Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Social sensing game detects classroom bullies

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A social sensing game created at Illinois allows researchers to study natural interactions between children, collect large amounts of data about those interactions and test theories about youth aggression and victimization.

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Us vs universe: Seeing before the cosmos’s first light

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The universe’s dark age lasted for 380,000 years after the big bang. Now we’ve found ways to pierce the fog before light was set free

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Us vs universe: Adventures in breaking light speed

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

It’s the ultimate speed limit – but in some places, it seems the cosmic traffic cops are letting things slip

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Us vs universe: Taking the twinkle out of the stars

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

That pretty twinkling is a blurry plague for astronomers – but we can cancel it out with artificial stars and shape-shifting mirrors

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Us vs universe: Hold still while the Earth trembles

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

In the hunt for gravitational waves, tiny tremors set a limit on how sensitive any ground-based detector can be – so we’ve just got to go off-world

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Observatory: Are Some Professions Less Honest Than Others? Bank On It, Researchers Find

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Bankers have gotten a bit of a bad rep over the the last decade, owing to a variety of scandals. A new study may not help.

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New technology may speed up, build awareness of landslide risks

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Engineers have created a new way to use lidar technology to identify and classify landslides on a landscape scale, which may revolutionize the understanding of landslides in the U.S. and reveal them to be far more common and hazardous than often understood.

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Environmental bleaching impairs long-term coral reproduction

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A new study by a Florida State University biologist shows that bleaching events brought on by rising sea temperatures are having a detrimental long-term impact on coral.

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Unique sense of ‘touch’ gives a prolific bacterium its ability to infect anything

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

New research has found that one of the world’s most prolific bacteria manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism—a sense of touch. This unique ability helps make the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa ubiquitous, but it also might leave these antibiotic-resistant organisms vulnerable to a new form of treatment.

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What it’s like to have Parkinson’s for 15 minutes

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A theatre company in London is using simple technology to build a first-hand experience of disabling conditions like Parkinson’s

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Obama: US needs to bring schools into 21st century

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

President Barack Obama says the United States needs to bring its schools into the 21st century when it comes to technology.

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Apple to push Beats to all iPhones

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Apple plans to push the Beats streaming music service to every iPhone in the new year, according to a report in the Financial Times newspaper.

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Virginia to look at spaceport deal after explosion

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Virginia officials plan to re-examine a spaceport deal with Orbital Sciences Corp. following a rocket explosion that damaged a state-owned launch pad.

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City OKs plan for gas-pump climate change labels

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Climate-change warning labels are coming to gas pumps in Berkeley, California, a city with a long history of green and clean policies.

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Spiraling light, nanoparticles and insights into life’s structure

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

(Phys.org) —As hands come in left and right versions that are mirror images of each other, so do the amino acids and sugars within us. But unlike hands, only the left-oriented amino acids and the right-oriented sugars ever make into life as we know it.

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Florida harvester ants regularly relocate

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Florida harvester ants move and construct a similar subterranean nest about once a year, according to a study published November 19, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Walter Tschinkel from Florida State University.

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People’s movement perturbed during, but similar after Hurricane Sandy

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

New York City residents’ movement around the city was perturbed, but resumed less than 24-hours after Hurricane Sandy, according to a study published November 19, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Qi Wang and John Taylor from Virginia Tech.

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Endangered green turtles may feed, reside at Peru’s central, northern coast

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Peruvian coastal waters may provide suitable habitat that may help the recovery of endangered South Pacific green turtles, according to a study published November 19, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ximena Velez-Zuazo from University of Puerto Rico and colleagues.

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Hackathon develops tech tools to fight Ebola epidemic

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Innovations such as pulse readings by webcam and triage by SMS are just some of the ideas coders are pursuing to help rein in Ebola

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Gadgetwise: Soundhawk Smart Listening System: A Hearing Helper

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A device and app from Soundhawk, made to help people hear in certain settings, addresses problems that have hindered use of such devices in the past.

