Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Step lightly: All-optical transistor triggered by single photon promises advances in quantum applications

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

(Phys.org) —Optical transistors and switches are fundamental in both classical and quantum optical information processing. A key objective in optics research is determining and developing the structural and performance limits of such all-optical devices, in which a single gate photon modifies the transmission or phase accumulation of multiple source photons – a feature necessitating strong interaction between individual photons. While significant progress has been made – especially in cavity QED experiments, which use resonators to enhance interaction between photons, confined in a reflective enclosure, and natural or artificial atoms – the goal is to achieve high optical gain and high efficiency using a free-space – that is, cavity-free – approach. Recently, scientists at Universität Stuttgart, Germany demonstrated a free-space single-photon transistor based on two-color Rydberg interaction, which they say could lead to a high optical gain, high efficiency optical transistor through further improvements. (In a Rydberg atom a single electron is excited to a state with a large principle quantum number, meaning that it has high potential energy.) Moreover, the researchers state that the finding may lead to advances in quantum information processing, condensed matter physics, single step multi-photon entanglement, and other important areas.

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After Xen and KVM, meet a new Linux hypervisor: Jailhouse

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

In the world of hypervisors for Linux, a couple of names have come to the fore over time: Xen and KVM.

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Q&A: Don’t Judge Them by Their Shells

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

They look different, but the difference in nutritional value between the different-colored eggs is negligible.

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Soviet dog spacesuit for pooches with the right stuff

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Your canine companion can strut its stuff in this authentic Soviet spacesuit, worn by genuine doggy heroes of the space race Belka and Strelka

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China’s reform of R&D budget management doesn’t go far enough, research shows

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

In almost 20 years, China’s R&D expenditure as a percentage of its gross domestic product has more than tripled, reaching 1.98 per cent in 2012. This figure surpasses the 28 member states of the EU, which collectively managed 1.96 per cent.

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Scientists solve ‘sliding rocks’ puzzle

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Scientists have finally worked out how rocks on a dry lake bed in California move across the ground.

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Bits Blog: Looking to the Future of Data Science

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The future of data science lies beyond the big-data focus on predictions and recommendations, according to Oren Etzioni, a leading computer scientist.

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DealBook: To Compete Against Alibaba, Wanda Joins Forces With Baidu and Tencent

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Dalian Wanda, the Chinese conglomerate controlled by the billionaire Wang Jianlin, announced it would enter the e-commerce industry in an $800 million partnership with two of China’s biggest Internet companies.

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Danish museum discovers unique gift from Charles Darwin

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The Natural History Museum of Denmark recently discovered a unique gift from one of the greatest-ever scientists. In 1854, Charles Darwin – father of the theory of evolution – sent a gift to his Danish colleague Japetus Steenstrup, director of the Royal Museum of Natural History. Until very recently, no one at the museum knew that it possessed a piece of scientific history of this calibre. Just a few weeks ago, the head of exhibitions was studying the correspondence between Steenstrup and Darwin as part of her search for objects to include in an upcoming exhibition. She started to suspect a treasure lay hidden somewhere, and soon a hunt was launched among the museum’s 14 million objects.

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Managing coasts under threat from climate change and sea-level rise

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Coastal regions under threat from climate change and sea-level rise need to tackle the more immediate threats of human-led and other non-climatic changes, according to a team of international scientists.

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Emailing angry? Your keyboard feels your pain

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

By measuring the way you are typing, a computer program can detect how you are feeling with 80 per cent accuracy

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Watching others play video games is the new spectator sport

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

As the UK’s largest gaming festival, Insomnia, wrapped up its latest event on August 25, I watched a short piece of BBC Breakfast news reporting from the festival. The reporter and some of the interviewees appeared baffled at the huge popularity of "videogame livestreaming", otherwise known as gamers watching other gamers playing games.

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CryptoWall held over half a million computers hostage, encrypted 5 billion files

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A file-encrypting ransomware program called CryptoWall infected over 600,000 computer systems in the past six months and held 5 billion files hostage, garnering more than $1 million for its creators , researchers found. The Counter Threat Unit (CTU) at Dell SecureWorks performed an extensive analysis of CryptoWall that involved gathering data from its command-and-control (C&C) servers, tracking its variants and distribution methods and counting payments made by victims so far.

