hypothalamus considered to be the body’s "master" timekeeper, is not necessary to align body rhythms with the light-dark cycle. This challenges and disproves the commonly held notion that circadian rhythms were strictly organized in a hierarchical manner, and that light resets the master clock in the SCN, which then coordinates the other, subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues. Several metabolic and psychiatric diseases are associated with circadian rhythm and sleep disturbances, and this research opens the doors toward an improved understanding of these disorders.

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Researchers develop hybrid fluid transmission enabling light and swift robotic arms

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Engineers routinely face tradeoffs as they design robotic limbs – weight vs. speed, ease of control vs. fluidity. A new hybrid fluid transmission developed at Disney Research Pittsburgh promises to eliminate some of those tradeoffs, making possible robot arms that are light enough to move swiftly and gracefully, yet with precise control.

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Blocking a fork in the road to DNA replication

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

A team of Whitehead Institute scientists has discovered the surprising manner in which an enigmatic protein known as SUUR acts to control gene copy number during DNA replication. It’s a finding that could shed new light on the formation of fragile genomic regions associated with chromosomal abnormalities.

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What’s mighty about the mouse? For starters, its massive Y chromosome

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

An exhaustive effort to sequence the mouse Y chromosome reveals a surprisingly large and complex biological beast, at the same time providing remarkable insight into a heated battle for supremacy between mammalian sex chromosomes.

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Patents for humanity: Special edition of Technology and Innovation

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

The current special issue of Technology and Innovation, is devoted to patents that benefit people around the world who live with limited resources, in challenging environments, and are in need of better access to basic needs and improved standards of living, health and infrastructure.

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Identifying the source of stem cells

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

When most animals begin life, cells immediately begin accepting assignments to become a head, tail or a vital organ. However, mammals, including humans, are special. The cells of mammalian embryos get to make a different first choice – to become the protective placenta or to commit to forming the baby.

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Report: Dangerous lab fires show lack of training

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Science teachers need more safety training before running dazzling chemical experiments that can result in dangerous flash fires.

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Smartphone sales lifted by emerging markets

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Global smartphone sales grew at a healthy pace in the third quarter, boosted by low-cost handsets in emerging markets, industry research showed Thursday.

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Microsoft joins fitness bandwagon

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Microsoft unveiled its first fitness band Thursday, joining a crowded market of connected devices for tracking and analyzing personal health data.

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In U.S. Cleanup Efforts, Accident at Nuclear Site Points to Cost of Lapses

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

As the United States aims to correct years of mishandling radioactive materials, the price of reopening a New Mexico waste repository could top $551 million.

Read more here

Matter: From Ancient DNA, a Clearer Picture of Europeans Today

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

New studies of genomes thousands of years old have allowed scientists to see bits of history playing out over time, revealing that Europeans today have genes from three very different populations.

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Apple chief: ‘I’m proud to be gay’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Apple chief executive Tim Cook has publicly acknowledged his sexuality, saying he wants to try to help people struggling with their identity.

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An unmanned rocket exploded. So what?

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Sputnik was launched more than 50 years ago. Since then we have seen missions launched to Mercury, Mars and to all the planets within the solar system. We have sent a dozen men to the moon and many more to the International Space Station, along with a significant complement of female astronauts. Our communications, banking, television, security and transport sectors rely on satellites orbiting the Earth.

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Tim Cook, Apple’s Chief Executive, Says He Is ‘Proud to Be Gay’

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Mr. Cook becomes the most prominent executive of a public company to come out.

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Genes play a key part in the recipe for a happy country

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Why are the Danes naturally more cheerful than the Brits, and why are we in turn more upbeat than the French? Research presented as part of this year’s ESRC Festival of Social Sciences shows us that the recipe behind a happy nation includes a list of ingredients – including increased equality, a fair and just welfare state, and trustworthy institutions and politicians – but specific genetic factors can have a significant effect.

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Speed boost for 4G in some cities

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Two of the UK’s mobile operators are turning on technology that boosts mobile speeds in a few UK cities.

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Formula could shed light on global climate change

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

Wright State University researchers have discovered a formula that accurately predicts the rate at which soil develops from the surface to the underlying rock, a breakthrough that could answer questions about greenhouse gases and has potential applications in agriculture.

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Reading on screens is different – does it matter?

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

We’re beginning to understand how digital devices affect literacy – but don’t assume that paper is always better than screens

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NASA image: Sunrise from the International Space Station

Written By: admin - Oct• 31•14

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman posted this image of a sunrise, captured from the International Space Station, to social media on Oct. 29, 2014. Wiseman wrote, "Not every day is easy. Yesterday was a tough one. #sunrise"

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