Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

NASA Webb’s heart survives deep freeze test

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

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Yahoo Revenue and Profit Surpass Estimates

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Strong third-quarter results at Yahoo ended a long pattern of declines.

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DealBook: Google Invests in Magic Leap, an Augmented Reality Firm

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Google is leading a $542 million investment in a little-known firm called Magic Leap, in an investment that is said to value the start-up at about $2 billion.

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DealBook: After JPMorgan Cyberattack, a Push to Fortify Wall Street Banks

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Regulators are said to be discussing fortification of a critical area of cybersecurity: outside vendors, including law firms, accounting and marketing firms and even janitorial companies.

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DealBook: Google Invests in Magic Leap, an Augmented Reality Firm

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Google is leading a $542 million investment in a little-known firm called Magic Leap, in an investment that is said to value the start-up at about $2 billion.

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Bits Blog: F.T.C. Names New Chief Technologist

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Ashkan Soltani, an independent technology consultant, co-wrote some articles in The Washington Post’s Pulitzer-winning series based off Edward Snowden revelations.

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Biologist reels in data to predict snook production

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

FIU researcher Ross Boucek wants to give more predictability to anglers hoping to catch a bounty of snook.

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Atom-width graphene sensors could provide unprecedented insights into brain structure and function

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Understanding the anatomical structure and function of the brain is a longstanding goal in neuroscience and a top priority of President Obama’s brain initiative. Electrical monitoring and stimulation of neuronal signaling is a mainstay technique for studying brain function, while emerging optical techniques—which use photons instead of electrons—are opening new opportunities for visualizing neural network structure and exploring brain functions. Electrical and optical techniques offer distinct and complementary advantages that, if used together, could offer profound benefits for studying the brain at high resolution. Combining these technologies is challenging, however, because conventional metal electrode technologies are too thick (>500 nm) to be transparent to light, making them incompatible with many optical approaches.

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Apple sees iCloud attacks; China hack reported

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Apple said Tuesday its iCloud server has been the target of "intermittent" attacks, hours after a security blog said Chinese authorities had been trying to hack into the system.

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Bits Blog: Longtime Microsoft Executive Opens Cloud Database Start-Up

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Bob Muglia helped build Microsoft’s server and tools business into a $17 billion-a-year juggernaut. Now he’s running a cloud database start-up that has raised $26 million in funding.

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Ancient Greek well yields rare wooden statue

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Archeologists in Greece have uncovered a rare wooden statue preserved in the muddy depths of an ancient well in Piraeus, the port of Athens.

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US state reaches deal to keep dinosaur mummy

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

North Dakota reached a $3 million deal to keep a rare fossil of a duckbilled dinosaur on display at the state’s heritage center, where it will serve as a cornerstone for the facility’s $51 million expansion, officials said Tuesday.

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When the isthmus is an island: Madison’s hottest, and coldest, spots

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

As Dane County begins the long slide into winter and the days become frostier this fall, three spots stake their claim as the chilliest in the area.

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Dot Earth Blog: Is There Room for Agreement on the Merits and Limits of Efficient Lighting

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Seeking constructive dialogue on the merits and limits of clean, efficient lighting.

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China Attack Aims at Apple iCloud Storage Service

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Cybersecurity monitoring groups and security experts said iCloud users in China may have given away login information to a third party.

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Bits Blog: Staples Is Latest Retailer Hit by Hackers

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The company said it was working with law enforcement agencies to determine the extent of the problem. It is one of many retailers and restaurant chains to be hit by hackers over the last year.

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DealBook Column: The Truth Hidden by IBM’s Buybacks

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

IBM has posted large earnings and sent out large dividends to shareholders, but the company’s success has been tied more to financial engineering than actual performance.

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Bits Blog: Verizon Reports Higher Profit During a Price-Cutting War

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Amid a price-cutting war in the American wireless industry, the Verizon juggernaut keeps growing, even though its prices are generally higher.

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Special microscope captures defects in nanotubes

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

University of Oregon chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges.