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DOE ‘Knowledgebase’ links biologists, computer scientists to solve energy, environmental issues

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

If biologists wanted to determine the likely way a particular gene variant might increase a plant’s yield for producing biofuels, they used to have to track down several databases and cross-reference them using complex computer code. The process would take months, especially if they weren’t familiar with the computer programming necessary to analyze the data.

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Mirror-image forms of corannulene molecules could lead to exciting new possibilities in nanotechnology

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Corannulene is a bowl-shaped polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon with a skeleton of bonded carbon atoms equivalent to a segment of the buckminsterfullerene or ‘buckyball’—a soccer-ball-like structure of 60 carbon atoms. This similarity to the buckyball has led to corannulene being dubbed the ‘buckybowl’. Chemists are interested in the chemical potential of corannulenes as catalysts and in nanotechnology applications, but exploring the potential of these molecules is complicated because they invert rapidly between their mirror-image or ‘chiral’ forms (Fig. 1).

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DealBook: To Compete Against Alibaba, Dalian Joins Forces With Baidu and Tencent

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Dalian Wanda, the Chinese conglomerate controlled by the billionaire Wang Jianlin, announced it would enter the e-commerce industry in an $800 million partnership with two of China’s biggest Internet companies.

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‘K-to-M’ histone mutations: How repressing the repressors may drive tissue-specific cancers

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

In a cell’s nucleus, chromosomal DNA is tightly bound to structural proteins known as histones, an amalgam biologists call chromatin. Until about two decades ago, histones were regarded as a nuclear "sidekick," the mere packing material around which the glamorous DNA strands were wrapped. Recently, however, biologists have developed a greater appreciation for how DNA/histone interactions govern gene expression.

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Beautiful spiral cracks could be a feature, not a flaw

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Unusually uniform, watercolour-like fractures that form in high-tech materials could be used to manufacture micro-patterned surfaces

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Chief Executive of Rovio, Maker of Angry Birds Game, to Step Down

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The move by Mikael Hed comes as the Finnish company struggles to respond to an increasing trend toward so-called freemium games.

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The unifying framework of symmetry reveals properties of a broad range of physical systems

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Symmetry is one of the most fundamental concepts in nature, and it can give rise to profound and wide-reaching physical effects. A one-dimensional wire, for example, has a different symmetry and very different mechanical properties to those of a two-dimensional sheet of the same material. Tomoya Hayata and Yoshimasa Hidaka from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science have now studied the consequences of breaking symmetry for various systems found in nature, providing a powerful, general framework to describe the link between properties and symmetries.

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Tricorder XPRIZE: 10 teams advance in global competition to develop consumer-focused diagnostic device

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

XPRIZE today announced the 10 finalist teams competing for the $10M Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE, a 3.5-year global competition sponsored by the Qualcomm Foundation for teams to develop a consumer-focused, mobile device capable of diagnosing and interpreting a set of 15 medical conditions and capturing five vital health metrics. Launched in January 2012, the competition encourages the development of a device much like the medical Tricorder of Star Trek fame, moving it from science fiction to science reality.

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Wetlands not ‘wetting’ enough for invertebrates

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Perth’s southern wetlands are steadily drying and prolonged dry spells in the future will threaten the survival of their invertebrate fauna populations, research suggests.

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Plug n’ Play protein crystals

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Almost a hundred years ago in 1929 Linus Pauling presented the famous Pauling’s Rules to describe the principles governing the structure of complex ionic crystals. These rules essentially describe how the arrangement of atoms in a crystal is critically dependent on the size of the atoms, their charge and type of bonding. According to scientists from the Biohybrid Materials Group of Aalto University Finland led by Mauri Kostiainen similar rules can be applied to prepare ionic colloidal crystals consisting of oppositely charged proteins and virus particles. The results can be applied for example in packing and protecting virus particles into crystals that mimic nature’s own occlusion bodies (protein lattices that pack and protect virus particles to maintain their long-term infectivity), preparation of biocompatible metamaterials, biomolecule crystallization and the subsequent structural analysis.

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Should Microsoft kill Windows Phone?

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

It’s been nearly four years since Microsoft first released Windows Phone, and what it has gotten after many millions of dollars in development and marketing costs, plus its $7.2 billion acquisition of Nokia, is this: a worldwide smartphone market share of less than 3 percent. And that number has been going down, not up.

