Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Anticipating the 2017 solar eclipse

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Where will YOU be on August 21st, 2017?

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Polyethylene mulch, glazing create optimal conditions for soil solarization

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Soil solarization, a process that uses solar radiation to rid the soil of pests, is most common in regions with high solar radiation and high temperatures during the summer season. An alternative to soil fumigation, the process is used either alone or in combination with fumigants. To accomplish solarization, solar radiation is used to passively heat moist soil covered with clear plastic sheeting, with the goal of increasing soil temperatures to the point where they are lethal to soilborne organisms. The effectiveness of solarization is based on the actual maximum soil temperature reached and the amount of time the high temperatures can be sustained.

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Novel robotic walker helps patients regain natural gait

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Survivors of stroke or other neurological conditions such as spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries and Parkinson’s disease often struggle with mobility. To regain their motor functions, these patients are required to undergo physical therapy sessions. A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Faculty of Engineering has invented a novel robotic walker that helps patients carry out therapy sessions to regain their leg movements and natural gait. The system also increases productivity of physiotherapists and improves the quality of rehabilitation sessions.

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Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Worldwide, drought conditions, extreme temperatures, and high soil saline content all have negative effects on tomato crops. These natural processes reduce soil nutrient content and lifespan, result in reduced plant growth and yield, and ultimately translate to lower profits for tomato producers. As an alternative to unsustainable practices such as the use of synthetic fertilizers, producers are looking to environment-friendly soil ameliorants such as verimcompost leachate, an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material and casts that occur during the vermicomposting process.

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When shareholders exacerbate their own banks’ crisis

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Banks are increasingly issuing ‘CoCo’ bonds to boost the levels of equity they hold. In a crisis situation, bondholders are forced to convert these bonds into a bank’s equity. To date, such bonds have been regarded only as a means of averting a crisis. A study by German economists now shows that if such bonds are badly constructed, they worsen a crisis instead of stabilizing the banking system.

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Trouble with your boss? Own it

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Don’t get along with your boss? Your job performance may actually improve if the two of you can come to grips with the poor relationship.

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CERN makes public first data of LHC experiments

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

CERN today launched its Open Data Portal where data from real collision events, produced by experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will for the first time be made openly available to all. It is expected that these data will be of high value for the research community, and also be used for education purposes.

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The unknown crocodiles

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Just a few years ago, crocodilians – crocodiles, alligators and their less-known relatives – were mostly thought of as slow, lazy, and outright stupid animals. You may have thought something like that yourself the last time you were in a zoo and saw them lying still for hours, making people wonder if they were alive or made of plastic.

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Why the Rosetta mission is this generation’s moon landing

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

The thing everyone seems to talk about with the moon landings is the idea of the whole world stopping to watch. It was a mission that overcame nationalism, it wasn’t "America" putting a man on the moon, it was "Us" – humankind. With Rosetta, the whole world not only watched but they were part of a real-time conversation with mission control.

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Gene responsible for cholesterol production could lead to potatoes with lower toxin levels

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

In many parts of the world, potatoes are a reliable dietary staple. However, potato plants also produce the toxins solanine and chaconine, which can protect growing sprouts from potential predators such as insects and fungi. These toxins, known as steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs), occur at very low levels in the edible tubers, but their levels in green skin and sprouts can be highly poisonous and even deadly to humans.

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Cohesin molecule safeguards cell division

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

The cohesin molecule ensures the proper distribution of DNA during cell division. Scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna can now prove the concept of its carabiner-like function by visualizing for the first time the open form of the complex. The journal Science publishes the new findings in its current issue.

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Erosion may trigger earthquakes

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Researchers from laboratories at Géosciences Rennes (CNRS/Université de Rennes 1), Géosciences Montpellier (CNRS/Université de Montpellier 2) and Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (CNRS/IPGP/Université Paris Diderot), in collaboration with a scientist in Taiwan, have shown that surface processes, i.e. erosion and sedimentation, may trigger shallow earthquakes (less than five kilometers deep) and favor the rupture of large deep earthquakes up to the surface. Although plate tectonics was generally thought to be the only persistent mechanism able to influence fault activity, it appears that surface processes also increase stresses on active faults, such as those in Taiwan, one of the world’s most seismic regions. The work is published in Nature Communications on 21 November 2014.