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Showdown looms between US gov’t, air bag maker

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A showdown is looming between U.S. safety regulators and a Japanese company that makes air bags linked to multiple deaths and injuries.

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How to teach self-driving cars ethics of the road

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A large truck speeding in the opposite direction suddenly veers into your lane.

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DealBook: Kik Messaging Start-Up Raises $38.3 Million and Acquires Service Based on GIFs

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The moves are aimed at helping Kik Interactive achieve its goal of becoming the Western version of WeChat, the enormously successful messaging service in China.

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App Smart: Apps to Compete With Snapchat in Temporary Messaging

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A review of some temporary messaging apps, for when you would prefer that your musings don’t live forever.

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Contact lenses with built-in video could be 3D printed

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A new technique for 3D-printing nanoscale LEDs into contact lenses could one day turn them into heads-up video display – or tools to spot pilot fatigue

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Geologists shed light on formation of Alaska Range

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Geologists in Syracuse University’s College of Arts and Sciences have recently figured out what has caused the Alaska Range to form the way it has and why the range boasts such an enigmatic topographic signature. The narrow mountain range is home to some of the world’s most dramatic topography, including 20,320-foot Mount McKinley, North America’s highest mountain.

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2008 Lacey Act Amendment successful in reducing US imports of illegally logged wood

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Recently published research by U.S. Forest Service economist Jeff Prestemon supports the contention that the 2008 Lacey Act Amendment reduced the supply of illegally harvested wood from South America and Asia available for export to the United States.

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Camera trap images help wildlife managers ID problem tigers in India

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Researchers with the Wildlife Conservation Society and other partners in India are using high-tech solutions to zero in on individual tigers in conflict and relocate them out of harm’s way for the benefit of both tigers and people.

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Scientists map mouse genome’s ‘mission control centers’

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

When the mouse and human genomes were catalogued more than 10 years ago, an international team of researchers set out to understand and compare the "mission control centers" found throughout the large stretches of DNA flanking the genes. Their long-awaited report, published Nov. 19 in the journal Nature suggests why studies in mice cannot always be reproduced in humans. Importantly, the scientists say, their work also sheds light on the function of DNA’s regulatory regions, which are often to blame for common chronic human diseases.

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Natural gut viruses join bacterial cousins in maintaining health and fighting infections

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Microbiologists at NYU Langone Medical Center say they have what may be the first strong evidence that the natural presence of viruses in the gut—or what they call the ‘virome’—plays a health-maintenance and infection-fighting role similar to that of the intestinal bacteria that dwell there and make up the "microbiome."

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Twine, the Video-Game Technology For All

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The text-based creation tool has brought a new artistry — and a new diversity — to the medium.

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‘Green Revolution’ changes breathing of the biosphere

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The intense farming practices of the "Green Revolution" are powerful enough to alter Earth’s atmosphere at an ever-increasing rate, boosting the seasonal amplitude in atmospheric carbon dioxide to about 15 percent over the past five decades.

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What agricultural ‘ecosystems on steroids’ are doing to the air

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

In a study that identifies a new, "direct fingerprint" of human activity on Earth, scientists have found that agricultural crops play a big role in seasonal swings of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

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Crops help to drive greater seasonal change in CO2 cycle

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Each year in the Northern Hemisphere, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) drop in the summer as plants inhale, and then climb again as they exhale and decompose after their growing season. Over the past 50 years, the size of this seasonal swing has increased by as much as half, for reasons that aren’t fully understood. Now a team of researchers led by Boston University scientists has shown that agricultural production may generate up to a quarter of the increase in this seasonal carbon cycle, with corn playing a leading role.

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Matter: Viruses as a Cure

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Our bodies are home to trillions of viruses, and new research hints that some of them may actually be keeping us healthy.