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Hendersons introduce hoverboard and a future beyond wheels

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Greg and Jill Henderson are behind a hoverboard that uses a magnetic field to generate lift, and they have turned to crowdfunding to put the finishing touches on their California-based Hendo Hoverboard. They said that "perfecting it will take a little more time and resources," and their target date is October 2015. Their plan is to procure parts from a number of overseas suppliers, with the final assembly in Los Gatos, California.

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Ebola serum for Africa ‘in weeks’

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Treatments to tackle the Ebola outbreak in West Africa should become available in the coming weeks and months, says the World Health Organization.

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Bits Blog: Longtime Microsoft Executive Opens Cloud Database Start-up

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Bob Muglia helped build Microsoft’s server and tools business into a $17 billion-a-year juggernaut. Now he’s running a cloud database start-up that has raised $26 million in funding.

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Bits Blog: For Microsoft, Cloud Business Looks More Promising Than Mobile

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Despite being a laggard in cloud computing, Microsoft has established real credibility, and now runs twice as many data centers as Amazon and six times as many as Google.

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Bits Blog: Verizon Reports Higher Profit During a Price-Cutting War

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Amid a price-cutting war in the American wireless industry, the Verizon juggernaut keeps growing, even though its prices are generally higher.

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Machine Learning: Shopping With Apple Pay: Seamless in Stores but Quirky Online

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Integrating the new payment system with varied apps still has some flaws, but brick-and-mortar purchases are easy and fun.

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N. America treated to partial solar eclipse Thurs.

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

North Americans, get set for the fourth and final eclipse of the year.

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Team advances genome editing technique

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Customized genome editing – the ability to edit desired DNA sequences to add, delete, activate or suppress specific genes – has major potential for application in medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture.

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Verizon Posts Higher Revenue as Profit Estimates Fall Short

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The largest wireless carrier in the United States posted lower-than-expected quarterly earnings, but revenue rose as it added 1.5 million net subscribers.

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Q&A: Exporting Video From iPhoto

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Plus, tips on removing malicious software from browsers.

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More hackers targeting mobile phones to get bank info, survey says

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Hackers are increasingly targeting mobile phones to get into bank accounts of victims and steal money, security researchers said Tuesday.

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Testing shows billfish demonstrate bone remodeling without osteocytes

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

(Phys.org) —A large team of biologists with members from Israel, Germany, the U.K. and the U.S. has found that billfish are able to remodel their large protruding jawbones in the absence of osteocytes. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their research and results and the implications of what they found.

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Ebola serum for Africa ‘in weeks’

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Treatments to tackle the Ebola outbreak in West Africa should become available in the coming weeks and months, says the World Health Organization.

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Dot Earth Blog: Is There Room for Agreement on the Merits and Limits of Efficient Lighting

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Seeking constructive dialogue on the merits and limits of clean, efficient lighting.

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Sleepy sun could make Mars trips deadly

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

An unexpected lull in the sun’s activity will let more cosmic radiation into the solar system, endangering astronauts on long interplanetary missions

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Scientists show that evolution of complex bioluminescent traits may be predictable

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

A longstanding question among scientists is whether evolution is predictable. A team of researchers from UC Santa Barbara may have found a preliminary answer. The genetic underpinnings of complex traits in cephalopods may in fact be predictable because they evolved in the same way in two distinct species of squid.

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Scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have developed deeper understanding of the ideal design for mesoporous nanoparticles used in catalytic reactions, such as hydrocarbon conversion to biofuels. The research will help determine the optimal diameter of channels within the nanoparticles to maximize catalytic output.

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HP supercomputer at NREL garners top honor

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

A supercomputer created by Hewlett-Packard (HP) and the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that uses warm water to cool its servers, and then re-uses that water to heat its building, has been honored as one of the top technological innovations of the year by R&D Magazine.

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Researchers construct a model of impact for El Nino / La Nina events

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

(Phys.org) —A small team made up of researchers from the U.S. and Europe has constructed a model that helps map parts of the world that are most at risk of flooding due to El Niño/La Niña events. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how they compared weather data over the past half century with economic impacts of actual floods to create a model that may soon be used to help predict flooding events in the future.