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Laser scanning accurately ‘weighs’ trees

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A terrestrial laser scanning technique that allows the structure of vegetation to be 3D-mapped to the millimetre is more accurate in determining the biomass of trees and carbon stocks in forests than current methods, according to new research involving UCL.

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3Qs: Game theory and global climate talks

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Last week, China and the United States announced an ambitious climate agreement aimed at reducing carbon emissions in both countries, a pledge that marks the first time that China has agreed to stop its growing emissions. Leaders of both nations hope the agreement will lead to a global consensus on emissions reduction, with one senior official in the Obama administration saying that the deal "will signal to countries around the world that this negotiation has serious legs and there is a real chance of this coming together."

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Researchers study impact of power prosthetic failures on amputees

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Powered lower limb prosthetics hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, but errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall. New research examines exactly what happens when these technologies fail, with the goal of developing a new generation of more robust powered prostheses.

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Bits Blog: Malicious Software Said to Spread on Android Phones

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Lookout, a security company, says it has been tracking malware that over the last two years has become more sophisticated as it hit millions of devices.

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Jumping hurdles in the RNA world

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Astrobiologists have shown that the formation of RNA from prebiotic reactions may not be as problematic as scientists once thought.

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Cameras detect ‘extinct’ wallabies near Broome

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Yawuru Country Managers have found a spectacled hare wallaby (Lagorchestes conspicillatus) population, a species which for the last decade was feared to be locally extinct at Roebuck Plains, adjacent to Broome.

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Forging a photo is easy, but how do you spot a fake?

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Faking photographs is not a new phenomenon. The Cottingley Fairies seemed convincing to some in 1917, just as the images recently broadcast on Russian television, purporting to be satellite images showing the MH17 airliner being fired upon by a jet fighter, may have convinced others.

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Engineers develop gift guide for parents

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Faculty and staff in Purdue University’s College of Engineering have come up with a holiday gift guide that can help engage children in engineering concepts.

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Multiphysics invisibility cloak manipulates both electric current and heat

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Invisibility cloaks can make objects invisible not just to light in the visible part of the spectrum, but to many other physical excitations. These include acoustic waves, matter waves, heat flux, and infrared or ultraviolet electromagnetic (EM) waves. But so far, any single invisibility cloak can manipulate only one of these types of excitations.

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Researchers discover a nitrogen sensor widespread in the plant kingdom

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Quantitatively, nitrogen is one of the most important nutrients for the growth of plant organisms – from simple green algae to highly developed flowering plants. Nitrogen supply is essential for the development of all cell components, and as a good supply results in faster plant growth, it is commonly used as a fertiliser in agriculture. Nitrogen is assimilated in the chloroplasts of plant cells to produce the amino acid glutamine. This molecule serves as a storage form and central distributor that feeds nitrogen into various metabolic pathways. Scientists from the research group of Professor Karl Forchhammer at the Interfaculty Institute for Microbiology and Infection Medicine have investigated how plants keep track of their nitrogen supply. In cooperation with Dr. Marcus Hartmann at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology and colleagues from the University of St. Petersburg, they discovered that plants possess a sophisticated glutamine sensor. So-called PII signalling proteins act as a "fuel gauge" for the amount of available nitrogen by measuring the glutamine concentration. This information is then used by the plants to precisely control their growth.

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‘Blockbuster’ science images

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

At this point, the blockbuster movie Interstellar has created such a stir that one would almost have to be inside a black hole not to know about it. And while the science fiction thriller may have taken some liberties with science to make its Hollywood plot work, the imagery comes straight from science—National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded science, in fact.

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Things warm up as the East Australian Current heads south

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Occasional erratic bursts southward of the East Australian Current (EAC) are thought to have moderated the weather of south-east Australia this autumn and winter and they continue to introduce tropical and sub-tropical marine species to Tasmanian waters.