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As winter approaches, switching to cleaner heating oils could prevent health problems

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

With temperatures dipping, homeowners are firing up their heaters. But systems that require heating oil release fine particles outside that could have harmful health effects. Regulations to curb these emissions in New York City, however, could save hundreds of lives, a new study has found. The report in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology may have ramifications for the entire northeast, the country’s largest consumer of heating oil.

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Bits Blog: AT&T and Starbucks Bring Wireless Phone Chargers to Some Coffee Shops

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Wireless power charging has been around for years, but most people do not use it. AT&T and Starbucks are teaming up to try to make wireless charging more popular.

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Bits Blog: Chasing Entrepreneurial Opportunity in the Affordable Care Act

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The Affordable Care Act has opened up entrepreneurial opportunities for start-ups like Stride Health, a recommendation engine for health insurance.

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Researchers compare mammals’ genomes to aid human clinical research

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

For years, scientists have considered the laboratory mouse one of the best models for researching disease in humans because of the genetic similarity between the two mammals. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that the basic principles of how genes are controlled are similar in the two species, validating the mouse’s utility in clinical research.

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Thin film produces new chemistry in ‘nanoreactor’

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Physicists of the University of Groningen and the FOM Foundation, led by professor Beatriz Noheda, have discovered a new manganese compound that is produced by tension in the crystal structure of terbium manganese oxide. The technique they used to create this new material could open the way to new nanoscale circuits. Their findings were published on 20 November 2014 in the journal Nature.

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Bits Blog: Fidelity Makes a Virtual City of Stocks

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The financial services giant took a look at the virtual reality goggles from Oculus Rift, and created a city where buildings are stocks, their height determined by price and footprint by trading and shares.

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Business culture in banking industry favors dishonest behavior, study shows

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Bank employees are not more dishonest than employees in other industries. However, the business culture in the banking industry implicitly favors dishonest behavior, as an economic study at the University of Zurich indicates. A change in norms would thus be important in order to improve the battered image of the industry.

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Planning law change ‘catastrophic’

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Proposed changes to planning policy would be "catastrophic" for rural areas, rural housing and planning authorities warn.

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A gut reaction

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Queen’s University biologist Virginia Walker and Queen’s SARC Awarded Postdoctoral Fellow Pranab Das have shown nanosilver, which is often added to water purification units, can upset your gut. The discovery is important as people are being exposed to nanoparticles every day.

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New report explores NYC students’ pathways into and through college

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A new report from the Research Alliance for New York City Schools gives a first look at patterns of college enrollment, persistence, and completion for New York City high school students.

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Giving LEDs a cozy, warm glow

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

When the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded this October to three Japanese-born scientists for the invention of blue light emitting diodes (LEDs), the prize committee declared LED lamps would light the 21st century. Now researchers from the Netherlands have found a novel way to ensure the lights of the future not only are energy efficient but also emit a cozy warmth.

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Could hydrogen vehicles take over as the ‘green’ car of choice?

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Now that car makers have demonstrated through hybrid vehicle success that consumers want less-polluting tailpipes, they are shifting even greener. In 2015, Toyota will roll out the first hydrogen fuel-cell car for personal use that emits only water. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explains how hydrogen could supplant hybrid and electric car technology—and someday, even spur the demise of the gasoline engine.

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Lean times ahead: Preparing for an energy-constrained future

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Some time this century, the era of cheap and abundant energy will end, and Western industrial civilization will likely begin a long, slow descent toward a resource-limited future characterized by "involuntary simplicity."

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Federal budget authority for R&D in 2014 rises slightly

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

New data indicate that in fiscal year (FY) 2014, Congress gave federal agencies authority to spend $3.2 billion more on research and development and R&D plant (together) than in FY 2013. However, the increase only partially offset successive declines experienced in previous fiscal years.

