Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Revamped Website to Offer News on New York City Public Schools

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

WNYC, WNBC, WNJU and the New York Daily News will introduce a site with information in English, Spanish and Chinese, and with individual school pages that are easier to understand.

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Bits Blog: Giving Away Software to Make It More Valuable

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Continuuity, a big-data start-up that spent three years developing data-analysis software, is donating it to the world as open source, and big business is taking notice.

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Bits Blog: For Some Tech Start-Ups Like Ello, Exclusivity Draws Demand

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Why all the fuss about Ello, a new social network that is some amalgam of Twitter, Facebook and Medium, the online publishing start-up, rolled into one?

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Bits Blog: The Business Case for Diversity in the Tech Industry

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Google argues that a diverse work force can help it come up with better products.

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Bits Blog: 100 Million Smart Things: A Conversation With Scott McGregor of Broadcom

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

The chief executive of Broadcom predicts a future of total facial recognition, DNA-based signatures and chips in our brains, and he wants his company’s semiconductors to be a part of all of it.

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Bits Blog: Examining the Amazon Way

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Amazon’s accomplishments are dwarfed only by its ambitions. A former executive talks about the potential and the perils as the retailer enters its third decade, as well as why the dispute with Hachette is so important.

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Bits Blog: Court Upholds Ban on Uber in Berlin

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

The court agreed with the local authorities in the German capital, which ruled in August that Uber did not have the proper licenses or safety checks in place to operate in the city.

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Bits Blog: Intel Invests $1.5 Billion to Tap Mobile Phone Chip Market in China

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Intel is spending big money to invest in a Chinese maker of systems for mobile phones in hopes of capturing more of the chip market and to leap past competitors like Qualcomm.

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With Perspective From Both Sides of His Desk, F.C.C. Chairman Ponders Net Neutrality

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Tom Wheeler spent decades as a lobbyist for the cable and wireless industries, experience from which he has drawn in creating highly scrutinized policy guidelines for ensuring equal access to online content.

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On the Hunt for a Sprite on a Midsummer’s Night

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Citizen scientists are hunting sprites, majestic emanations of light that flash for an instant high above storm clouds whose effects on the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere remain an open question.

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Cosmic ray blitz: Space invaders that fry electronics

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Intergalactic visitors threaten to bring chaos to our electronic world. Is there anything we can do?

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Cosmic ray blitz: Space invaders that fry electronics

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Intergalactic visitors threaten to bring chaos to our electronic world. Is there anything we can do?

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Post-Snowden, iPhone 6 encryption fans safety debate

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Encryption technology in the iPhone 6 has taken root in a scales-of-justice debate between privacy supporters and public safety officials. Apple is using a more advanced encryption technology.

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News Analysis: President’s Drive for Carbon Pricing Fails to Win at Home

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

The United States, which is under growing international pressure to price carbon, is missing from a World Bank declaration calling on all nations to enact laws forcing industries to pay for carbon emissions.

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Hyperspectral imaging shines light on the early Finns’ life in the Stone Age

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

The 5,500 years old clay figurines found at community excavations in Vantaa, Finland in summer 2014, were recently scanned with SPECIM’s hyperspectral camera. The imaging revealed that clay in the figurines was similar to clay on the ground at the excavation site. The figurines were scanned with Fenix, the full-spectral sensor installed in the SisuROCK scanner. It is similar to the AisaFENIX, the full-spectral sensor for remote sensing.

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Tech-friendly cities struggle with new biz rules

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

(AP)—Boston and Cambridge are looking to regulate online and mobile-based businesses like Airbnb, Uber and Lyft, making the tech-friendly cities unlikely participants in fights over how to deal with such services.

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Human genome was shaped by an evolutionary arms race with itself

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

New findings by scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, suggest that an evolutionary arms race between rival elements within the genomes of primates drove the evolution of complex regulatory networks that orchestrate the activity of genes in every cell of our bodies. The arms race is between mobile DNA sequences known as ‘retrotransposons’ (a.k.a. ‘jumping genes’) and the genes that have evolved to control them.