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Nail stem cells prove more versatile than press ons

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

There are plenty of body parts that don’t grow back when you lose them. Nails are an exception, and a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reveals some of the reasons why.

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Employees of small, locally owned businesses have more company loyalty, study finds

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers—and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does, according to Baylor University researchers.

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BICEP2 all over again? Researchers place Higgs boson discovery in doubt

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe, faster is better. Faster means more powerful particle collisions and looking deeper into the makeup of matter. However, other researchers are proclaiming not so fast. LHC may not have discovered the Higgs Boson, the boson that imparts mass to everything, the god particle as some have called it. While the Higgs Boson discovery in 2012 culminated with the awarding in December 2013 of the Nobel Prize to Peter Higgs and François Englert, a team of researchers has raised these doubts about the Higgs Boson in their paper published in the journal Physical Review D.

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Revolutionizing the interaction between plants and bacteria

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Production of legumes, such as lentils, beans, peas and chickpeas, important for human nutrition, could increase, thanks to the contributions of a scientific group that revolutionized the study of interactions between plants and microorganisms at the University of Salamanca in Spain, leaded by Martha Trujillo Toledo.

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Bits Blog: Facebook Shuttle Bus Drivers Vote to Unionize

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

The bus drivers say they are inadequately paid and endure a stressful work schedule of split shifts.

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Aereo Files for Bankruptcy

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

The streaming television start-up said it was unable to recover from a Supreme Court decision that essentially barred its business model.

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Bits Blog: Google Play Store Opens to Chinese Developers

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Google said it would offer Chinese developers a way to sell mobile applications outside of mainland China by giving them access to its Play Store, which runs on Android phones and tablets.

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Swift gamma-ray burst mission marks ten years of discovery

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

(Phys.org) —NASA’s Swift spacecraft lifted off aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., beginning its mission to study gamma-ray bursts and identify their origins. Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the cosmos. Most are thought to be triggered when the core of a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel, collapses under its own weight, and forms a black hole. The black hole then drives jets of particles that drill all the way through the collapsing star and erupt into space at nearly the speed of light.

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New battery technology for electric vehicles

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Scientists at the Canadian Light Source are on the forefront of battery technology using cheaper materials with higher energy and better recharging rates that make them ideal for electric vehicles (EVs).

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Engineers discover new method to determine surface properties at the nanoscale

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Engineering researchers at Texas Tech University have developed a method for characterizing the surface properties of materials at different temperatures at the nanoscale.

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Knowing a ‘scurrie’ from a ‘myaave’ – women play vital role in dialect preservation

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Aberdeen researchers have discovered that women may hold the key to the preservation of traditional dialects spoken in Scottish fishing communities.

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Sonic nets viewed as a safe, humane way to shoo hungry birds

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Scarecrows have never worked, and history shows that advancements in technology haven’t worked much better when it comes to shooing birds away from ripening crops.

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World’s biggest work ship sets sail

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

The world’s largest work ship, which is capable of lifting oil rigs, has set sail from its shipyard in Korea for Rotterdam port in the Netherlands.

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Study identifies why re-educating torturers may not work

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Many human rights educators assume – incorrectly, as it turns out – that police and military officers in India who support the torture of suspects do so because they are either immoral or ignorant. This incorrect assumption weakens efforts to educate officers about human rights violations.

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Researchers hope their work will help predict which dogs may get a deadly disease

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Veterinary researchers at Cummings School are teaming with scientists at Harvard, MIT and Nestlé Purina PetCare to decipher the genetics of bloat, a common cause of death in large dogs.

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Singapore moves to regulate taxi booking apps

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Singapore on Friday announced new rules for mobile taxi booking apps, including US-based Uber, in the latest move by governments around the world to regulate the increasingly popular services.

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Cornell-developed polymer has commercial debut

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A sustainable, low-cost polymer developed by Cornell chemists has had its commercial debut.

