Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

In the Sharing Economy, Workers Find Both Freedom and Uncertainty

Written By: admin - Aug• 17•14

Workers are their own bosses in the sharing economy, but that flexibility also brings much uncertainty — and few of the protections of full-time work.

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Bits Blog: LiketoKnowit Lets You Shop Looks on Instagram

Written By: admin - Aug• 17•14

LiketoKnowit plugs into Instagram and gives people a way to browse the items that they view in their Instagram feeds and may want to buy.

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Study identifies factors that contribute to food trucks’ fast spread

Written By: admin - Aug• 17•14

They’re not your father’s lowbrow roach coaches serving up greasy burgers and bad dogs. Today’s gourmet food trucks peddle sushi, hybrid Korean tacos and other dishes that combine different types of cuisine to create a highbrow dining experience for foodies in search of eclectic, local eats.

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SeaWorld to redesign its whale tank

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The US marine park SeaWorld is to build a new killer whale enclosure as criticism grows over how the park handles the animals.

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Sen. Ron Wyden calls for surveillance policy shift

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden is calling for a shift in surveillance policy.

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Mexico acid leak leaves orange river, toxic water

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Ramona Yesenia stood in her town square with two empty jugs, waiting for water to replace the municipal supply contaminated by a chemical spill that turned Mexico’s Sonora river orange.

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Chinese man accused of hacking for US defense data

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

A federal grand jury has charged a Chinese businessman with a computer hacking scheme to steal information on military projects, including fighter jets, to sell to Chinese companies.

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Peers, but not peer pressure, key to prescription drug misuse among young adults

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Current efforts to prevent prescription drug misuse among young adults need to consider peers—but not peer pressure—according to a Purdue University study.

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Middle-aged women missing passion (and sex) seek affairs, not divorce

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

When middle-aged women seek extra-marital affairs, they are looking for more romantic passion, which includes sex—and don’t want to divorce their husbands, suggests new research to be presented at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.

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The notion of love can lead to greater acceptance of couples’ rights

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

An Indiana University study found that how "in love" a romantic couple appears to be is interpreted differently based on the couple’s sexual orientation, affecting what formal and informal rights people think that couple deserves.

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Disconnect between parenting and certain jobs a source of stress, study finds

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Some working parents are carrying more psychological baggage than others—and the reason has nothing to do with demands on their time and energy.

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Ethnoburbs: Segregation in suburbia

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

White flight does not end when residents move from poor urban neighborhoods to the suburbs. An Indiana University study found that white flight from one suburban neighborhood to another occurs when white residents move away from "ethnoburbs," suburban neighborhoods that attract a growing number of middle-class minority residents.

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For men in pink-collar jobs, a tradeoff: Lower pay, more job security

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Is a man without a four-year college degree better off trying to land a well-paying but insecure job in traditionally male fields such as manufacturing or construction, or should he consider lower-paying but steadier employment in a female-dominated field?

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Parental incarceration can be worse for a child than divorce or death of a parent

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

With more than 2 million people behind bars, the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. This mass incarceration has serious implications for not only the inmates, but their children, finds a new University of California-Irvine study. The study found significant health problems, including behavioral issues, in children of incarcerated parents and also that, for some types of health outcomes, parental incarceration can be more detrimental to a child’s well-being than divorce or the death of a parent.

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New study takes the shine off magpie folklore

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Magpies are not attracted to shiny objects and don’t routinely steal small trinkets such as jewellery, according to a new study.

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Beetles’ whiteness understood

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Scientists say the secret behind the super-whiteness of some beetles lies in the complex molecular geometry of their thin scales, which are able to scatter light with supreme efficiency.

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AUDIO: Is ‘the thieving magpie’ just a myth?

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

New research suggests that the idea of "the thieving magpie" being attracted to shiny objects may be a myth.

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Middle-aged women missing passion (and sex) seek affairs, not divorce

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

When middle-aged women seek extra-marital affairs, they are looking for more romantic passion, which includes sex — and don’t want to divorce their husbands, suggests new research to be presented at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.