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Nintendo launching ‘amiibo’ with 12 characters

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Pikachu and Link will be among the first characters coming to "amiibo."

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Bacterial communication considered for medical applications

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A local microbiologist has been working on an alternative to antibiotics, which tend to encourage resistant bacterial strains to develop over time.

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A guide to the 2014 Neptune opposition season

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Never seen Neptune? Now is a good time to try, as the outermost ice giant world reaches opposition this weekend at 14:00 Universal Time (UT) or 10:00 AM EDT on Friday, August 29th. This means that the distant world lies "opposite" to the Sun as seen from our Earthly perspective and rises to the east as the Sun sets to the west, riding high in the sky across the local meridian near midnight.

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Researchers identify a pheromone in the urine of male tilapia fish that stimulates spawning in females

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The exchange of chemical signals between organisms is considered the oldest form of communication. Acting as messenger molecules, pheromones regulate social interactions between conspecifics, for example, the sexual attraction between males and females. Fish rely on pheromones to trigger social responses and to coordinate reproductive behavior in males and females. Scientists at the Marine Science Center at the University of the Algarve in Faro, Portugal, and at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now identified such a signal molecule in the urine of male Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus): this pheromone boosts hormone production and accelerates oocyte maturation in reproductive females. Hence, the Mozambique tilapia is one of the first fish species in which the chemical structure of a pheromone has been identified and the biological basis of its activity elucidated.

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What time is it in the universe?

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Flavor Flav knows what time it is. At least he does for Flavor Flav. Even with all his moving and accelerating, with the planet, the solar system, getting on planes, taking elevators, and perhaps even some light jogging. In the immortal words of Kool Moe Dee. Do you know what time it is?

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Researchers suggest lack of published null result papers skews reliability of those that are published

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

(Phys.org) —A trio of researchers at Stanford University has shined a light on a problem many in the social science research arena are aware of but tend to ignore: the problem of null result papers not being written or published. In their paper published in the journal Science, Annie Franco, Neil Malhotra and Gabor Simonovits suggest that not publishing null result papers produces a bias in the literature, skewing the reliability of papers with strong results that are published. Jeffery Mervis offers an In Depth piece on the team’s work in the same journal edition.

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Thermonuclear X-ray bursts on neutron stars set speed record

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A new study of thermonuclear X-ray bursts on neutron stars reveals that, on very rare occasions, shells can be expelled at relativistic speeds – up to 30% of the speed of light. These velocities are the highest ever measured for a cosmic thermonuclear event, including novae and thermonuclear supernovae. This phenomenon, discovered in only 0.1 second worth of data in 40 years of space-based X-ray astronomy, sheds new light on how nuclear flames spread over surfaces of neutron stars. The research results have been published in Astronomy & Astrophysics.

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How can we find tiny particles in exoplanet atmospheres?

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

It may seem like magic, but astronomers have worked out a scheme that will allow them to detect and measure particles ten times smaller than the width of a human hair, even at many light-years distance.  They can do this by observing a blue tint in the light from far-off objects caused by the way in which small particles, no more than a micron in size (one-thousandth of a millimeter) scatter light.

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Hydrogen powers important nitrogen-transforming bacteria

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are key players in the natural nitrogen cycle on Earth and in biological wastewater treatment plants. For decades, these specialist bacteria were thought to depend on nitrite as their source of energy. An international team of scientists led by Holger Daims, a microbiologist at the University of Vienna, has now shown that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria can use hydrogen as an alternative source of energy. The oxidation of hydrogen with oxygen enables their growth independent of nitrite and a lifestyle outside the nitrogen cycle. The study is published in the current issue of the journal Science.

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Experiments reveal a neutron halo around neutron-rich magnesium nuclei

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Most stable atomic nuclei are made up of roughly an equal number of protons and neutrons. With the right equipment, however, physicists can create nuclei with many additional neutrons. These neutron-rich nuclei are short-lived but represent an important tool for developing a better understanding of how the elements in the Universe were created.

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EU project sails off to study Arctic sea ice

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A one-of-a-kind scientific expedition is currently heading to the Arctic, aboard the South Korean icebreaker Araon. This joint initiative of the US and Korea will measure atmospheric, sea ice and ocean properties with technology developed under the EU-funded ICE-ARC project.

