Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Matter: Hope for Frogs in Face of a Deadly Fungus

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A new study says amphibians can acquire defenses against a killer that has made many species extinct, and that one day a vaccine could be developed.

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Russia’s Angara rocket ‘makes debut’

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Russia launches its all new Angara rocket on a maiden flight from the northern Plesetsk military cosmodrome.

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VIDEO: Pesticide threat to wild birds

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

New research suggests that a farm pesticide which has been blamed for impacting Britain’s bee colonies may also be harming the nation’s wild birds.

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Bird decline linked to pesticide use

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A new report says the widespread use of a neonicotinoid chemical is linked to a marked decline in bird numbers in Europe.

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Colour-changing metal to yield thin, flexible displays

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Nanoscale sheets of a unique alloy can take on different hues with the flick of a switch, offering a way to make full-colour displays for wearable computers

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Website told to censor album covers

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Google tells the music website Drowned in Sound to censor album covers deemed "sexually explicit".

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Device check advice for any UK flight

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

All passengers flying into or out of the UK are advised to make sure electronic and electrical devices carried as hand luggage are charged before they travel.

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Google faces Motorola phone ban

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A company wins the right to force Motorola to stop selling phones in Germany and recall handsets already sold to business customers.

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LG unveils child-tracking tech

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

LG announces a wrist-worn device designed to let parents keep track of where their child is and listen to what they are up to.

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Standalone wearables coming this year, AT&T executive says

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The most successful wearable devices will be ones that can work without a phone, and AT&T will have at least one of them by the end of this year, the man who manages the carrier’s partnerships said. "It needs to be an independent device. It needs to do something different for the end-user, for people to buy it en masse," said Glenn Lurie, AT&T’s president of emerging enterprises and partnerships.

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Virtual body-hack lets you become someone else

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A new virtual reality system lets you control someone else’s limbs to experience living in their body. Sandrine Ceurstemont gives it a go

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U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee approves cybersecurity bill

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee approved Tuesday a cybersecurity bill that would pave the way for sharing of information between government and the private sector on security threats. Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat from California, and Vice Chairman Saxby Chambliss, a Republican from Georgia, said that the committee had approved the bill in a 12-3 vote.

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Facebook announces arrests have been made for the ‘Lecpetex’ botnet

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Facebook said police in Greece made two arrests last week in connection with a little-known spamming botnet called "Lecpetex," which used hacked computers to mine the Litecoin virtual currency. As many as 50,000 Facebook accounts were affected, and as many as 250,000 computers worldwide, primarily in Greece, Poland, Norway, India, Portugal, and the United States, according to a blog post on Tuesday from Facebook’s Threat Infrastructure team.

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Mt. Gox CEO selling Bitcoins.com, will give some proceeds to burned investors

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Mark Karpeles, CEO of the now-bankrupt Bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox, is auctioning off Bitcoins.com, a site Karpeles launched last year to provide information around the digital currency. The domain will be sold July 24 by the U.S.-based auction house Heritage Auctions, with an opening bid set at $185,000. The sale is expected to fetch as much as $750,000.

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Surface Pro 3 Wi-Fi problems persist despite a new update

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Microsoft started shipping the brand-spanking-new i5-based Surface Pro 3 on June 19. That same day, Microsoft released a firmware update for the Surface Pro 3.

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Apple loses Siri China patent case

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Apple fails to have a Chinese rival’s voice-recognition patent ruled invalid, threatening its own ability to sell Siri-enabled devices.

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Google’s Dart language is approved — but adoption is no guarantee

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Google’s Dart language, proposed by the search giant as an alternative to JavaScript, has earned some legitimacy this week: Ecma International has officially recognized the specification as a standard.

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Better patch Flash: ‘Rosetta Flash’ attack can steal site cookies

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Adobe Flash, the plug-in that refuses to die despite

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Brazil defeat breaks Twitter records

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Brazil’s shock 7-1 defeat to Germany becomes the most discussed sports game on Twitter so far, with 35.6 million tweets sent during the match.

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What price potato salad?

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Potato salad Kickstarter stokes internet ire.

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Butterfly wings inspire cosmetics and bomb detectors

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Shiny butterfly wings yield tech surprises

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What’s happening to train wi-fi?