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Data analytics give researchers a real-time view of carbon’s impact on the environment

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A group of Canadian and international researchers and graduate students supporting the University’s Enviro-Net project to monitor climate change are now using IBM’s InfoSphere Streams software to quickly ingest, correlate and analyze data as it arrives from more than 500 sensors implanted in some of the world’s most remote – and vulnerable – ecosystems.

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Plant immunity comes at a price

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Plants are under permanent attack by a multitude of pathogens. To win the battle against fungi, bacteria, viruses and other pathogens, they have developed a complex and effective immune system. And just as in humans, this can also overshoot its target when some of the plant’s own proteins are mistakenly identified as foreign. Such autoimmune reactions can lead to tissue defects and growth arrest, and is particularly apparent in hybrids, where two divergent immune systems meet. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, Germany, have now pinpointed the most common culprits for autoimmunity. Surprisingly, these are components of the immune system itself, which are mistakenly recognized by other immune receptors as intruders.

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Asteroid impacts on Earth make structurally bizarre diamonds

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

(Phys.org) —Scientists have argued for half a century about the existence of a form of diamond called lonsdaleite, which is associated with impacts by meteorites and asteroids. A group of scientists based mostly at Arizona State University now show that what has been called lonsdaleite is in fact a structurally disordered form of ordinary diamond.

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Research helps raise awareness of human trafficking

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Human trafficking –– or the control, ownership and sale of another human being for monetary gain –– was a common occurrence centuries ago, but many believe it doesn’t exist in this day and age and not in this country.

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From hurricanes to drought, LatAm’s volatile climate

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Sixteen years ago, Teodoro Acuna Zavala lost nearly everything when Hurricane Mitch ravaged his fields, pouring 10 days of torrential rains on Central America and killing more than 9,000 people.

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Researcher optimally isolates propylene for commercial use

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

(Phys.org) —Many people are familiar with the natural compound known as propane, used often as fuel, but less is discussed about propylene (or propene), with which propane is closely tied.

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Nintendo Tries to Energize Wii U Sales With Amiibo Toys

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A collection of toy figurines that will interact with a video game is Nintendo’s entry into an already flourishing market.

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Opinion Poll: Canada’s climate change consensus confronts Keystone

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Despite the fact that 81% of Canadians accept that temperature on Earth is increasing, Université de Montréal researchers have revealed that Canadians are generally misinformed about the science of climate change and are divided over the construction of new oil pipelines. The researchers’ study also found that 70% of Canadians perceive significant changes in weather where they live; 60% believe that weather in Canada has been getting more extreme; and 87% believe these changes are somewhat or very likely the consequence of a warming planet.

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Q&A: How to Use a VPN

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Plus, troubleshooting “file in use” messages.

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Embrace the arts, engineers told

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Engineering needs to emphasise its creative side to encourage more young people to take it up as a career, says a leading member of the profession.

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Space agency plans Mars rover from Lego bricks

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Space agency plans Mars mission with plastic bricks

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Q&A: Using a VPN

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Plus, troubleshooting “file in use” messages.

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A green transformation for pharmaceuticals

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Waste is reduced through the cheap and green development of a catalyst for the transformation of a commercially important functional group

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ESA image: Tokyo Bay, Japan from orbit

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

This image from Sentinel-1A’s radar on 11 July shows Tokyo Bay in Japan.

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Supercomputer and visualization resources lend insight into plasma dynamic

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Studying the intricacies and mysteries of the sun is physicist Wendell Horton life’s work. A widely known authority on plasma physics, his study of the high temperature gases on the sun, or plasma, consistently leads him around the world to work on a diverse range of projects that have great impact.

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Technique could let a small electrical signal change materials’ electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A new way of switching the magnetic properties of a material using just a small applied voltage, developed by researchers at MIT and collaborators elsewhere, could signal the beginning of a new family of materials with a variety of switchable properties, the researchers say.

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New 2-D quantum materials for nanoelectronics

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Researchers at MIT say they have carried out a theoretical analysis showing that a family of two-dimensional materials exhibits exotic quantum properties that may enable a new type of nanoscale electronics.

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Researchers explore future of ‘postdigital’ textbook

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

An interdisciplinary team at Arizona State University has been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation’s Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies program to conduct research on the future of the textbook.