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Turner channels removed from Dish amid pact spat

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Channels such as Cartoon Network and CNN are no longer part of Dish’s programming lineup as a deadline has passed for the satellite TV provider and Turner Broadcasting to renew their distribution agreement.

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Google’s streaming music service adds mood to mix

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Google’s music-subscription service will try to anticipate its listeners’ mood swings as it amplifies its competition with Pandora, Spotify and other popular services that play tunes over the Internet.

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Chaotic cosmic wombs may birth backwards planets

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Rebel planets orbit their stars the wrong way around – and prenatal turmoil may be to blame

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Biologists use unique tools to investigate squirrel sounds and gestures

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Everyone has watched squirrels playfully climbing trees, gracefully leaping from branch to branch, and scurrying across parks. Thaddeus McRae, Ph.D ’12, adjunct assistant research professor of biology in the University of Miami College of Arts Sciences, has taken these observations to a scientific level.

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Staples investigating possible data breach

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Staples is looking into a potential credit card data breach and has been in touch with law enforcement officials about the issue.

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Dot Earth Blog: Is There Room for Agreement on the Merits and Limts of Efficient Lighting

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Seeking constructive dialogue on the merits and limits of clean, efficient lighting.

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Kung fu stegosaur

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Stegosaurs might be portrayed as lumbering plant eaters, but they were lethal fighters when necessary, according to paleontologists who have uncovered new evidence of a casualty of stegosaurian combat. The evidence is a fatal stab wound in the pubis bone of a predatory allosaur. The wound – in the conical shape of a stegosaur tail spike – would have required great dexterity to inflict and shows clear signs of having cut short the allosaur’s life.

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Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered exceptional properties in a garnet material that could enable development of higher-energy battery designs.

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Rising above the risk: America’s first tsunami refuge

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Washington’s coast is so close to the seismically active Cascadia Subduction Zone that if a megathrust earthquake were to occur, a tsunami would hit the Washington shoreline in just 25 minutes.

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Ebola serum for Africa ‘in weeks’

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Treatments to tackle the Ebola outbreak in West Africa should become available in the coming weeks and months, says the World Health Organization.

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DealBook Column: The Truth Hidden by IBM’s Buybacks

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

IBM has posted large earnings and sent out large dividends to shareholders, but the company’s success has been tied more to financial engineering than actual performance.

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Less-numerate investors swayed by corporate report presentation effects

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Publicly traded corporations are increasingly publishing social responsibility reports for investors, who now consider such information alongside traditional financial data before investing in a company.

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Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

By analysing DNA extracted from the petrous bones of skulls of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified that these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices and 4,000 years after the onset of cheese-making among Central European Neolithic farmers.

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Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), evaluated consumers’ choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

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Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help.

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NASA sees Gonzalo affect Bermuda’s ocean sediment: Stirred, not shaken

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

NASA’s Aqua and Terra satellites captured before and after images of Bermuda and surrounding waters before and after Hurricane Gonzalo struck the island on Oct. 17. The images revealed how Gonzalo stirred up the sediment from the ocean bottom.

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Verizon Posts Higher Revenue as Profit Estimates Fall Short

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The largest wireless carrier in the United States posted lower-than-expected quarterly earnings, but revenue rose as it added 1.5 million net subscribers.

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For E.U. Climate Meeting, Deep Divisions and High Stakes

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Curbing emissions has long been a popular cause in the European Union. But leaders have to agree on how to generate and distribute energy.

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Beyond LOL cats, social networks could become trove of biodiversity data

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Whiplash the Cowboy Monkey. Grumpy Cat. "Peanut," the Ugliest Dog in the World. These might be a sampling of the most familiar animals to millions of users of social networking sites like Facebook.

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Study shows how texas campus police tackle stalking

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

One out of every five female students experience stalking victimization during their college career, but many of those cases are not reported to police, according to a study by the Crime Victims’ Institute (CVI) at Sam Houston State University.