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Paper electronics could make health care more accessible

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Flexible electronic sensors based on paper—an inexpensive material—have the potential to some day cut the price of a wide range of medical tools, from helpful robots to diagnostic tests. Scientists have now developed a fast, low-cost way of making these sensors by directly printing conductive ink on paper. They published their advance in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

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Bits Blog: Chasing the Entrepreneurial Opportunity in Affordable Care Act

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The Affordable Care Act has opened up entrepreneurial opportunities for start-ups like Stride Health, a recommendation engine for health insurance.

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College Applicants Sanitizing Social Media Profiles as More Schools Pry

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Warned that colleges are increasingly investigating digital histories, high school students are cleaning up their public social media activity.

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Mission Moon: Millions may help lunar landing

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

It’s the moon mission for the masses.

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Russia tests ‘satellite catcher’

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Russia may be testing a satellite capable of chasing down and inspecting other orbiting spacecraft, experts say.

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Ridesharing service Uber expands in Nordics

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Uber is expanding its app-based taxi and ridesharing services in the Nordic region, to include the cities of Helsinki, Oslo and Copenhagen.

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Current pledges not enough to stop global warming: UN report

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Pollution is still rising despite world pledges to cut carbon emissions, and more action is needed to rein in climate change in the coming years, a UN report said Wednesday.

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Professor proposes alternative to ‘Turing Test’

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

(Phys.org) —A Georgia Tech professor is offering an alternative to the celebrated "Turing Test" to determine whether a machine or computer program exhibits human-level intelligence. The Turing Test – originally called the Imitation Game – was proposed by computing pioneer Alan Turing in 1950. In practice, some applications of the test require a machine to engage in dialogue and convince a human judge that it is an actual person.

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‘Cloaking’ device uses ordinary lenses to hide objects across continuous range of angles

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Inspired perhaps by Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak, scientists have recently developed several ways—some simple and some involving new technologies—to hide objects from view. The latest effort, developed at the University of Rochester, not only overcomes some of the limitations of previous devices, but it uses inexpensive, readily available materials in a novel configuration.

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US and China’s emission cuts may not be enough

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Pledges made last week won’t keep global warming below the 2 °C limit. But adopting best practices could allow the US and China to go beyond those promises

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Geckos inspire ‘Spider-Man’ gloves

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The way geckos climb has inspired a device that allowed a 70kg man to scale a glass wall like Spider-Man.

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UK to get ‘faster, cheaper’ 4G data

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A decision to free up more spectrum for 4G means consumers can expect faster and cheaper data, says telecoms regulator Ofcom.

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Dot Earth Blog: Malaysia’s Prime Minister Says Fast-Growing Nations Have Role in Curbing Warming

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The prime minister of gas-rich Malaysia sees a climate-friendly path ahead.

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Android 5.0 update causes problems

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Early adopters of Android Lollipop are experiencing a range of issues, causing some users to complain their devices have become "unusable".

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Court puts more heat on diesels

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The government comes under renewed pressure to cut pollution from diesel vehicles following the latest ruling in a battle over clean air.

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New study shows ancient volcanic field in Utah actually one massive landslide

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

(Phys.org) —A trio of geologists in the U.S. has found that an ancient volcanic field in what is now southern Utah was actually once the site of one of the largest known landslides to ever occur on the planet. In their paper published in the journal Geology, David Hacker, Robert Biek and Peter Rowley describe the compelling evidence they found and conclude that a massive landslide occurred in the area approximately 22 million years ago.

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Pesticides linger longer in greenhouse crops

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Researchers writing in the journal Chemosphere this week found that crops typically grown under glasshouses and poly-tunnels had higher levels and numbers of different pesticides in them than those typically grown in the open.

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Captive mice and native mice don’t care to breed together, study finds

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

(Phys.org) —A combined team of researchers from the University of Melbourne and the organization Wildlife Conservation and Science has found that mice grown in captivity don’t necessarily breed with mice living in their natural environment—a finding that could have an impact on programs designed to increase diversity in wild populations. In their paper published in Royal Society Biology Letters, the researchers describe their study and results and suggest that there could be broad implications regarding what they found.