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Leap Motion offers VR mount for hand recognition device, reveals plans for better VR experience

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Leap Motion, maker of a device that sits on a desk to capture hand movements (to replace the mouse, joystick, etc.) has announced that it is now offering a mounting apparatus that allows for connecting its recognition device directly to head-worn virtual reality gear such as the Oculus Rift. The mounting hardware also comes with an updated SDK kit to allow for the new perspective offered by the recognition device.

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Avatars make the Internet sign to deaf people

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

It is challenging for deaf people to learn a sound-based language, since they are physically not able to hear those sounds. Hence, most of them struggle with written language as well as with text reading and comprehension. Therefore, most website content remains inaccessible for them. Computer scientists from Saarbrücken, Germany, want to change the situation by means of a method they developed: animated online characters display content in sign language. In the long term, deaf people would be able to use the technique to communicate on online platforms via sign language. To realize the technique, users would only need readily available devices.

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Iceland lowers volcano ash alert

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The Icelandic Met Office lowers its aviation warning from red to orange near the Bardarbunga volcano, which saw an eruption begin overnight.

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DealBook: To Compete with Alibaba, Dalian Joins Forces With Baidu and Tencent

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Dalian Wanda, controlled by the billionaire Wang Jianlin, announced it would enter the e-commerce industry in an $800 million partnership with two of China’s biggest Internet companies.

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Single-cell genomics sheds light on nutrient and carbon cycling in Actinobacteria

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Researchers assembled and compared draft genomes of acI Actinobacteria from single cells collected in four freshwater lakes in the United States and Europe.

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Study reveals drivers of Western consumers’ readiness to eat insects

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The most likely early adopters of insets as a meat substitute in Western societies are young men with weak attitudes toward meat, who are open to trying novel foods and interested in the environmental impact of their food choice. With a low level of food neophobia, the likelihood that this type of person is willing to eat insects as a meat substitute is estimated more than 75%, according to a new study published in Food Quality and Preference.

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Early computer oscillator could become a core part of quantum computers

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

At the dawn of the era of solid-state electronics, a variety of promising technologies were competing to supplant the then-ubiquitous vacuum tube. The transistor quickly proved to be the fastest and most practical of these technologies. Yet as demonstrated by Zhirong Lin and Tsuyoshi Yamamoto from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science and their colleagues, one of the abandoned solid-state technologies, the parametric phase-locked oscillator (PPLO), could enjoy a revival as a core component of quantum computers.

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Iceland lowers volcano ash alert

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The Icelandic Met Office lowers its aviation warning from red to orange near the Bardarbunga volcano, which saw an eruption begin overnight.

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Scientists conclude sun-powered boat trip to find Europe’s oldest village

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Ever since humans built their first boat, offshore exploration has been one of the most fruitful ways to find out more about the world we live in. And this hasn’t stopped with the so-called Age of Exploration. Nowadays, scientists are travelling all across the world to study ecosystems, monitor climate change, discover new species or make groundbreaking archeological discoveries. However it has been claimed that such research can participate to damaging the environment.

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Researchers search for evidence of earliest inhabitants of Central Great Plains

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A team led by University of Kansas Distinguished Professor Rolfe Mandel in July excavated a northeast Kansas site in Pottawatomie County seeking to find artifacts tied to the Clovis and Pre-Clovis peoples, the founding populations of the Americas.

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Honeybees play a vital role in the agricultural industry

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The next time you tuck into a salad, thank a honeybee.

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Climate change ‘secrets’ recovered from bottom of Greenland lake

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Scientists from the University of Aberdeen have delved to the bottom of an arctic lake in order to chart the effects of climate change over the past 10,000 years in an effort to better understand global warming.

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Bits Blog: Google Joins Amazon in Dreams of Drone Delivery

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Who needs UPS trucks and bicycle delivery when you can fly in things people buy online?

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Precarious work schedules common among younger workers

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

One wish many workers may have this Labor Day is for more control and predictability of their work schedules. A new report finds that unpredictability is widespread in many workers’ schedules—one reason why organized labor groups and policymakers are now focusing on work schedule reform.