Read more here

For men in pink-collar jobs, a tradeoff: Lower pay, more job security

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Is a man without a four-year college degree better off trying to land a well-paying but insecure job in traditionally male fields such as manufacturing or construction, or should he consider lower-paying but steadier employment in a female-dominated field?

Read more here

Parental incarceration can be worse for a child than divorce or death of a parent

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

With more than 2 million people behind bars, the US has the highest incarceration rate in the world. This mass incarceration has serious implications for not only the inmates, but their children, finds a new University of California-Irvine study.

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Peers, but not peer pressure, key to prescription drug misuse among young adults

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Current efforts to prevent prescription drug misuse among young adults need to consider peers — but not peer pressure — according to a Purdue University study.

Read more here

Disconnect between parenting and certain jobs a source of stress, study finds

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Some working parents are carrying more psychological baggage than others — and the reason has nothing to do with demands on their time and energy. The cause is their occupation.

Read more here

Ethnoburbs: Segregation in suburbia

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

White flight does not end when residents move from poor urban neighborhoods to the suburbs. An Indiana U. study found that white flight from one suburban neighborhood to another occurs when white residents move away from ‘ethnoburbs,’ suburban neighborhoods that attract a growing number of middle-class minority residents. The study will be discussed on Saturday at the American Sociological Association annual meeting.

Read more here

The notion of love can lead to greater acceptance of couples’ rights

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

An Indiana University study found that how ‘in love’ a romantic couple appears to be is interpreted differently based on the couple’s sexual orientation, affecting what formal and informal rights people think that couple deserves. The study will be discussed on Aug. 16 during the American Sociological Association annual meeting.

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Hospitals in the U.S. Get Ready for Ebola

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Some doctors say outfits worn by caregivers need to be more protective than what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends.

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Agencies Issue Warnings Over Bogus Ebola Cures

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The World Health Organization and the Food and Drug Administration warn some makers of dietary supplements to stop claiming their products will heal Ebola victims.

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With Ebola Cases Still Few, Populous Nigeria Has Chance to Halt Its Outbreak

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Health officials are watching Lagos, the metropolis where all of Nigeria’s Ebola cases have been reported, with intense interest.

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Adrift for Years, Bronx Children’s Museum Finds a Place to Park Its Purple Bus

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The scheduled opening of the Kids’ Powerhouse Discovery Center in 2016 will create a permanent home for what has been a mobile collection of exhibits and activities since 2011.

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Taking Up Arms Where Birds Feast on Buffet of Salmon

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Salmon, once nearly extinct on part of the Columbia River, are slowly recovering, to the delight of birds. As a result, those charged with nursing the salmon back to robust health have a new plan to protect them: shoot the birds.

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Beautiful Morning Conjunction

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Set your alarm for dawn! Venus and Jupiter are converging for a spectacular conjunction in the early morning sky.

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State of the Art: Web Trolls Winning as Incivility Increases

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Emotionally abusive comments are becoming more common online, and the consequences could include scaring away from the web those subject to attacks.

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Maths helps find climate-proof crops

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Researchers are developing mathematical models to help identify genetic material that could improve food crops’ resilience to climate change.

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Paying for life’s basics by Bitcoin

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The newsagent bringing the virtual currency back to basics

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For Its New Shows, Amazon Adds Art to Its Data

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

After an underwhelming initial foray into making its own video programming, Amazon has poured even more money into the effort.

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Magpies ‘don’t steal shiny objects’

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Science dispels the popular myth that magpies like to steal shiny objects for their nests.

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Bits Blog: Amazon, Its Friends and Critics

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The dispute between Amazon and Hachette has caused the retailer to start talking but made the publisher shut up. Some of the best commentary is coming from authors in the middle.

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DealBook: Alibaba Suspicious of Accounting at Film Company

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The accounting issues at the film company, which was recently acquired by Alibaba, are raising questions about whether the Chinese e-commerce giant was overzealous with recent takeovers.