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Researchers identify early sign of pancreatic cancer

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and other institutions have discovered a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer — an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs before the disease is diagnosed and symptoms appear. The research is being published online today by the journal Nature Medicine.

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Human genome was shaped by an evolutionary arms race with itself

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

New findings by scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, suggest that an evolutionary arms race between rival elements within the genomes of primates drove the evolution of complex regulatory networks that orchestrate the activity of genes in every cell of our bodies.

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Turkey’s Erdogan dismisses new iPhone: ‘Same as the last’

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, known for his hostility to social networks and mobile technology, on Sunday brushed off the frenzy surrounding Apple’s new iPhone 6, saying it was much the same as its iPhone 5 predecessor.

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China busts smugglers of iPhone 6 in Shanghai

Written By: admin - Sep• 29•14

(AP)—China in recent days has busted a slew of smugglers bringing Apple iPhone 6 models into the country ahead of their official release here, with officials on Sunday reporting the latest seizure of 453 smartphones in Shanghai.

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Tech sector sizzles as Myanmar embraces Internet for the masses

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

From navigating gridlocked city roads to playing a favourite national sport, new homegrown apps are blossoming in Myanmar as cheap mobile technology ignites an Internet revolution in the once-isolated nation.

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Inventor of World Wide Web warns of threat to internet

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

The British inventor of the World Wide Web warned on Saturday that the freedom of the internet is under threat by governments and corporations interested in controlling the web.

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India turns to nuclear as energy crisis deepens

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

India’s new prime minister is turning to nuclear energy to ease a power crisis made worse by the cancellation of hundreds of coal mining permits, but he faces scepticism both at home and abroad.

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Hurricane Rachel churns in Pacific off Mexico

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Tropical Storm Rachel strengthened to hurricane force Saturday as it swirled off Mexico’s Pacific coast, a region already buffeted by major storms this season.

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Washington’s experts recruit ‘Call of Duty’ creator

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

A Washington think tank is recruiting the mastermind behind the best-selling "Call of Duty" video games to help policy wonks imagine future wars America may have to fight.

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‘Anti-Facebook’ social network gets viral surge

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

In a matter of days, the new social network Ello, described as the "anti-Facebook" for its stand on privacy and advertising, has become perhaps the hottest ticket on the Internet.

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Russia successfully launches Proton-M rocket after accident

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Russia on Sunday successfully launched a Proton-M rocket carrying a satellite into orbit in the first such launch since one of the rockets fell back to Earth soon after liftoff in May.

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Writers and readers go mobile and social at Wattpad

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Allen Lau considers himself living proof that love of good writing is alive and well in the age of streaming video and terse text messages.

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More than 30 believed dead at Japanese volcano

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

(AP)—Rescue workers on Sunday found more than 30 people unconscious and believed to be dead near the peak of an erupting volcano, a Japanese police official said.

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Roche Breast Cancer Drug Appears to Greatly Extend Patients’ Lives

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Perjeta, approved by the F.D.A. in 2012, prolonged median survival time about 16 months in a trial of 808 people with metastatic breast cancer.

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A Rare Arctic Land Sale Stirs Concerns in Norway

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

A Chinese businessman with deep pockets is looking to buy land in Norway, creating a frenzy of speculation about moves by China to gain a permanent foothold in the Arctic.

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A Battle to Keep Trees, or an Industry, Standing

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

A fight continues between preservationists focused on saving ancient forests and wildlife and an agency bound by politics and tradition to loggers, mills and economic development.

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In Liberia and U.S., Precautions for Two Ebola Workers

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

As Liberia’s chief medical officer is placing herself under quarantine, the U.S. prepares to admit an American doctor who was exposed to Ebola in Sierra Leone.

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News Analysis: Building an Ark for the Anthropocene

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Scientists are trying to figure out which species to save, and how.

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News Analysis: President’s Drive for Carbon Pricing Fails to Win at Home

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

The United States, which is under growing international pressure to price carbon, is missing from a World Bank declaration calling on all nations to enact laws forcing industries to pay for carbon emissions.

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The Unrepentant Bootlegger

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Hana Beshara remembers her time with a popular illegal video downloading site as one of adventure and camaraderie, although she wound up spending time in prison.