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

How is train internet signal maintained?

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An epitaph for India’s ‘appalling’ national car

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

End of the road for the Ambassador

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Lift-off for British demo satellites

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Two UK spacecraft, including the first satellite made in Scotland, head into orbit on a Russian Soyuz rocket.

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New system would allow individuals to pick and choose what data to share with websites, mobile apps

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Cellphone metadata has been in the news quite a bit lately, but the National Security Agency isn’t the only organization that collects information about people’s online behavior. Newly downloaded cellphone apps routinely ask to access your location information, your address book, or other apps, and of course, websites like Amazon or Netflix track your browsing history in the interest of making personalized recommendations.

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Microsoft to strike back at Salesforce.com with CRM cloud for government

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Microsoft is continuing its dogfight with Salesforce.com in the customer relationship management software market with a new Dynamics CRM Online cloud service for U.S. government agencies. The service is expected to be available early next year. It will be compliant with FedRAMP (Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program) security standards, according to an official Microsoft blog post on Wednesday.

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Brazil cybertheft could be biggest ever

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A scheme that has been skimming funds from Brazilian bank payments over the past two years may be the largest cybercrime heist in history, at some $3.75 billion, security researchers say.

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UK enhances airport security measures

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Britain has authorized airport security staff to require any traveler to turn on electronic devices as a way to test for hidden explosives. France and Germany are implementing similar measures, but only for travel to and from the United States.

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Report: US spies on prominent Muslim-Americans

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

An online magazine reported Wednesday that the National Security Agency and the FBI covertly scanned the emails of five prominent Muslim-Americans under the government’s secret surveillance program aimed at foreign terrorists and other national security threats.

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Baltic capitals duel for European WiFi crown

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The Estonian tech-hub city of Tallinn has long laid claim to the title of WiFi capital of Europe – but now it has a challenger.

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Odor communication in wild gorillas

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Silverback gorillas appear to use odor as a form of communication to other gorillas, according to a study published July 9, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Michelle Klailova from University of Stirling, UK, and colleagues.

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Polar bears from space

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Polar bear population estimates based on satellite images are similar to aerial estimates, according to a study published July 9, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Seth Stapleton from United States Geological Survey and colleagues.

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Researchers declassify dinosaurs as being the great-great-grandparents of birds

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The re-examination of a sparrow-sized fossil from China challenges the commonly held belief that birds evolved from ground-dwelling theropod dinosaurs that gained the ability to fly. The birdlike fossil is actually not a dinosaur, as previously thought, but much rather the remains of a tiny tree-climbing animal that could glide, say American researchers Stephen Czerkas of the Dinosaur Museum in Blanding, Utah, and Alan Feduccia of the University of North Carolina. The study appears in Springer’s Journal of Ornithology.

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Dutch teen targets Pacific Ocean ‘plastic soup’ menace

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Dutch student Boyan Slat is only 19 years old, but he already has 100 people working on his revolutionary plan to scoop thousands of tonnes of damaging plastics from the oceans.

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‘Bee-harming’ pesticides also hit bird populations, study reports

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Already suspected of killing bees, so-called "neonic" pesticides also affect bird populations, possibly by eliminating the insects they feed upon, a Dutch study said on Wednesday.

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Bell Labs claims net speed record

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A team of researchers says it has transmitted data over traditional copper telephone lines at a record speed of 10 gigabits per second.

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Biologists link sexual selection and placenta formation

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Sexual selection refers to species’ selection for traits that are attractive to the opposite sex. This special type of natural selection enhances opportunities to mate, the tail of male peacocks being an iconic example.

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Shark teeth analysis provides detailed new look at Arctic climate change

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A new study shows that some shark species may be able to cope with the decreasing salinity of Arctic waters that may come with rising temperatures.

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Bee foraging chronically impaired by pesticide exposure, study finds

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A study co-authored by a University of Guelph scientist that involved fitting bumblebees with tiny radio frequency tags shows long-term exposure to a neonicotinoid pesticide hampers bees’ ability to forage for pollen.

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New study finds that Adelie penguin population is on the rise

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A first-ever global census of Adélie penguins shows that the population is 3.79 million breeding pairs or 53 percent larger than previously estimated. Adélie penguins have long been considered a key indicator species to monitor and understand the effects of climate change and fishing in the Southern Ocean.