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Making better solar cells with polychiral carbon nanotubes

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

New device absorbs across a wider portion of the solar spectrum

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DealBook: Doubt Is Cast on Vetting of Deals by Alibaba

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

On Friday, the company announced that it had discovered suspicious accounting at one of its acquisitions, a Hong Kong film company.

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Food Retailer Discloses a Data Breach

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The company said that it had been able to prevent the breach from affecting all its locations.

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Global Update: New Vaccine Shows Promise Against Mosquito-Borne Virus

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

All participants in the first phase of the trial developed antibodies that lasted at least six months, suggesting the vaccine may provide long-term protection against the chikungunya virus.

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Study reveals California meteorite’s rough and tumble journey

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

(Phys.org) —A meteorite that fell onto the roof of a house in Novato, California, on Oct. 17, 2012, has revealed a detailed picture of its origin and tumultuous journey through space and Earth’s atmosphere. An international consortium of fifty researchers studied the fallen meteorite and published their findings in the August issue of the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science.

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US clears $2.3 bln Lenovo deal for IBM unit

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

IBM said Friday that US authorities had cleared a $2.3 billion deal allowing China-based Lenovo to take over its server unit after a national security review.

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Hitchhiking robot charms its way across Canada

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

He has dipped his boots in Lake Superior, crashed a wedding and attended an Aboriginal powwow. A talking, bucket-bodied robot has enthralled Canadians since it departed from Halifax last month on a hitchhiking journey to the Pacific coast.

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Utility of sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Today, many ecological and evolutionary studies depend on a wide range of molecular tools to infer phylogenetic relationships, uncover population structure within species, and track quantitative traits. Agricultural studies use these same tools to improve crop yield and increase resistance to pests and disease.

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Bits Blog: Crowdfunding and Venture Funding: More Alike Than You Think

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

While a potato salad project made crowdfunding look whimsical, recent studies indicate the wisdom of the crowd and the venture capital community is often not that different.

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Bits Blog: Samsung Acquires SmartThings, in Embrace of the Smart Home

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The young company makes accessories that connect home appliances to the Internet and will help Samsung compete with Google and Apple.

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Bits Blog: Apple to Add Data Storage in China and Prohibit Two Chemicals

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Apple said it had begun storing user data on servers in mainland China. It also barred two chemicals that some factory workers had used during assembly of iPhones and iPads.

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Bits Blog: Amazon, Its Friends and Critics

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The dispute between Amazon and Hachette has caused the retailer to start talking but made the publisher shut up. Some of the best commentary is coming from authors in the middle.

Read more here

State of the Art: Web Trolls Winning as Incivility Increases

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Emotionally abusive comments are becoming more common online, and the consequences could include scaring away from the web those subject to attacks.

Read more here

Attack Ebola on a nanoscale

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

(Phys.org) —The Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has claimed more than 900 lives since February and has infected thousands more. Countries such as Nigeria and Liberia have declared health emergencies, while the World Health Organization began a two-day meeting on Wednesday to discuss ways to battle the outbreak.

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Phone snooping via gyroscope to be detailed at Usenix

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Put aside fears of phone microphones and cameras doing eavesdropping mischief for a moment, because there is another sensor that has been flagged. Researchers from Stanford and defense research group at Rafael will present their findings on the smartphones’ gyroscopes to measure acoustic signals in the vicinity of the phone at the Usenix Security on Friday, August 22. Translation: Your smartphone could eavesdrop on conversations. They found that the gyroscopes were sensitive enough to allow them to pick up some sound waves, turning them into crude microphones, said a detailed report by Andy Greenberg this week about their work, in Wired. The team themselves said their work demonstrated "an unexpected threat resulting from the unmitigated access to the gyro: applications and active web content running on the phone can eavesdrop sound signals, including speech, in the vicinity of the phone."

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Azure cloud services have a rough week

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Microsoft’s Azure cloud computing platform suffered a series of outages and service disruptions in the past week that affected several products and impacted customers in various parts of the world. Maintaining solid performance and reliability of the Azure infrastructure- and platform-as-a-service cloud tools is key for Microsoft as it battles strong rivals in this market like Amazon and Google.