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Bits Blog: 100 Million Smart Things: A Conversation With Scott McGregor of Broadcom

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

The chief executive of Broadcom predicts a future of total facial recognition, DNA-based signatures and chips in our brains, and he wants his company’s semiconductors to be a part of all of it.

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Volcano erupts in Japan; 7 missing, 40 injured

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

(AP)—A volcano in central Japan erupted in spectacular fashion on Saturday, catching mountain climbers by surprise and stranding at least 40 injured people in areas that rescue workers have been unable to reach. Another seven people were missing.

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Bits Blog: Giving Away Software to Make It More Valuable

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Continuuity, a big-data start-up that spent three years developing data-analysis software, is donating it to the world as open source, and big business is taking notice.

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Quad Theatre: Cirque du Soleil’s flying lampshades

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Dance of the Quadcopters? Cirque du Soleil, ETH Zurich, and Verity Studios have partnered to develop a film that shows 10 quadcopters in performance. What would one expect with the name-brand Cirque du Soleil. Humans and drones move in sync. ETH Zurich comes into the mix with precise computer control for the performance of human and machine movements. The technology team would be tasked with achieving seamless coordination of multiple vehicles, designing suitable trajectories and high-reliability infrastructure to pull off a successful film shoot.

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Strategies: $199 Apple iPhone 6 Is Fiction, if Not Fantasy

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Investors as well as consumers might want to look closely at the purchase plans that carriers are offering for Apple’s new iPhone 6.

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Prototype: Using Robotics to Teach Computer Programming

Written By: admin - Sep• 28•14

Parents who were frustrated by a lack of opportunities for their children to learn programming have designed products meant to appeal to children as young as 5.

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MH370: Seabed images to support inch-by-inch plane search

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

While a team of experts’ main goal is to locate the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 that disappeared in March, their search has turned up seabed details that reveal extinct volcanoes and 1,400-meter depressions for the first time, said Richard Westcott, BBC Transport Correspondent, on Friday.

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VIDEO: Volcano erupts in central Japan

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Mount Ontake in Japan erupted on Saturday, sending a large plume of ash into the sky.

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‘Cloaking’ device uses ordinary lenses to hide objects across range of angles

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Inspired perhaps by Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak, scientists have recently developed several ways—some simple and some involving new technologies—to hide objects from view. The latest effort, developed at the University of Rochester, not only overcomes some of the limitations of previous devices, but it uses inexpensive, readily available materials in a novel configuration.

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Anamorelin improve appetite and body mass in patients with cancer anorexia-cachexia

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

A new drug, anamorelin, improves appetite and body mass in patients with advanced lung cancer who are suffering cancer anorexia and cachexia, according to phase III data presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.

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Afatinib improves progression-free survival in head and neck cancer

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

The tyrosine kinase inhibitor afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival compared to methotrexate in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy, the results of a Phase III trial show.

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Rolapitant reduces nausea and vomiting in Phase III trial

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Rolapitant reduces nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy, according to the results of a Phase III trial presented for the first time today at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.

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US: Genetically modified wheat found in Montana

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—Unregulated genetically modified wheat has popped up in a second location in the United States, this time in state of Montana, the Agriculture Department said Friday.

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IPhone Locks Out the N.S.A., Signaling a Post-Snowden Era

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Intelligence agencies say the move, in which the iPhone 6 creates a unique code that scrambles information, is the first of new technologies designed to defeat court orders to turn over information.

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Japan seeks to splurge on big-science facilities

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Education ministry asks for 18% increase in annual spending

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BlackBerry Posts a Loss, But Shows Signs of Life

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

The company stressed its new focus on services and software for business, despite unveiling the Passport, an unusual new smartphone, just two days earlier.

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‘Turtle smuggling’ Canadian arrested

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

A Canadian man is charged with wildlife smuggling after guards at the US border found 51 turtles in his trousers, authorities have said

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Facebook Lawsuit Over Search Warrants Can Proceed, a Court in Manhattan Rules

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

An appellate decision paves the way for oral arguments over whether Manhattan prosecutors violated the constitutional rights of 381 users by obtaining search warrants for nearly everything in their files.