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A legal trade in horn would improve rhino protection and help sustainable development

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The extinction in the wild of the southern white rhino population could be prevented by letting local communities take responsibility of the animals and giving them permission to harvest horns in a controlled manner through a legal trade. Rhino horn is made of the same material as human hair and fingernails and grows back in 2–3 years.

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Bite to the death: Sugarbag bees launch all-conquering raids

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

They may be tiny and stingless but there’s nothing sweet and innocent about a species of native Sugarbag bee when it goes to war over a coveted honey-filled hive.

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Verizon reports higher 3Q net income, revenue

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Verizon Communications Inc. on Tuesday reported higher net income and revenue in its third quarter, helped by strong wireless subscriber growth and demand for its FiOS Internet services.

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POLARBEAR detects curls in the universe’s oldest light

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have made the most sensitive and precise measurements yet of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background.

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Quantum internet could cross seas by container ship

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Communication using quantum means is super secure, but sending it long distance is a problem. Perhaps container ships are the solution

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A global surge of great earthquakes from 2004-2014 and implications for Cascadia

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The last ten years have been a remarkable time for great earthquakes. Since December 2004 there have been no less than 18 quakes of Mw8.0 or greater – a rate of more than twice that seen from 1900 to mid-2004. Hundreds of thousands of lives have been lost and massive damage has resulted from these great earthquakes. But as devastating as such events can be, these recent great quakes have come with a silver lining: They coincide with unprecedented advances in technological and scientific capacity for learning from them.

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DealBook Column: The Truth Hidden by IBM’s Buybacks

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

IBM has posted large earnings and sent out large dividends to shareholders, but the company’s success has been tied more to financial engineering than actual performance.

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Tractor beam breaks distance record

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Scientists have turned a laser into a reversible "tractor beam" that can repel or attract objects.

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Reading a biological clock in the dark

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Our species’ waking and sleeping cycles – shaped in millions of years of evolution – have been turned upside down within a single century with the advent of electric lighting and airplanes. As a result, millions of people regularly disrupt their biological clocks – for example, shift workers and frequent flyers – and these have been known to be at high risk for such common metabolic diseases as obesity, diabetes and heart disease. A new study published in Cell, led by Weizmann Institute scientists, reveals for the first time that our biological clocks work in tandem with the populations of bacteria residing in our intestines, and that these microorganisms vary their activities over the course of the day. The findings show that mice and humans with disrupted daily wake-sleep patterns exhibit changes in the composition and function of their gut bacteria, thereby increasing their risk for obesity and glucose intolerance.

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What happens when ultracold atomic spins are trapped in an optical lattice structure

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Every electrical device, from a simple lightbulb to the latest microchips, is enabled by the movement of electrical charge, or current. The nascent field of ‘spintronics’ taps into a different electronic attribute, an intrinsic quantum property known as spin, and may yield devices that operate on the basis of spin-transport.

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How to safely enjoy the October 23 partial solar eclipse

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

2014 – a year rich in eclipses. The Moon dutifully slid into Earth’s shadow in April and October gifting us with two total lunars. Now it’s the Sun’s turn. This Thursday October 23 skywatchers across much of the North America and Mexico will witness a partial solar eclipse. From the eastern U.S. the eclipse will reach maximum around the time of sunset, making for dramatic picture-taking opportunities. Further west, the entire eclipse will occur with the sun up in the afternoon sky. Either way, you can’t go wrong.

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Altitude and attitude in the fractious row over crying babies

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Aircraft passengers have strong opinions about what to do and whom to blame when a baby or small child starts crying mid-flight but the issue has been largely ignored by airlines, according to research.

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Students build Oculus Moon robot

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

US team develop a robot that can send back live pictures from the Moon as part of attempt to win Google’s Lunar X-Prize.

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Work on pioneering pan-European neutron facility underway

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

A state-of-the-art facility capable of generating neutron beams 30 times brighter than current facilities is about to be constructed in the Swedish town of Lund. The EUR 1.8 billion will help scientists examine and test new materials at the molecular level, with implications extending beyond nanotechnology, life sciences, pharmaceuticals, materials engineering and experimental physics.