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50 Cent, Intel team up on heart-monitor headphones

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Rap star 50 Cent and US computing giant Intel are teaming up on a new line of headphones that double as heart rate monitors.

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Esports: Boot camps give gaming teams the vital edge

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Pro gaming is such big business that top teams approach competition like athletes do, even setting up training camps where gamers work out and bond

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Ebola Epidemic Most Likely Much Larger Than Reported, W.H.O. Says

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

More than 1,100 deaths have been reported in four African nations, but the World Health Organization said the actual number is almost certainly higher.

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VIDEO: Dolphins squeal with delight

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

A study of trained dolphins has suggested that the marine mammals use express pleasure with squeals of delight.

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NASA satellite spots a weakening Karina, now a tropical storm

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

NASA’s Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Karina before it weakened to a tropical storm early on August 15 and imagery showed the vertical wind shear was already taking its toll.

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NASA sees no punch left in Tropical Storm Julio

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Tropical Storm Julio doesn’t have any strong thunderstorms or strong convection left in it according to infrared satellite imagery from NASA.

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DealBook: Alibaba Discovers Suspicious Accounting at Film Unit

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The disclosure may raise concerns that the e-commerce giant is biting off more than it can chew in a recent spree of acquisitions.

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Bits Blog: Spring, an E-Commerce Start-Up, Aims at Mobile Shopping

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Spring has more than 100 major retailer partners participating, including brands like Nicole Miller, Michael Kors and Levi’s.

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Bigger government makes for more satisfied people, international study finds

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

People living in countries with governments that spend more on social services report being more contented, according to a Baylor University study.

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Researchers discover a way to cause surface coating properties to change in less than a second

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers with members from Russia, Lebanon and Germany has found a way to cause a polymer coating to respond to environmental factors in just seconds, instead of the minutes or hours it takes for current polymers. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes how they came up with their technique and how it works.

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Record high for university places

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

A record number of students have had their university places confirmed, figures from admissions body Ucas show.

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SeaWorld plans new killer whale environments

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

SeaWorld says will build new, larger environments for killer whales at its theme parks, and will fund additional research on the animals along with programs to protect ocean health and whales in the wild.

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German researchers develop defense software: Potential protection against the "Hacienda" intelligence program

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Today, a group of journalists has reported the existence of the "Hacienda" spy program. According to this report, five western intelligence agencies are using the Hacienda software to identify vulnerable servers across the world in order to control them and use them for their own purposes. Scientists at the Technische Universität München (TUM) have developed free software that can help prevent this kind of identification and thus the subsequent capture of systems.

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Bats bolster brain hypothesis, maybe technology, too

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Amid a neuroscience debate about how people and animals focus on distinct objects within cluttered scenes, some of the newest and best evidence comes from the way bats "see" with their ears, according to a new paper in the Journal of Experimental Biology. In fact, the perception process in question could improve sonar and radar technology.

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Laser makes microscopes way cooler

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

(Phys.org) —Laser physicists have found a way to make atomic-force microscope probes 20 times more sensitive and capable of detecting forces as small as the weight of an individual virus.

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Study shows knowledge can travel from children to adults

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

A new study by Bangor scientists shows that environmental education can positively influence the knowledge and attitudes of children. The paper, published in the journal Animal Conservation, also shows that knowledge gained by children about lemur conservation can be transferred to their parents

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A study of possible extended symmetries of field theoretic systems

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Many physical systems, from superfluids to pi mesons, are understood to be manifestations of spontaneous symmetry breaking, whereby the symmetries of a system are not realized by its lowest energy state. A consequence of spontaneous symmetry breaking is the existence of excitations known as Goldstone bosons, which account for the broken symmetries. Here the authors investigate systems with larger than usual amounts of broken symmetry.