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Human cells’ protein factory has an alternate operating manual

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Working with a gene that plays a critical role in HIV infection, University of Maryland researchers have discovered that some human genes have an alternate set of operating instructions written into their protein-making machinery. The alternate instructions can quickly alter the proteins’ contents, functions and ability to survive.

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Controlling contamination in open algae ponds for biofuels

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Biofuels derived from the oils produced by algae may offer a low-cost sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. To achieve this goal, optimization of cost effective strategies for large-scale algae cultivation, such as in open pond systems, is needed. Sapphire Energy has developed an innovative solution to the challenge of contamination of open pond algae cultivation systems, described in Industrial Biotechnology.

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Study predicts ranavirus as potential new culprit in amphibian extinctions

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Amphibian declines and extinctions around the world have been linked to an emerging fungal disease called chytridiomycosis, but new research from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) shows that another pathogen, ranavirus, may also contribute.

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Figuring out methane’s role in the climate puzzle

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The U.S. may be on the verge of an economy driven by methane, the primary component of natural gas, which burns cleaner than coal and is undergoing a production boom. It has poised the country as a top fuel producer globally, but recent research is casting serious doubts over just how climate-friendly it is, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

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New paths into the world of quasiparticles

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Quasiparticles can be used to explain physical phenomena in solid bodies even though they are not actual physical particles. Physicists in Innsbruck have now realized quasiparticles in a quantum system and observed quantum mechanical entanglement propagation in a many-body system. The researchers have published their work in Nature.

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Postcards from the photosynthetic edge

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A crucial piece of the puzzle behind nature’s ability to split the water molecule during photosynthesis that could help advance the development of artificial photosynthesis for clean, green and renewable energy has been provided by an international collaboration of scientists led by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

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Making a more healthful, low-fat hot dog without giving up texture

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

With grilling season upon us, many backyard cooks are turning to more healthful alternatives to their savored but fatty hot dogs. But low fat can sometimes mean low satisfaction. Now researchers are reporting new progress toward addressing the texture problem in low-fat wieners that are made with olive oil rather than pork fat. Their study was published in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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Tiny DNA pyramids enter bacteria easily—and deliver a deadly payload

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics—and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of tiny DNA pyramids. Published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, their study found the nanopyramids can flag bacteria and kill more of them than medicine alone.

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Agile Aperture Antenna Tested on Aircraft to Survey Ground Emitters, Maintain Satellite Connection