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DealBook: Kik Messaging Start-Up Raises $38.3 Million and Acquires Service Based on GIFs

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The moves are aimed at helping Kik Interactive achieve its goal of becoming the Western version of WeChat, the enormously successful messaging service in China.

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Graphics acceleration enables in-car technology seen at LA auto show

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

At the Los Angeles Auto Show’s Connected Car Expo Tuesday, NVIDIA and Audi showcased the latest innovations developed out of our partnership to deliver the auto industry’s most advanced in-car technologies.

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Winter-like temps can reduce tire pressure

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The polar plunge that has chilled much of the nation does more than bring out ice scrapers and antifreeze. It can trigger vehicles’ tire pressure monitoring systems overnight, sending nervous drivers to dealers and service centers.

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Fountain of youth underlies Antarctic Mountains

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Time ravages mountains, as it does people. Sharp features soften, and bodies grow shorter and rounder. But under the right conditions, some mountains refuse to age. In a new study, scientists explain why the ice-covered Gamburtsev Mountains in the middle of Antarctica looks as young as they do.

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Gecko inspired pads allow researchers to climb glass wall

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

A team of researchers working at Stanford University has used prior research involving the means by which gecko’s climb walls to create pads that allow a human to do very nearly the same thing. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the team describes how they improved on the ideas used by gecko’s to allow for the creation of pads capable of carrying the weight of a human while climbing a glass wall.

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Worldwide retreat of glaciers confirmed in unprecedented detail

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) is part of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder.

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Gift Guide: Dragons, aliens, heroes for the gamer

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Sony’s PlayStation 4 video-game console has built an impressive lead over its competitors. That’s good news for holiday shoppers because it has driven Microsoft and Nintendo to offer more budget-friendly holiday deals on their consoles.

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Climate change in drylands

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Approximately 40 percent of the earth’s surface is covered by drylands in which average annual precipitation is lower than evaporation. The changes projected to unfold in these areas in the course of climate change are alarming. Greater variations in annual and seasonal precipitation will lead to more frequent droughts and, presumably, longer drought periods. This means that drylands are among those areas most severely affected by climate change.

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Scientists convert agricultural waste to high-value silicon carbide

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Around the globe, billions of pounds of agricultural waste are generated every year. Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) are exploring ways to convert this waste into high-value silicon carbide that can be used for a variety of electronic and structural applications.

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The female of the species is harder to please than the male

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Female bats are fussier than males when it comes choosing where to eat in urban areas, according to new research from the University of Stirling.

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European urbanites breathing highly polluted air: report

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

As many as nine in 10 European city dwellers breathe air high in pollutants, blamed for 400,000 premature deaths every year, the European Environment Agency (EEA) said Wednesday.

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Rosetta’s comet looks weird in decade-old Hubble model

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Okay, let’s take a deep breath about Rosetta and remember just how far we’ve come since the mission arrived at its target comet in August. Lately we’ve been focused on reporting on the Philae landing, but remember how we barely knew how the comet looked until this summer? How much of a surprise the rubber duckie shape was to us?

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Shortly after Mars comet, NASA’s new red planet spacecraft officially starts mission

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

NASA’s newest Mars spacecraft is "go" for at least a year—and potentially longer. After taking a time-out from commissioning to observe Comet Siding Spring whizz by the Red Planet in October, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) officially began its science mission Monday (Nov. 17). And so far things are going well.

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Seed dormancy, a property that prevents germination, already existed 360 million years ago

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

An international team of scientists, coordinated by a researcher from the U. of Granada, has found that seed dormancy (a property that prevents germination under non-favourable conditions) was a feature already present in the first seeds, 360 million years ago.

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Record high data accuracy rates for phase-modulated transmission

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

We want data.  Lots of it.  We want it now.  We want it to be cheap and accurate.

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Image: Micro-sections of circuit boards intended for space missions

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Embedded within these resin discs are vital clues to determine whether future space missions will fail or thrive.