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Top ten reptiles and amphibians benefitting from zoos

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A frog that does not croak, the largest living lizard, and a tortoise that can live up to 100 years are just some of the species staving off extinction thanks to the help of zoos, according to a new report.

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Planet–satellite nanostructures from gold nanoparticles and RAFT star polymers

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

(Phys.org) —The cosmos in miniature: German researchers have produced nanoparticles surrounded by a group of smaller nanoparticles like a planet orbited by satellites. They equipped larger gold nanoparticles with special star-shaped polymers, which in turn bind to smaller gold nanoparticles. As the researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it is possible to precisely control the distance between the tiny "satellites" and their central "planet" by means of the molecular weight—and thus the chain length—of the polymers.

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Study shows local seismic isolation and damping methods provide optimal protection for essential computing equipment

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

In experiments aimed at securing essential electronic equipment, a team of researchers led by earthquake engineer Claudia Marin-Artieda is seeking solutions for protecting computer servers, backup power units, and other high-tech equipment by employing locally installed passive seismic protective systems, such as base isolation and damping.

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Low-key GCHQ protest under way

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A low-key protest by online activists has started outside the UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ).

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Changes in farming and climate hurting British moths

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Britain’s moths are feeling the pinch – threatened on one side by climate change and on the other by habitat loss and harmful farming methods. A new study gives the most comprehensive picture yet of trends in moth populations, showing that these pressures put them in a similar position to other, better-studied UK animal groups.

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Devil’s Tongue flower comes to life in continuing five-year cycle

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

A rare plant at the McMaster Biology Greenhouse is finally showing its true colours (and odours), and may not bloom for another five years.

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Atmospheric mercury review raises concerns of environmental impact

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

The professor and chair of the UALR Department of Chemistry has recently completed an in-depth review of atmospheric mercury in Energy and Emissions Control Technologies, an open access peer-review journal published by Dove Press.

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Collective bargaining subsidizes low-wage work in some states

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

States with right-to-work laws "free ride" on the higher tax revenues generated by workers in collective bargaining states, says a new study from a University of Illinois labor expert.

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DealBook: To Compete with Alibaba, a Chinese E-Commerce Company Is Born

Written By: admin - Aug• 30•14

Dalian Wanda, controlled by the billionaire Wang Jianlin, announced it would enter the e-commerce industry in an $800 million partnership with Baidu and Tencent.

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How does your wine make you feel?

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

University of Adelaide researchers are investigating the links between wine, where it’s consumed and emotion to help the Australian wine industry gain deeper consumer insights into their products.

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Snails tell of the rise and fall of the Tibetan plateau

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

The rise of the Tibetan plateau—the largest topographic anomaly above sea level on Earth—is important for both its profound effect on climate and its reflection of continental dynamics. In this study published in GSA Bulletin, Katharine Huntington and colleagues employ a cutting-edge geochemical tool—"clumped" isotope thermometry—using modern and fossil snail shells to investigate the uplift history of the Zhada basin in southwestern Tibet.

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Hillary Clinton: ‘Our technology companies are not part of our government’

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called for a "global compact" on surveillance and the use of collected data, saying the U.S. isn’t the only country that does it and American technology companies are unfairly targeted for the government’s actions. "The U.S. government doesn’t use information for commercial purposes," while other countries do, Clinton said.

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Breaking down differences in modeling soil water substantially shifts carbon stored in land

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

The starting point very often changes the finish. A team led by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory modeled runoff, that is, water’s movement over the land surface and through the subsurface, using two widely adopted methods. They found that the modeling choices result in differences that ultimately swing results in carbon cycle simulations—by as much as 20 percent. The differences in modeling runoff methods cause substantial differences in the soil moisture that also changes soil temperature. Their study was published in the Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems.

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Intracellular imaging gets interactive

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

A so-called bioparallel chemistry approach is successfully used to image and activate an essential metabolism compound inside a cell.

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GCHQ protest ‘delayed by day’

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

The first of three days of protest by online activists outside the UK Government Communications Headquarters is delayed, the BBC understands.

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Research shows over half of shared-path users frustrated by the actions of others

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Over half of Bristol and Bath Railway Path users reported being frustrated by the actions of other pedestrians and cyclists on the day they were surveyed, according to the findings of research presented at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) international conference in London.