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The Georgia Tech Research Institute’s software-defined, electronically-reconfigurable Agile Aperture Antenna (A3) has now been tested on the land, sea and air.
An Agile Aperture Antenna is placed in a window of an aircraft for a recent test flight. The software-defined, electronically-reconfigurable antenna can change beam directions in a thousandth of a second. Its light weight and low power requirements make it ideal for use in UAVs. (GTRI photo)
Department of Defense representatives were in attendance during a recent event where two of the low-power devices, which can change beam directions in a thousandth of a second, were demonstrated in an aircraft during flight tests held in Virginia during February 2014. One device, looking up, maintained a satellite data connection as the aircraft changed headings, banked and rolled, while the other antenna looked down to track electromagnetic emitters on the ground.
“We were able to sustain communication with the commercial satellite in flight as the aircraft changed headings dramatically,” explained Matthew Habib, a GTRI research engineer. “The antenna was changing beam directions to compensate for the aircraft headings. At the same time, we were maintaining communication with a device on the ground.”
In addition to rapidly altering its beam direction, the antenna’s frequency and polarization can also be changed by switching active components. The prototype used in this test operates from 500 to 3000 MHz with a plus or minus 60-degree hemispherical view. The latest prototypes have been able to provide gain to 6 GHz, opening more communication options to the end user. For the flight test, GTRI collaborated with SR Technologies, Inc. (SRT), a Florida company specializing in wireless engineering products.  SRT provides mobile communications hardware including L-Band mobile satellite, 802.11 (WiFi), and cellular solutions.
An Agile Aperture Antenna is shown in the window of an aircraft for a recent test flight. The software-defined, electronically-reconfigurable antenna can change beam directions in a thousandth of a second. Its light weight and low power requirements make it ideal for use in UAVs. (GTRI photo)
For this effort, the A3 was matched with an SRT software defined radio focused on the L-Band mobile satellite frequency range.  GTRI also collaborated with Aurora Flight Sciences to fly the antennas on their Centaur optionally piloted aircraft.
Beyond its ability to be easily reconfigured, the low power consumption and flat form make the Agile Aperture Antenna ideal for aircraft such as UAVs that have small power supplies and limited surface area for integrating antennas.
“If you have a large ship or aircraft with lots of power, you can afford to use a phased-array or other type of steerable antenna,” noted Habib. “But when you are using small vehicles, especially robotic aircraft and self-sustaining vehicles that don’t include an operator, our antenna is a great solution.”
Composed of printed circuit boards, the antenna components weigh just two or three pounds.
“It’s not just about the low power and weight,” said James Strates, also a GTRI research engineer. “The simplicity of the system, the low fabrication cost and the ability to retrofit the A3 to an existing system also make it attractive to operators.”
Beyond use on aircraft, ships and ground vehicles, the antenna concept could also find application in mobile devices, where the dynamic tunability could help cut through congestion on cellular networks, noted Ryan Westafer, a GTRI research engineer.
The Agile Aperture Antenna was flight tested on this Aurora Flight Sciences Centaur optionally piloted aircraft. One antenna was configured to point up to maintain communications with a satellite, while the other pointed down to track electromagnetic emitters on the ground. (GTRI photo)
“A small electronically tunable antenna could provide a lot of new opportunities for mobile devices,” he said.
As configured for the flight tests, the upward-looking A3 antenna had a beam 30 degrees wide that could be shifted up to 60 degrees in either direction to maintain contact with the satellite. For the downward-looking antenna, the beam was automatically adjusted to “stare” at a point on the ground, reducing the interference from nearby emitters, Westafer explained.
Because it doesn’t require mechanically moving a metal dish, the A3 can change beam direction 120 degrees in a thousandth of a second, which gives it a significant response time advantage over gimbaled antennas.
The A3’s weight and complexity are also much less than for a phased-array antenna with similar capabilities. The A3 antenna uses just one static feed point, while a phased-array must feed and control each element separately. Because of its low power consumption, the A3 requires no cooling system.
The Agile Aperture Antenna has also been tested on a Wave Glider autonomous ocean vehicle. Together with previous testing on a moving ground vehicle, the new evaluations demonstrate the operational flexibility of the antenna, Habib said. So far, the A3 has operated successfully at temperatures as low as 10 degrees below zero Fahrenheit, and as high as 100 degrees Fahrenheit.
To track the satellite, the antenna uses an inertial measurement unit to provide information about the aircraft’s pitch, roll and yaw – as well as its longitude, latitude and altitude. That information is sent to a controller that turns elements off and on to the change the beam direction to maintain communication. Before takeoff, the researchers had programmed into the device the location of the commercial satellite with which it was communicating.
The challenge ahead is to take advantage of the antenna’s unique capabilities – and to affect the way operators place antennas onto ground, air and sea vehicles.
“This is changing the way that we think about integrating antennas onto systems to provide new solutions,” Habib said. “Users have not had these capabilities before, and we are excited to see how our partners will be able to take full advantage of this antenna.”
Research News
Georgia Institute of Technology
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Media Relations Contacts: Lance Wallace (404-407-7280) (lance.wallace@gtri.gatech.edu) or John Toon (404-894-6986) (jtoon@gatech.edu).
Writer: John Toon

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Matter: Hope for Frogs Facing a Deadly Fungus

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A new study says amphibians can acquire defenses against a killer that has made many species extinct, and that one day a vaccine could be developed.

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State of the Art: ‘Slender Man’ Story and the New Urban Legends

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

An attempted murder in Wisconsin is tied to Slender Man, a crowdsourced fictional character said to be a modern twist on the folklore once passed down orally.

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Russia’s Angara rocket ‘makes debut’

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Russia launches its all new Angara rocket on a maiden flight from the northern Plesetsk military cosmodrome.

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Frogs have developed rapid defences against the red swamp crayfish

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The common frog is one of the amphibians with the highest distribution in the Iberian Peninsula. It reproduces preferably in permanent areas of water where it comes into contact with the red swamp crayfish, which preys on its larvae. Research carried out by the Spaniard Germán Orizaola from the University of Uppsala (Sweden) confirms that the larvae of these frogs have developed a defensive response to the invasive species. They also have deeper tails and larger bodies if they co-exist with the crayfish.