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Thin films of oxide materials reveal topological electronic properties hidden in the three-dimensional form

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Naoto Nagaosa and Bohm-Jung Yang from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science have predicted that thin films of certain iridate compounds could harbor unusual ‘topological’ electronic properties that are hidden in regular three-dimensional crystals. "Topological phenomena in artificial thin films are much richer than those found in natural crystals. Even more important, however, is the fact that it is possible to manipulate those topological properties by tuning various parameters such as film thickness," comments Nagaosa.

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How yeast formations got started

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Researchers conducted a comparative analysis of nearly 60 fungal genomes to determine the genetic traits that enabled the convergent evolution of yeasts.

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Equine expert warns traveling livestock owners of vesicular stomatitis

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

(Medical Xpress)—A Kansas State University veterinarian is cautioning residents of Kansas and surrounding states about a highly contagious viral disease that affects horses and livestock—and can sometimes affect humans.

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Energy equation points to cell autonomy

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The mechanical and metabolic energies of cells have been explored through the use of order-of-magnitude estimates, highlighting the energy required for cell shape changes.

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DealBook: Alibaba Discovers Suspicious Accounting at Film Unit

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The disclosure may raise concerns that the e-commerce giant is biting off more than it can chew in a recent spree of acquisitions.

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Higgs boson could also explain the earliest expansion of the Universe

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Fedor Bezrukov from the RIKEN–BNL Research Center and Mikhail Shaposhnikov from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne propose that the Higgs boson, which was recently confirmed to be the origin of mass, may also be responsible for the mode of inflation and shape of the Universe shortly after the Big Bang. "There is an intriguing connection between the world explored in particle accelerators today and the earliest moments of the existence of the Universe," explains Bezrukov.

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Insights into the mechanistic details of protein synthesis could inform efforts to manipulate the genetic code

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The recipe for any given protein is written out as a series of ‘codons’, each of which encodes a particular amino acid. These amino acids are delivered via transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, which feature an ‘anticodon’ element that recognizes a particular codon. For this system to function properly, every tRNA must be linked to the correct amino acid—a process that is mediated by a family of enzymes called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. A research team led by Shigeyuki Yokoyama from the RIKEN Structural Biology Laboratory and Paul Schimmel of The Scripps Research Institute in the United States has now learned how one such enzyme achieves such selective coupling.

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DealBook: For Merchants, Bitcoin Shows More Pop Than Potential

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Merchants that accept Bitcoin are trying to attract virtual currency enthusiasts. And the number of merchants has been growing.

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Butterflies switch lifestyles using hormones

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Many habitats on Earth change dramatically with the seasons, profoundly affecting food availability, predation pressure and reproductive opportunities for animals living in these seasonal habitats. To survive and reproduce successfully, animals must deal with such seasonal variation in ecological threats and opportunities.

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Mosaic image reveals Martian glory

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Scientists in Germany have pieced together a stunning mosaic image of the Martian surface.

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World’s first ‘smartphone’ turns 20

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

A new exhibition at London’s Science Museum celebrates 20 years since the first ‘smartphone’, the IBM Simon, went on sale.

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Bits Blog: Crowdfunding and Venture Funding: More Alike Than You Think

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

While a potato salad project made crowdfunding look whimsical, recent studies indicate the wisdom of the crowd and the venture capital community is often not that different.

Read more here

State of the Art: Web Trolls Winning as Incivility Increases

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Emotionally abusive comments are becoming more common online, and the consequences could include scaring away from the web those subject to attacks.

Read more here

Outside Google’s New York Office, a Giant Rat Is All but Invisible

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

A large rat has appeared around the Chelsea building for several months. But the creature, a common sight at union protests, is not against the search engine.

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Gamer disclaimer: Virtual worlds can be as fulfilling as real life

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Step aside Olympians – the new sporting pursuit of choice may soon be professional gaming. Electronic sports (or esports) are now mainstream, drawing more than a million viewers in large tournaments and offering prizes up to US$5 million.

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Fossilized marine plankton tell the tale of the end Permian mass extinction

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The worst mass extinction the Earth has ever seen occurred 252 million years ago. The boundary of the Permian and Triassic geological periods marked the demise of around 90 percent of marine species and 70 percent of land species.