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Police make computer hijack arrests

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Fifteen people have been arrested, including four in the UK, in connection with the hijacking of computers.

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Please clamber around the exhibit

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

The Tate Gallery goes 3D with Minecraft

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3-D printing innovation capable of making stronger, lighter metal works for auto, aerospace industries

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A Purdue innovation that produces stronger, lighter metal parts that work for the automotive and aerospace industries through a new, 3-D printing technology is being commercialized through Frontier Additive Manufacturing LLC, a Crawfordsville, Indiana-based company.

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How to keep the world’s eyes out of your webcam

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

There are concerns that thousands of private webcams around the world could be streaming live images to anybody who wishes to view them – without their owner knowing – thanks to a Russian website providing a convenient list of every camera that can be accessed.

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New semiconductor device could lead to better photodetectors

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

(Phys.org) —UCLA researchers have developed a perovskite photodetector that could reduce manufacturing costs and improve the quality of medical and commercial light sensors.

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Embrace the arts, engineers told

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Engineering needs to emphasise its creative side to encourage more young people to take it up as a career, says a leading member of the profession.

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Warnings on ‘complex’ Android virus

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Hundreds of thousands of Android phones have been infected with malware that uses handsets to send spam and buy event tickets in bulk.

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The supply doesn’t exist for California water storage expansion

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

California’s approval of a $7.5 billion water bond has bolstered prospects for expanding reservoirs and groundwater storage, but the drought-prone state can effectively use no more than a 15 percent increase in surface water storage capacity because of lack of water to fill it, according to a new analysis released Nov. 20.

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Scientists develop 3-D model of regulator protein bax

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Scientists at Freie Universität Berlin, the University of Tubingen, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH) provide a new 3D model of the protein Bax, a key regulator of cell death. When active, Bax forms pores in the membranes of mitochondria, causing the release of proteins from the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm. This in turn triggers a series of operations ending in cell death, which are often impaired in cancer cells.

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Computer hijacking arrests in UK

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Four people the UK have been arrested for allegedly being involved in hijacking computers, including spying through victims’ webcams.

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Japan orders air bag maker to conduct probe

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Japan’s transport ministry has told air bag maker Takata to conduct an internal investigation after cases of its air bags exploding triggered safety concerns in the U.S. and other countries.

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Strong undersea earthquake hits eastern Indonesia

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A strong undersea earthquake hit off the coast of eastern Indonesia on Friday, but there were no immediate reports of injuries or serious damage and officials said it was unlikely to trigger a tsunami.

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Galaxies in filaments spaced like pearls on a necklace

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

What began as a project looking at the statistics of galaxy distributions found an underlying pattern that could help astronomers learn how the universe evolved

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Embrace the arts, engineers told

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Engineering needs to emphasise its creative side to encourage more young people to take it up as a career, says a leading member of the profession.

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Algorithm, not live committee, performs author ranking

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

Thousands of authors’ works enter the public domain each year, but only a small number of them end up being widely available. So how to choose the ones taking center-stage? And how well can a machine-learning algorithm rank the most notable authors in the world? Allen B. Riddell at Dartmouth College set out to deliver some answers and he published his work, "Public Domain Rank: Identifying Notable Individuals with the Wisdom of the Crowd", on the ArXiv server.

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Researchers tease out glitches in immune system’s self-recognition

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease.

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Novel regulatory mechanism for cell division found

Written By: admin - Nov• 22•14

A protein kinase or enzyme known as PKM2 has proven to control cell division, potentially providing a molecular basis for tumor diagnosis and treatment.

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Under threat: Kenya’s iconic Nairobi national park

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

It is an image famous in a thousand postcards: giraffe, rhino and zebra pacing the savannah with city skyscrapers towering in the background.

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F.D.A. Approves Hysingla, a Powerful Painkiller

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved a long-acting opioid painkiller that contains pure hydrocodone, which some addiction experts fear will be abused.