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DealBook: Activist Hedge Fund Pushes Yahoo to Weigh a Deal With AOL

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

As Yahoo tries to figure out what to do after raising $6 billion from its stake in the Alibaba Group, a prominent investor, Starboard Value, has emerged to offer some suggestions — including buying AOL.

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Scientists discover new poison dart frog species in Donoso, Panama

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

A bright orange poison dart frog with a unique call was discovered in Donoso, Panama, and described by researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí in Panama, and the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia. In the species description published this week in Zootaxa, it was named Andinobates geminisae for Geminis Vargas, "the beloved wife of [coauthor] Marcos Ponce, for her unconditional support of his studies of Panamanian herpetology."

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Apple says Mac users mostly safe from ‘Bash’ bug

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Apple said Friday that its Macintosh PCs are unlikely to be affected by the recently discovered "Bash" bug that could hit millions of computers and other devices connected to the Internet.

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Bits Blog: Companies Rush to Fix Shellshock Software Bug as Hackers Launch Thousands of Attacks

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Security experts advised home users to stay on top of software updates and check manufacturer’s websites, particularly for hardware like routers.

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The scarring effects of primary-grade retention?

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

An article released by Social Forces titled, "The Scarring Effects of Primary-Grade Retention? A Study of Cumulative Advantage in the Educational Career" by Megan Andrew explores the effect of scarring in the educational career in the case of primary-grade retention. Just as is the case for labor-market careers, events early in the educational career can leave lasting scars. Through the study, Andrew finds that primary-grade retention has lasting effects on educational attainments well after a student is initially retained: Retaining a child in early primary school reduces his or her odds of high school completion by about 60 percent in propensity score matching and sibling fixed-effects models.

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Changes ordered at Los Alamos over nuke waste leak

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—Federal officials say four Los Alamos National Laboratory workers have been reassigned, and the Department of Energy is pulling nuclear waste cleanup operations from the contractor that runs the lab.

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Preference for built-up habitats could explain rapid spread of the tree bumblebee in UK

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

The strikingly rapid spread of the Tree Bumblebee in Britain could be occurring because the bees readily live alongside humans in towns and villages – according to research from the University of East Anglia.

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Poor fish harvests more frequent now off California coast

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

As a child in southern California, Ryan Rykaczewski spent a fair amount of time on his grandfather’s boat, fishing with him off the Pacific coast near Los Angeles. At the time, he didn’t think there was much rhyme or reason to their luck on the water.

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Chile enacts higher taxes to fund schools

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—Chile is enacting measures that raise taxes on large businesses to help finance improvements in education, health and other services.

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Ebola Doctor Shortage Eases as Volunteers Begin to Step Forward

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Even with the volunteers, experts say, there will be a long gap before hospitals can be fully staffed to care for the growing numbers of Ebola patients.

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India’s Mars triumph signals a rising space power

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

With a low-cost Mars mission in the win column, the Indian space programme is setting its sights on more ambitious goals elsewhere in the solar system

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German military struggles with hardware problems

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—First a group of German army instructors got stranded in Bulgaria en route to Iraq when their plane malfunctioned.

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Activist investor pushes Yahoo to buy rival AOL

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—An activist investor is urging Yahoo to buy rival AOL to help the long-struggling Internet companies to become more competitive in a digital advertising market currently dominated by Google and Facebook.

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Can cartoons be used to teach machines to understand the visual world?

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

An enormous gap exists between human abilities and machine performance when it comes to understanding the visual world from images and videos. Humans are still way out in front.

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European Space Agency sets date for comet landing

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—The European Space Agency says it will attempt to land the first spacecraft on a comet on Nov. 12.

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Universal Health Services makes $335M UK purchase

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—Hospital operator Universal Health Services said Friday it acquired Cygnet Health Care of the U.K. for $335 million.

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NASA sees Tropical Storm Kammuri’s spiral bands of soaking thunderstorms

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Tropical Storm Kammuri continues to strengthen on its north-northwestern track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and NASA’s TRMM satellite identified a band of thunderstorms containing heavy rainfall northwest of the storm’s center. Meanwhile NASA’s Aqua satellite got a look at the entire storm and saw that those bands of storms circled the entire storm.