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Drones are fun toys until you get hit in the face by one

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Mini drones are not yet appearing in our skies on a daily basis but they certainly are a rapidly growing trend. People can and do get hurt so we really need to help amateur pilots learn how to fly their new toys safely.

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World’s oldest true dolphin species discovered

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Waseda researchers have described the earliest example of a true dolphin in the known fossil record.

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Kateeva coating could finally give us bendable displays

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

A new startup based in Menlo Park, California called Kateeva might have solved one of the problems that is keeping manufacturers from selling us portable devices with bendable displays. They’ve developed a coating process for organic liquid crystal displays (OLEDs) that they claim is in a price range that would make manufacturing bendable displays possible.

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Politicians need to address transport taboos, not just new technology, to meet carbon targets

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Transport accounts for 30% of CO2 emissions in the EU, with emissions rising 36% between 1990 and 2007. The research, carried out by Lund University and the University of Surrey a found a need to dissect the widely-held view that new technologies, such as biofuel and improved aircraft design, will result in carbon reduction targets being met.

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Lemongrass fiber as lost circulation material in drilling fluid

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Universiti Teknologi MARA researchers are investigating the properties of lemongrass fibers to help prevent fluid circulation problems while drilling for oil and gas.

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As traditional media falters, hyperlocal news is on the up

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

As an example of mass participatory journalism, where the voices of ordinary citizens are heard as much as public officials or PR professionals, the UK’s hyperlocal news network is second to none.

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Sound and light unleashed in LightFreq with built-in audio

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

An enterprising team with experience in music, engineering, coding, product and graphic design, have come up with a prototype called LightFreq, This is a Bluetooth light bulb with built-in HD audio. A light bulb and speaker combo? Why would anyone want to own that kind of device? The team has an engaging set of answers: "Why do we only use our lights to see? That would be like only using our phones to make calls, right?" "We solved the problem of the dumb light bulb." The distinguishing edge to their concept is that the device comes with an accompanying app, for iOS or Android smart devices, which unlocks numerous features. With the app, the user can turn LightFreq into a useful device for notifications according to the color of the light or for mood-centric applications such as strobe lights. Also, LightFreq will turn on and off automatically when you enter or leave a room. As for "follow-me" audio capabilities, the LightFreq starts playing music in the room you are in and when you move into a different room your music will follow, while turning off in the room you just left.

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Potential data breach revealed by Supervalu (Update)

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The grocery chain Supervalu said Friday that it may have suffered a data breach at stores in as many as five states.

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Space station supply ship exits, now packing trash

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

A commercial cargo ship has ended its month-long space station visit.

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Public dollars, private rules: The charter school calculus

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The phenomenal growth of charter schools nationwide has been aided by a canny legal strategy in which the schools claim to be public for the purpose of taking in tax dollars but private for the purpose of evading government oversight, according to Preston Green, John and Carla Klein Professor of Urban Education at UConn’s Neag School of Education.

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Four chameleon species discovered in Mozambique’s ‘sky islands’

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Expeditions to northern Mozambique’s remote mountains have uncovered a wealth of new species, including four pygmy chameleons.

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Scientist exposes new world of forensic analysis

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Over the past 20 years DNA evidence has become the foundation upon which forensic investigation is built. The identification of traces of blood, saliva and other bodily fluids places a suspect directly at the site of a crime, and can be the difference between a guilty or not guilty verdict in court.

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Earth’s early life endured long asteroid bombardment

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

Massive asteroids may have pounded Earth for a billion years longer than we thought – with early life forms suffering periodic melting of the surface

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More to a skilled ear in music

Written By: admin - Aug• 16•14

The first pilot study in Australia to give musicians the skills and training to critically assess music by what they hear rather than what they see begins this month at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.The study aims to address a lack of skill and formal training in the industry that enables music judges to critically assess sound – an important skill when it comes to auditions and judging music in the ‘real world’.

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