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Ebola Spread Has Slowed in Liberia, C.D.C. Says

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The international response to the Ebola epidemic, coupled with more effective action by local communities, has stopped the exponential spread of the disease in Liberia, the C.D.C. said.

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Dot Earth Blog: Making the Most of Puberty on the Scale of a Planet

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Access to education and jobs can make the world’s huge youth population an asset.

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New 3D topological insulator is the nearest to perfection yet

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

BiSbTeSe2 behaves just how theory says it should

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Advertising: Jim Parsons, ‘Big Bang Theory’ Star, to Promote Intel as Innovator

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Mr. Parsons, who portrays the genius nerd Sheldon Cooper on the comedy series, is featured in a campaign that is scheduled to begin on Monday.

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Washington Post Releases Free App for Kindle, in First Collaboration With Amazon

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The ideas and preoccupations of Jeff Bezos, who bought The Post last year, have quietly reshaped the paper, including a new focus on international growth.

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Crowd investing opens up high finance

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

How crowd investment platforms are shaking up start-up land

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Russian site lists breached webcams

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Data privacy watchdogs are warning the public about a Russian website that provides links to breached webcams, baby monitors and CCTV feeds.

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Senators get no clear answers on air bag safety

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

There were apologies and long-winded explanations, but after nearly four hours of testimony about exploding Takata air bags, senators never got a clear answer to the question most people have: whether or not their cars are safe.

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Twitter boss launches global cash register service

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Twitter’s co-founder outlined plans to make cash registers a thing of the past on Thursday as he held a global launch for new software that he said would help small businesses grow.

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Nicaragua: Studies say canal impact to be minimal

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Officials said Thursday that studies have determined a $40 billion inter-oceanic canal across Nicaragua will have minimal impact on the environment and society, and construction is to begin next month.

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Where’s the snow? Not in Alaska’s largest city

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

One week before Thanksgiving, much of the nation is digging out from snowstorms, but the ground is bare in Alaska’s largest city.

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Former Brown dean whose group won Nobel Prize dies

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

David Greer, a doctor who co-founded a group that won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize for working to prevent nuclear war and who helped transform the medical school at Brown University, has died. He was 89.

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Glassmaker Corning toughens Gorilla Glass for smartphone screens

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

US manufacturer Corning said Thursday it was introducing a new, tougher version of its Gorilla Glass used by major smartphone makers in a bid to maintain dominance in the sector.

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VIDEO: Energy giant unveils shale gas plan

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Chemicals giant Ineos announces plans to invest up to £640m in shale gas exploration in the UK, in a bid to become the country’s leading fracking firm.

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Premier US album chart revamped to include streaming

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The Billboard chart, the benchmark for US music sales, will next week start to include streaming in its measurements to reflect the rapid growth of services such as Spotify.

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Crew finds 150-ton boulder likely left by glacier

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Workers digging an underground garage for a new hotel in Everett, Washington, recently struck something big about 30 feet below the surface.

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‘Call of Duty’ blasts past $10 bn in sales

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Blockbuster military shooter video game "Call of Duty" has blasted past $10 billion in lifetime sales, propelled by demand for the latest installment in the 11-year-old franchise.

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Uber hires team to help fix privacy issues

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Uber on Thursday scrambled to allay fears that executives at the hot car-sharing startup are gunning for journalists and spying on riders.

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Google tests replacing web ads with contributions

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

Google on Thursday began rolling out a way for people to support websites they frequent and, in return, be rewarded with ad-free pages.

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YouTube goes online for second Music Awards

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

The YouTube Music Awards are undergoing an overhaul for their second edition next year, scrapping a star-studded gala and instead looking at videos’ online buzz.

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Jeff Bezos Makes His Mark on Washington Post With New Kindle App

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

It is the first formal collaboration between the newspaper and Amazon since Mr. Bezos, the online giant’s founder, bought The Post for $250 million last year.

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Aggressive conifer removal benefits Sierra aspen

Written By: admin - Nov• 21•14

A study just published by Point Blue Conservation Science shows the benefits of an aggressive approach to restoring Sierra Nevada aspen stands (Populus tremuloides).

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