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Climate change provides good growing conditions for charcoal rot in soybeans

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

With over 100 diseases that can attack soybean crops, why would charcoal rot rise to the top of the most wanted list? University of Illinois scientists cite the earth’s changing climate as one reason that more research is needed on the fungus that causes charcoal rot.

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New technology illuminates colder objects in deep space

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Too cool and faint, many objects in the universe are impossible to detect with visible light. Now a Northwestern University team has refined a new technology that could make these colder objects more visible, paving the way for enhanced exploration of deep space.

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Bird decline linked to pesticide use

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A new report says the widespread use of a neonicotinoid chemical is linked to a marked decline in bird numbers in Europe.

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VLT clears up dusty mystery

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A group of astronomers has been able to follow stardust being made in real time—during the aftermath of a supernova explosion. For the first time they show that these cosmic dust factories make their grains in a two-stage process, starting soon after the explosion, but continuing for years afterwards. The team used ESO’s Very Large Telescope in northern Chile to analyze the light from the supernova SN2010jl as it slowly faded.

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‘Nano-pixels’ promise thin, flexible, high resolution displays

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometres across that could pave the way for extremely high-resolution and low-energy thin, flexible displays for applications such as ‘smart’ glasses, synthetic retinas, and foldable screens.

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Colour-changing metal to yield thin, flexible displays

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Nanoscale sheets of a unique alloy can take on different hues with the flick of a switch, offering a way to make full-colour displays for wearable computers

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Urban heat—not a myth, and worst where it’s wet

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A new Yale-led study quantifies for the first time the primary causes of the "urban heat island" (UHI) effect, a common phenomenon that makes the world’s urban areas significantly warmer than the surrounding countryside and may increase health risks for city residents.

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One secret of ancient amber revealed

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The warm beauty of amber was captivating and mysterious enough to inspire myths in ancient times, and even today, some of its secrets remain locked inside the fossilized tree resin. But for the first time, scientists have now solved at least one of its puzzles that had perplexed them for decades. Their report on a key aspect of the gemstone’s architecture appears in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

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Chemists develop novel catalyst with two functions

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Chemists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have made a decisive step towards more cost-efficient regenerative fuel cells and rechargeable metal-air batteries. They developed a new type of catalyst on the basis of carbon, which can facilitate two opposite reactions: electrolysis of water and combustion of hydrogen with oxygen. A catalyst of this kind might make the storage of wind and solar energy and the manufacture of cost-efficient batteries, for example for electric cars, possible. The team published their report in the "International Edition" of the magazine Angewandte Chemie.

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Bits Blog: Uber Reaches Deal With New York on Surge Pricing in Emergencies

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The new agreement, according to the state’s attorney general’s office, would cap Uber’s surge prices during “abnormal disruptions of the market,” typically citywide emergencies.

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Even geckos can lose their grip

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Not even geckos and spiders can sit upside down forever. Nanophysics makes sure of that. Mechanics researchers at Linköping University have demonstrated this in an article just published in Physical Review E. Knowledge that can be of great industrial benefit.

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Website told to censor album covers

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Google tells the music website Drowned in Sound to censor album covers deemed "sexually explicit".

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Machine Learning: Cutting the High Cost of Digital Living

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

An audit of subscriptions can help a consumer find services that are duplicated or unneeded, or that have even been forgotten.

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The ‘yin and yang’ of malaria parasite development

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Scientists searching for new drug and vaccine targets to stop transmission of one of the world’s deadliest diseases believe they are closer than ever to disrupting the life-cycle of this highly efficient parasite.

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Device check advice for any UK flight

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

All passengers flying into or out of the UK are advised to make sure electronic and electrical devices carried as hand luggage are charged before they travel.

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Google faces Motorola phone ban

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A company wins the right to force Motorola to stop selling phones in Germany and recall handsets already sold to business customers.

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From terraforming to finding aliens, a geophysicist explains

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The Conversation organised a public question-and-answer session on Reddit in which David Waltham, reader in mathematical geology at Royal Holloway in London, explained what makes Earth so special and what life might look like beyond the Blue Planet.