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Making smartphone browsing 20% faster while reducing power consumption by 40%

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Nokia Networks today announced that it has conducted the first live network trial of a software feature that improves smartphone performance on 3G networks. Nokia High Speed Cell FACH cuts smartphone-generated network signaling by up to 80%, boosts response time by up to 65% and achieves up to 20% faster browsing. Up to 40% power savings, contributing to longer smartphone battery life for subscribers, were also shown. The tests were run on the commercial 3G/HSPA network of a major European operator using test devices fitted with Qualcomm Snapdragon processors that support High Speed Cell FACH.

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Freescale introduces world’s smallest integrated tire pressure monitoring system

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Freescale Semiconductor today introduced the FXTH87 tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) family, which is the smallest integrated package TPMS solution available at an extremely light weight of 0.3 grams. The FXTH87 family is 50 percent smaller than competing products, helping designers reduce overall bill of materials costs. Freescale’s newest TPMS system-in-package solution provides low power consumption combined with the highest level of functional integration in one package, featuring a dual-axis accelerometer architecture, pressure and temperature sensor, integrated MCU, RF transmitter and low frequency receiver.

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Wake up and smell the coffee … it’s why your cuppa tastes so good

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Most of what we taste we actually smell. The only sensations that we pick up in our mouth are sweet, sour, bitter, umami and salty. Without its smell, coffee would have only a sour or bitter taste due to the organic acids. Try it with your next cup of coffee – hold your nose as you take your first sip.

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What’s next for the smartphone in a rapidly changing market?

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

It should be no surprise to anyone that many smartphones may have been designed to last about 24 months – the length of a typical contract with a network service provider. After all, it is a fast-moving, high-turnover market and planned obsolescence is how it is kept moving.

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Julian Assange: ‘I hope there’s much still to come’

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The WikiLeaks co-founder says the internet can be both a tool of political empowerment and the road to dystopia

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Stopping the leaks

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

When a big old cast-iron water main blows, it certainly makes for a spectacular media event.

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Fishy vegetable production methods explained through aquaponics

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

If growing vegetables in a box with no soil and out of direct sunlight sounds a little fishy, well, it is.

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Sweeping air devices for greener planes

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The large amount of jet fuel required to fly an airplane from point A to point B can have negative impacts on the environment and—as higher fuel costs contribute to rising ticket prices—a traveler’s wallet. With funding from NASA and the Boeing Company, engineers from the Division of Engineering and Applied Science at Caltech and their collaborators from the University of Arizona have developed a device that lets planes fly with much smaller tails, reducing the planes’ overall size and weight, thus increasing fuel efficiency.

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How to grip an asteroid

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

For someone like Edward Fouad, a junior at Caltech who has always been interested in robotics and mechanical engineering, it was an ideal project: help develop robotic technology that could one day fly on a NASA mission to visit and sample an asteroid.

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Synthesis of a new lean rare earth permanent magnetic compound superior to Nd2Fe14B

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

A research group led by Dr. Kazuhiro Hono at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) in Tsukuba, Japan, synthesized a new magnetic compound, which requires a lesser amount of rare earth element than the currently used neodymium iron boron compound. The ratio of neodymium, iron and nitrogen in the new compound, NdFe12N, is 1:12:1. Its neodymium concentration is 17% compared to 27% for the neodymium iron boron compound known as Nd2Fe14B, the main component used in the strongest permanent magnets. Furthermore, the intrinsic hard magnetic properties were found to be superior to those of Nd2Fe14B. The result of this research will be published in Scripta Materialia on October 20, 2014.

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Eucla Basin survey uncovers odd rock formations

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Geologists have come to the tentative conclusion that relatively young Mesoproterozoic bedrock lies deep beneath the Nullabor, wedged between two much older formations.