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Has the humble password had its day?

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

What new techs can reliably establish our identities?

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Xerox printer ‘comes to your desk’

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Fuji Xerox develops robotic printer that can move around a lounge or office to bring documents to the person who printed them.

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Girls got game

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Debi Taylor has worked in everything from construction development to IT, and is well and truly socialised into male-dominated workplaces. So when she found herself the only female in her game development classes as a mature age student in her honours year of IT, she was more curious than intimidated.

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Legal challenge to badger cull fails

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

A High Court bid to halt this year’s badger culling, which will take place without independent monitoring, fails.

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Simpler process to grow germanium nanowires could improve lithium ion batteries

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

(Phys.org) —Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed what they call "a simple, one-step method" to grow nanowires of germanium from an aqueous solution. Their process could make it more feasible to use germanium in lithium ion batteries.

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Engineering ultrasensitive probes of nanoscale physical and chemical processes

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Sometimes, it seems as if molecules struggle to communicate with scientists. When it comes to junction plasmons, essentially light waves trapped at tiny gaps between noble metals, what the molecules have to say could radically change the design of detectors used for science and security. Single molecule detection sensitivity is feasible through Raman scattering from molecules coaxed into plasmonic junctions. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) found that sequences of Raman spectra recorded at a plasmonic junction, formed by a gold tip and a silver surface, exhibit dramatic intensity fluctuations, accompanied by switching from familiar vibrational line spectra of a molecule to broad band spectra of the same origin. The fluctuations confirm the team’s earlier model that assigns enhanced band spectra in Raman scattering from plasmonic nanojunctions to shorting of the junction plasmon through intervening molecular bridges.

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‘SwaziLeaks’ looks to shake up jet-setting monarchy

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

As WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange prepares to end a two-year forced stay at Ecuador’s London embassy, he may take comfort in knowing he inspired resistance to secrecy in places as far away as Swaziland.

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Ecuador heralds ‘digital currency’ plans

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Ecuador is planning to create the world’s first government-issued digital currency, which some analysts believe could be a first step toward abandoning the country’s existing currency, the U.S. dollar, which the government cannot control.

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Samsung denies child labour at Chinese supplier

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

South Korea’s Samsung Electronics has refuted fresh allegations by a labour protection watchdog that one of its suppliers in China hired child workers.

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Mozilla tackles the browser memory conundrum

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Mozilla’s Servo browser engine project looks to improve

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Microsoft Azure makes nice with Google to get a piece of Docker

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Credit: iStockphoto

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Comcast, Marxism, and Net neutrality: Twisted words, shameless hypocrisy

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

In the final weeks for filing comments to the FCC on Net neutrality, the gloves have come off and the world’

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Japan gov’t calls on citizens to stockpile toilet paper

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

The Japanese government is calling on its citizens to prepare for the worst-case scenario, should a major disaster hit the quake-prone archipelago: Stockpile toilet paper.

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Twitter to set up shop in social-media-mad Indonesia

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Twitter plans to open an office in Indonesia over the coming months as it seeks to boost revenues in the social-media-addicted nation, the company announced Friday.

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Seoul to provide smartphone-charging down by the stream

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Seoul’s mobile users will be able to make use of outdoor charging stations at a popular downtown stream, powered by mini-hydroelectric turbines that use the stream’s current. The city is building the recharging stations along the Cheonggyecheon, which is a manmade stream in the city’s downtown area. The Seoul metropolitan city government said on Wednesday that the plan is to make available smartphone recharging booths near Cheonggyecheon, or Cheonggye Stream in Seoul, with the small amount of electricity that is generated from t he flowing water, said Korea Bizwire. On Wednesday, city officials installed three small-sized hydroelectric generators on the Gwangtong Bridge on the stream, and two more generators in the walking trail 20 meters away. This will be a trial run, and the first time for phone-charging booths to be installed using the micro-hydroelectric generators. The city will experiment with the five generators for three months, according to the Korea Bizwire.

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Chinese e-commerce rivals challenge Alibaba

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

China’s biggest property developer has launched an e-commerce venture with Internet giants Baidu and Tencent, adding to competition for industry leader Alibaba Group.

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AUDIO: Global citizens to address climate summit

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Five hundred global citizens frustrated at the stalemate over climate policy will learn today if they have won the chance to vent their anger at world leaders.