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Device check advice for any UK flight

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

All passengers flying into or out of the UK are advised to make sure electronic and electrical devices carried as hand luggage are charged before they travel.

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Google picks five charities to create ideas for Glass

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Google has chosen five charities to develop ideas using Web-connected Google Glass to enhance their work.

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Without women, the computer game boom years may not last

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

An encouraging report by the International Game Developers Association recently found that women now make up 22% of the computer game workforce. This is a massive improvement from the previous figure of just 4% of the UK industry in 2009.

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Russia reports successful launch of new rocket

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Russia successfully test-launched its new Angara rocket on Wednesday after a planned maiden flight overseen by President Vladimir Putin had to be aborted last month.

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Researchers develop holography technology that could change the way we view the world

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Since the 1960s, theatergoers have shelled out for crude 3-D glasses, polarized glasses, and shutter glasses to enhance their viewing experience. These basic devices, used to trick the brain into perceiving an artificial three-dimensional reality, may soon be rendered obsolete with the introduction of new holography technology developed by Tel Aviv University researchers.

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Study shows corpse removal in ant colonies is a survival advantage

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

(Phys.org) —A trio of researchers in Belgium has found that if red ants are prevented from removing dead ants from inside of their nest, survival rates go down. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Lise Diez, Philippe Lejeune and Claire Detrain describe a study they conducted where they restricted red ants from removing their dead and the impact it had on their survival rates.

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Night-time brilliance lights up political patronage

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

In some countries, a region that can lay claim to being the birthplace of a country’s political leader is likely to get preferential treatment – bias that shines out when the intensity of night lights is compared with that in other regions.

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What lesson do rising retraction rates hold for peer review?

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

In January, Haruko Obokata and colleagues published two papers in the journal Nature suggesting that a simple acid bath can convert differentiated cells back to a stem-cell-like state. This finding, if true, would be revolutionary. Last week, however, after five months of debate among peers, the papers have been retracted.

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Device check advice for any UK flight

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

All passengers flying into or out of the UK are advised to make sure electronic and electrical devices carried as hand luggage are charged before they travel.

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Liquid crystals controlled by magnetic fields may lead to new optical applications

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

(Phys.org) —Liquid crystals are widely known for their use in LCD TVs, in which quickly changing electrical fields are used to control the molecular order of the liquid crystals. This in turn changes how light is transmitted through the liquid crystals to make the pictures change on the TV screen.

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Rockefeller scientists first to reconstitute the DNA ‘replication fork’

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

When a cell divides, it must first make a copy of its DNA, a fundamental step in the life cycle of cells that occurs billions of times a day in the human body. While scientists have had an idea of the molecular tools that cells use to replicate DNA—the enzymes that unzip the double-stranded DNA and create "daughter" copies—they did not have a clear picture of how the process works.

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Short circuit in the food web

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

They are amongst the most numerous inhabitants of the sea: tiny haptophytes of the type Emiliania huxleyi. Not visible to the naked eye, when they are in bloom in spring, they form square kilometer sized patches, they are even visible on satellite images. "Together with other phytoplankton, Emiliania huxleyi is responsible for approximately half of the global photosynthesis output," states Prof. Dr. Georg Pohnert of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany). In the process the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide – CO2 – is extracted from the atmosphere and oxygen is set free. "Additionally the microalgae use CO2 to produce tiny calcified discs which re-enforce their outer skin," the chair for Instrumental Analysis and Bio-organic Analysis continues. Thus the unicellular algae are a decisive factor for a stable world climate.

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Earth-crushing pressure? This electron spin doesn’t care

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

(Phys.org) —To fully understand something, it is often instructive to view it at its extremes. How do materials behave when their bits are forced much closer together than is comfortable? How do electrons accommodate proximity? What normal behaviors break down?

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Standalone wearables coming this year, AT&T executive says

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The most successful wearable devices will be ones that can work without a phone, and AT&T will have at least one of them by the end of this year, the man who manages the carrier’s partnerships said. "It needs to be an independent device. It needs to do something different for the end-user, for people to buy it en masse," said Glenn Lurie, AT&T’s president of emerging enterprises and partnerships.