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Plants can actually take care of their offspring – here’s how

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Plants may not travel around as animals do, but they have evolved many strategies that allow them to cope and make the most of the environment they live in. Examples can be found everywhere. For instance, succulence is the special characteristic that cacti have to store water and then use it as a reserve in their dry habitats. And there are plants that produce seeds that are dispersed by wind, allowing them to travel farther than they could possibly have gone otherwise.

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World record in data transmission with smart circuits

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Fewer cords, smaller antennas and quicker video transmission. This may be the result of a new type of microwave circuit that was designed at Chalmers University of Technology. The research team behind the circuits currently holds an attention-grabbing record. Tomorrow the results will be presented at a conference in San Diego.

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Materials for the next generation of electronics and photovoltaics

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

One of the longstanding problems of working with nanomaterials—substances at the molecular and atomic scale—is controlling their size. When their size changes, their properties also change. This suggests that uniform control over size is critical in order to use them reliably as components in electronics.

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Ephemeral soap bubbles give clue to how cells develop with regular shapes in tissues

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Biological development is a chaotic affair.

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Apple Pay could have been here 15 years ago if it wasn’t for boardroom egos

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Squabbling and a lack of compromise among collaborating dominant industry groups has stunted the growth of mobile payment according to Pinar Ozcan, an Assistant Professor of Strategic Management at Warwick Business School, and Dr Filipe Santos, of INSEAD. While in Kenya it has become the number one way of banking, with 80 per cent of cell phone owners using mobile payment according to the World Bank.

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The drive to create the coldest cubic meter in the universe

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The drive to create the coldest cubic meter in the universe may be centered in Italy, but its ultimate success will depend on instruments developed at Yale University.

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New guide shields Aussies from toxic groundwater, land

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

A cleaner, healthier, safer and more prosperous Australia is the goal of a new national framework for remediating contaminated sites.

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Amid zebra mussel infestation, experts call for boat inspection program

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

An infestation of zebra mussels at Offutt Base Lake in Bellevue is causing experts to call for a statewide boat inspection program.

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Retrofitting old buildings to make them earthquake safe

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Non-ductile reinforced concrete buildings are among the most common structures in the United States. They are also among the most deadly.

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DealBook Column: The Truth Hidden by IBM’s Buybacks

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

IBM has posted large earnings and sent out large dividends to shareholders, but the company’s success has been tied more to financial engineering than actual performance.

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Audi claims self-drive speed record

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Audi says one of its self-drive test cars topped 149mph (240km/h) at a race track in Germany, beating a human-driven version.

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Research on how surfaces respond under extreme conditions lead to energy advances

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Academics were always important for Bilge Yildiz, the daughter of two math teachers, as she was growing up in and around Izmir, Turkey. Her parents, Yildiz says, were her inspiration for appreciating "the importance of education and hard work."

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Researchers developing algorithms to detect fake reviews

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Anyone who has conducted business online—from booking a hotel to buying a book to finding a new dentist or selling their wares—has come across reviews of said products and services. Chances are they’ve also encountered some that just don’t seem legitimate. Researchers at the University of Kansas are developing algorithms and computational models to detect fake online reviews to improve commerce for consumers and businesses and to improve credibility of social media.

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Drinking water odors, chemicals above health standards caused by ‘green building’ plumbing

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Several types of plastic pipes in eco-friendly green buildings in the United States have been found to leach chemicals into drinking water that can cause odors and sometimes exist at levels that may exceed health standards.

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Pesticide bans ‘could hit UK crops’

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The EU’s decision to ban the use of some pesticides could threaten UK crops, increase food prices and hit farmers’ profits, a report claims.

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Bits Blog: Facebook Sues Lawyers for Pressing Dubious Ownership Case

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

The company says the former lawyers for Paul Ceglia, who claimed that Mark Zuckerberg had given him a large stake in Facebook, continued to argue his case despite knowledge that his evidence was fabricated.

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Bits Blog: Senator Calls on Comcast to Extend Net Neutrality Pledge

Written By: admin - Oct• 22•14

Senator Patrick Leahy, the Vermont Democrat, called on Comcast to commit to never allow so-called fast lanes on its network.

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