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Australia’s consumer watchdog sues US games giant Valve

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Australia’s consumer watchdog Friday said it was taking online US video games giant Valve to court for allegedly making "false or misleading representations" and refusing to offer refunds.

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Museum to display 6,500-year-old human skeleton

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

The public will soon get to see an ancient human skeleton recently rediscovered in a Philadelphia museum’s storage room.

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Tesla, Chinese firm to build 400 charging stations

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Tesla Motors Co. and a state-owned Chinese phone carrier have announced plans to build 400 charging stations for electric cars.

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USDA seizes more than 1,200 illegal giant snails

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

The giant African snail damages buildings, destroys crops and can cause meningitis in humans. But some people still want to collect, and even eat, the slimy invaders.

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2.6m historic pictures posted online

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

An academic is posting millions of historic photos and illustrations to Flickr where they can be searched and copied without charge.

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GCHQ protest over surveillance case

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

The first of three days of protest by online activists is due to take place at the UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ).

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After Great Recession, Americans are unhappy, worried, pessimistic, study finds

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

The protracted and uneven recovery from the Great Recession has led most Americans to conclude that the U.S. economy has undergone a permanent change for the worse, according to a new national study at Rutgers. Seven in 10 now say the recession’s impact is permanent, up from half in 2009 when the recession officially ended, according to the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development. Among key findings in "Unhappy, Worried and Pessimistic: Americans in the Aftermath of the Great Recession," the center’s latest Work Trends report, are:

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Mobile app makes ID of harmful plants, insects in Texas a snap

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

A free mobile app called TX Invasives is now available from the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at The University of Texas at Austin for identifying harmful non-native plant, insect and other invasive species statewide.

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Researchers use NASA and other data to look into the heart of a solar storm

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

A space weather storm from the sun engulfed our planet on Jan. 21, 2005. The event got its start on Jan. 20, when a cloud of solar material, a coronal mass ejection or CME, burst off the sun and headed toward Earth. When it arrived at our planet, the ring current and radiation belts surrounding Earth swelled with extra particles, while the aurora persisted for six hours. Both of these are usually signs of a very large storm – indeed, this was one of the largest outpouring of solar protons ever monitored from the sun. But the storm barely affected the magnetic fields around Earth – disturbances in these fields can affect power grids on the ground, a potential space weather effect keenly watched for by a society so dependent on electricity

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Google building fleet of package-delivering drones

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Google’s secretive research laboratory is trying to build a fleet of drones designed to bypass earthbound traffic so packages can be delivered to people more quickly.

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VIDEO: RSPCA seeks ban on monkeys as pets

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

The RSPCA is calling for a ban on keeping primates as pets after a rise in the number of calls to its cruelty and advice line concerning animals such as monkeys and marmosets.

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Breakthrough in light sources for new quantum technology

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

One of the most promising technologies for future quantum circuits are photonic circuits, i.e. circuits based on light (photons) instead of electrons (electronic circuits). First, it is necessary to create a stream of single photons and control their direction. Researchers around the world have made all sorts of attempts to achieve this, but now scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute have succeeded in creating a steady stream of photons emitted one at a time and in a particular direction.

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UN seeks climate change ‘Malala’

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Five hundred people will learn tomorrow if they have won the chance to vent their frustration at world leaders over the global citizens stalemate over climate policy.

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Real tremors, or drug-seeking patient? New app can tell

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

New University of Toronto smartphone uses data from built-in accelerometer to measure the frequency of alcohol withdrawal tremors.

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AIDS Progress in South Africa Is in Peril

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Though few Americans realize it, South Africa owes much of its success in the fight against AIDS to a single United States program — one that is now moving elsewhere.

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Dot Earth Blog: Accounting for the Expanding Carbon Shadow from Coal-Burning Plants

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

A pitch for considering a lifetime’s worth of carbon dioxide emissions when examining power plants in the context of climate change.

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Bits Blog: Google Joins Amazon in Dreams of Drone Delivery

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Who needs UPS trucks and bicycle delivery when you can fly in things people buy online?

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Ion beams simulate nuclear-reactor damage

Written By: admin - Aug• 29•14

Seven years in a reactor recreated in just four days

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