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Sensitive youngsters

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Young individuals of a species are often more sensitive towards environmental stress than their adult counterparts. Scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel now observed this effect in the sea star Asterias rubens from the Baltic Sea. In a long-term laboratory experiment that was conducted in the framework of the German research network BIOACID (Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification), the researchers simulated three different levels of acidification that could be reached in the Baltic Sea by the uptake of additional carbon dioxide (CO2) within the coming decades.

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Penn team studies nanocrystals by passing them through tiny pores

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

An interdisciplinary team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has now applied a cutting-edge technique for rapid gene sequencing toward measuring other nanoscopic structures. By passing nanoscale spheres and rods through a tiny hole in a membrane, the team was able to measure the electrical properties of those structures’ surfaces.

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Aid sought for pioneering hacker

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Friends of legendary hacker John Draper, aka Captain Crunch, are seeking help to pay his medical bills.

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NASA identifies cold cloud tops in Tropical Storm Rachel

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

NASA’s Aqua satellite saw the area of strong thunderstorms with colder cloud tops had grown within the Eastern Pacific Ocean’s Tropical Storm Rachel.

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Times Insider: How a Times Cybersecurity Reporter Protects Her Data. And What You Can Do to Protect Yours.

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Times technology reporter Nicole Perlroth shares her thoughts on cybersecurity, on how she protects her online identity, and how you should protect yours.

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Google urged to change privacy rules

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

EU data watchdogs move again to persuade Google to change its privacy policies which were consolidated two years ago.

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Dot Earth Blog: Certainties, Uncertainties and Choices with Global Warming

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

We can be certain about climate change uncertainty but still address the risk.

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‘Multi-spectra glasses’ for scanning electron microscopy

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

The scanning electron microscope is not only used for precisely surveying the surface topology of samples, but also for determining their chemical compositions. This is done by exciting the atoms to fluoresce under irradiation by an electron beam while scanning the sample. This secondary emission provides information about the location and type of element, insofar as the analysis is sufficiently precise. However, the lighter elements of the periodic table such as lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, and nitrogen emit secondary fluorescence in an energy range that cannot be sufficiently well resolved by energy dispersive spectrometers (EDS).

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New technology tracks tiniest pollutants in real time

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Researchers may soon have a better idea of how tiny particles of pollution are formed in the atmosphere. These particles, called aerosols, or particulate matter (PM), are hazardous to human health and contribute to climate change, but researchers know little about how their properties are shaped by chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Unraveling this chemistry could someday lead to more effective policies to protect human health and the Earth’s climate.  

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European flight safety regs: Electronics allowed

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—Europe’s air safety agency has issued new guidelines allowing passengers to use portable electronics including cell phones and tablet computers any time during flights.

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Bloodhound Diary: The ultimate ‘kit car’

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

The complexities of assembling the ultimate kit

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Researchers elucidate how a nitrogen-fixing enzyme also produces hydrocarbons

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Plants need nitrogen and carbon to grow. Photosynthesis allows them to take in the latter directly from the air, but they have to procure nitrogen through their roots in the form of organic molecules like ammonia or urea. Even though nitrogen gas makes up approximately 80 percent of Earth’s atmosphere, the plant can only access it in a bound – or ‘fixed’ – form. Farmers thus use fertilizers to provide their crops with nitrogen. The only living beings that can convert nitrogen from the air into usable molecules are microorganisms – for example nodule bacteria. They possess the enzyme nitrogenase, which combines nitrogen with hydrogen to form ammonium.

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Scientists revolutionize solar power with new "gold nanocluster" technology

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Scientists at Western University have discovered that a small molecule created with just 144 atoms of gold can increase solar cell performance by more than 10 per cent. These findings, published recently by the high-impact journal Nanoscale, represent a game-changing innovation that holds the potential to take solar power mainstream and dramatically decrease the world’s dependence on traditional, resource-based sources of energy, says Giovanni Fanchini from Western’s Faculty of Science.