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Almost anyone can hitchhike into space with a nanosatellite

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Earlier this year, the Russian Federal Space Agency received a hand-luggage-sized delivery from the UK. It came with a request to launch the contents aboard a rocket, along with the Russian three-tonne meteorological satellite. The tiny British package was successfully launched into space on July 8, and it contains a nanosatellite called UKube-1.

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Study charts path to low carbon in major emitting countries

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A report for the United Nations released today shows how the major emitting countries can cut their carbon emissions by mid-century in order to prevent dangerous climate change. The report, produced cooperatively by leading research institutes in 15 countries, is the first global cooperative program to identify practical pathways to a low-carbon economy by 2050. The Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP) interim report was presented in a briefing today to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon, and will presented later this week to the French government, as host of the 2015 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) climate conference. The interim report supports the UN Climate Summit on September 23, 2014. The full DDPP report will be presented in the spring of 2015.

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Knowledge exchange network releases first oil palm policy report

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A knowledge exchange network led by the University of York, which aims to increase the use of scientific evidence to guide oil palm policy, has produced its first science for policy report. The report – ‘Change in carbon stocks arising from land-use conversion to oil palm plantations’ – focuses on identifying low carbon stock landcover types which could be converted to oil palm production.

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Device check advice for any UK flight

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

All passengers flying into or out of the UK are advised to make sure electronic devices carried as hand luggage are charged before they travel.

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Virtual body-hack lets you become someone else

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A new virtual reality system lets you control someone else’s limbs to experience living in their body. Sandrine Ceurstemont gives it a go

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Testing completed on James Webb Space Telescope backplane

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

(Phys.org) —NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has reached another development milestone with the completion of static load testing of its primary mirror backplane support structure (PMBSS) moving the telescope one step closer to its 2018 launch.

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Grapevine origins examined for better drop

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

WA researchers are using cutting edge DNA sequencing to examine how grapevine genetics affect the taste and quality of Australian wines.

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Researcher pushes the limits of light to improve performance in communication, fabrication, and medical imaging

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The fields of data communication, fabrication, and ultrasound imaging share a common challenge when it comes to improving speed and efficiency: light’s diffraction limit. Nicholas Fang thinks his group at MIT might have found a solution.

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EU-project calls for greater coordination on coastal issues

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The Mediterranean is in need of uniform criteria and methods for delineating its coastlines, according to Professor Rachelle Alterman of the EU-funded Mare Nostrum project. Professor Alterman is calling on the governments of EU countries to establish a task force that will work towards achieving greater legal and cadastral coordination among EU countries on coastal issues.

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Observed population of endangered osprey increases sevenfold

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

In the last five years, the number of observed osprey – fish-eating birds of prey – in the Cayuga Lake basin have increased sevenfold, including a new nest this year near Game Farm Road on university athletic fields near Cornell’s campus.

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Bits Blog: Amazon Angles to Attract Hachette’s Authors to Its Side

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

Amazon suggested it would give Hachette’s authors all the revenue from their e-book sales on Amazon. Hachette’s response on Tuesday was to suggest that the retailer was trying to make it commit suicide.

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Man-made disasters fuel worldwide refugee crisis, professor says

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The United Nations recently released a report finding that the number of refugees in the world has climbed to more than 50 million – the highest number since the post-World War II era.

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NASA image: Saturn’s vortex and rings

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

The Cassini spacecraft captures three magnificent sights at once: Saturn’s north polar vortex and hexagon along with its expansive rings.

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Two CT-scanned Siberian mammoth calves yield trove of insights

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

(Phys.org) —CT scans of two newborn woolly mammoths recovered from the Siberian Arctic are revealing previously inaccessible details about the early development of prehistoric pachyderms. In addition, the X-ray images show that both creatures died from suffocation after inhaling mud.

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Bits Blog: You Don’t Have to Feel Very Guilty About Using Your Smartphone While Parenting

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

A preschool boy has a vacation. And his father finds a way to spend time with him and still get his work done.

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3-D hurricane view of Arthur reveals rain towers

Written By: admin - Jul• 10•14

While Hurricane Arthur was still a hurricane, the new Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory flew over the storm last week and captured its structure in 3-D. This was a good test of the new satellite, which is supposed to help NASA track these Atlantic storms to better precision than before.

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