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Sun’s rotating ‘magnet’ pulls lightning towards UK

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

(Phys.org) —The Sun may be playing a part in the generation of lightning strikes on Earth by temporarily ‘bending’ the Earth’s magnetic field and allowing a shower of energetic particles to enter the upper atmosphere.

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DealBook: Kik Messaging Start-Up Raises $38.3 Million and Acquires Service Based on GIFs

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The moves are aimed at helping Kik Interactive achieve its goal of becoming the Western version of WeChat, the enormously successful messaging service in China.

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Company powers up with food waste

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Garden products company Richgro is using Western Australian food waste to power their operations in a new zero-waste system.

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Study suggests light may be skewing lab tests on nanoparticles’ health effects

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Truth shines a light into dark places. But sometimes to find that truth in the first place, it’s better to stay in the dark. That’s what recent findings at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) show about methods for testing the safety of nanoparticles. It turns out that previous tests indicating that some nanoparticles can damage our DNA may have been skewed by inadvertent light exposure in the lab.

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Alumnus finds solutions for food insecurity through aquaponics

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

During a routine stop at the grocery store, Miles Medina MS ’14 had a random thought. Why couldn’t the store grow the very produce it sells on its roof?

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Data analysis proves the existence of ‘the Rostigraben’

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Are the political parties really all that different from one another? Can politicians rig the vote in their favor by filling in their own profiles on the voting recommendation website "smartvote"? Two EPFL PhD students applied data analysis methods to information collected from the Swiss democratic system. Their results won them a "best paper award" in this year’s ACM Conference on Online Social Networks, held in Dublin, Ireland. Their next goal is to predict the outcome of a vote using partial results along with data from preceding ballots.

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Mystery of dwarf galaxy could be ejected black hole

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Astronomers have observed a mysterious phenomenon, which could be a massive black hole that has been ejected into space in connection with two galaxies colliding. This may be due to gravitational waves from the collision. The results are published in the scientific journal Monthly Notices, Royal Astronomical Society.

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Bottlenose dolphins use specific whistles as names

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Bottlenose dolphins in Africa use signature whistles to identify each other, say scientists investigating the animals communication.

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Archaeologists race against time to explore Neanderthal site

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

University of Southampton archaeologists are working to save important Palaeolithic remains at a rare Neanderthal site, before they are lost to the forces of nature.

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Polish election commission website hacked

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Computer hackers have attacked the website of Poland’s electoral commission, which is still unable to publish full returns from local elections because of an unrelated computer glitch, officials said Wednesday.

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Timberlake becomes co-owner of audio tech company

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Justin Timberlake wants to make sure you have a 20/20 sound experience when you listen to music: He’s now a co-owner of the audio technology company AfterMaster Audio Labs, Inc.

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Bits Blog: WhatsApp Adds Android Encryption

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The popular messaging platform is getting more secure with technology from Open Whisper Systems.

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DealBook: Kik Messaging Start-Up Raises $38.3 Million and Acquires Service Based on GIFs

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

The moves are aimed at helping Kik Interactive achieve its goal of becoming the Western version of WeChat, the enormously successful messaging service in China.

Read more here

Research team advances understanding of atomically thin crystal growth

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

(Phys.org) —UT’s College of Engineering has made recent headlines for discoveries that, while atomically small, could impact our modern world.

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Newer hybrids with shorter maturity dates provide corn producers options

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists are wrapping up a two-year study to determine the best combination of corn hybrids, planting dates and maturity to maintain yield and maximize water-use efficiency.

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China web conference draws criticism

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

China opens its first world internet conference with a call for more controls on cyberspace, amid criticism of Beijing’s web practices.

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As CO2 acidifies the oceans, scientists develop a new way to measure its effect on marine ecosystems

Written By: admin - Nov• 20•14

Following a 5,000 km long ocean survey, research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences presents a new way to measure how the acidification of water is affecting marine ecosystems over an entire oceanic basin.

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