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Turning the moon into a cosmic ray detector

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Scientists from the University of Southampton are to turn the Moon into a giant particle detector to help understand the origin of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic rays – the most energetic particles in the Universe.

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Green light for clever algae

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Phytoplankton not only constitutes the foundation of the food chain in the oceans, it also fixes carbon through photosynthesis and generates oxygen with the help of solar energy. A considerable part of phytoplankton is made up of cryptophytes, complex single-cell algae. In the course of evolution, these algae have adapted their light-harvesting mechanisms to their environment and have thus become capable of utilising green light. The researchers headed by Prof Dr Nicole Frankenberg-Dinkel have been the first ones to reveal similarities and differences in the assembly of the light-harvesting machinery of the cryptophyte Guillardia theta compared to cyanobacteria and red algae. The publication of their results in the current issue of "The Journal of Biological Chemistry" is among the two per cent of the publications that were selected as "Paper of the week".

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Experiment makes Schrodinger’s cat choose—things can be real, or certain, but not both

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Experimenting within quantum theory is an extremely complex process, where common intuitions are regularly inverted within shifting reality. Over the years several quantum features and methods of their study have been identified. Now scientists have investigated a new set of assumptions and proposed a novel experiment, to test the consequences of making quantum theory more intuitive.

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BlackBerry posts $207 million loss

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—BlackBerry posted a loss of $207 million in the second quarter on Friday just days after the embattled company launched a new phone.

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Official: Wreck off Haiti likely not Columbus ship

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—Haiti’s culture minister says a shipwreck off the country’s north coast probably isn’t a lost flagship of Christopher Columbus as a U.S. explorer has claimed.

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Colour variability in Crimson Rosellas is linked to a virus

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Despite its name, the Crimson Rosella is perhaps Australia’s most colour-variable bird and a cause of this striking and beautiful diversity seems to be a disease that’s potentially deadly to many other parrots.

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If trees could talk: Forest research network reveals global change effects

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Permafrost thaw drives forest loss in Canada, while drought has killed trees in Panama, southern India and Borneo. In the U.S., in Virginia, over-abundant deer eat trees before they reach maturity, while nitrogen pollution has changed soil chemistry in Canada and Panama. Continents apart, these changes have all been documented by the Smithsonian-led Center for Tropical Forest Science-Forest Global Earth Observatory, CTFS-ForestGEO, which released a new report revealing how forests are changing worldwide.

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More legal woes for rideshare app Uber in Germany

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

(AP)—Popular ridesharing service Uber is facing more legal issues in Germany after a Berlin court upheld the capital’s ban on the app.

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DealBook: Yahoo Faces Moment of Decision, Again

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

The company could use the proceeds from the Alibaba share sale to go on an acquisition spree to help reinvent itself but many investors have been underwhelmed by previous takeover efforts.

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No sign of health or nutrition problems from GMO livestock feed, study finds

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

A new scientific review from the University of California, Davis, reports that the performance and health of food-producing animals consuming genetically engineered feed, first introduced 18 years ago, has been comparable to that of animals consuming non-GE feed.

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Hubble team finds male led teams still getting more telescope time than those led by females

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

Researchers at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) which runs the Hubble Space Telescope program, have found that there continues to be a gap between the number of projects given the go-ahead by male principle investigators (PIs) versus those headed by females.

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New research points to graphene as a flexible, low-cost touchscreen solution

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

New research published today in the journal Advanced Functional Materials suggests that graphene-treated nanowires could soon replace current touchscreen technology, significantly reducing production costs and allowing for more affordable, flexible displays.

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India’s MOM captures first image of the red planet

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

India’s "history creating" maiden interplanetary voyager, the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) has captured her historic first image of the Red Planet.

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Molting Tougher on the Mayfly Than Previously Thought

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

It’s not easy being a mayfly. Mayflies are insects that spend most of their life in water and provide clues about the health of our streams and other waterways.

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DealBook: Yahoo Faces Moment of Decision, Again

Written By: admin - Sep• 27•14

The company could use the proceeds from the Alibaba share sale to go on an acquisition spree to help reinvent itself but many investors have been underwhelmed by previous takeover efforts.

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