Interesting Tech

collection of interesting topics on tech

Twitter to be used for payments in France

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

(AP)—Did someone spot you money for lunch two weeks ago? In France, Twitter users can now publicly repay debts, donate to charity or chip in for a gift with a new payment service backed by the country’s second-largest banking service.

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Key meteor showers experience a broad peak in October

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

On October 31st 2005, trick-or-treaters across the central U.S. eastern seaboard were treated to a brilliant fireball, a celestial spectacle that frequently graces October skies.

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Bigelow Inflatable Module to be added to space station in 2015

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station are going to be getting an addition in the near future, and in the form of an inflatable room no less. The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) is the first privately-built space habitat that will added to the ISS, and it will be transported into orbit aboard a Space X Falcon 9 rocket sometime next year.

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Researchers track fall migratory patterns of insects

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

To study the nocturnal flight patterns of migrating insects during the fall, researchers at the University of Delaware have been spending their nights on the Newark Farm launching a balloon equipped with a tow net to try to catalogue insect species.

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Optimizing how wind turbines work with machine learning

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Machine learning helps make complex systems more efficient. Regardless of whether the systems in question are steel mills or gas turbines, they can learn from collected data, detect regular patterns, and optimize their own operations. Researchers at Siemens are demonstrating that continuous learning also allows wind turbines to increase their electricity output.

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Well: In Interrogations, Teenagers Are Too Young to Know Better

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

A study of 57 videotaped interrogations of teenagers by the police found that none of them remained silent, suggesting they are particularly vulnerable at such times.

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A new innovative way to fertilize through leaves

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

A study conducted by researchers from UPM and the UAH suggests that foliar fertilization could be used as a tool in order to produce plants for high quality reforestation.

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New optimization methods make low notes sound better in small rooms

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Joy or rage? Both feelings are not far apart when dealing with the sound of deep notes in our homes. Those of us who do not own a large concert hall but have a normal living room instead, can quickly be driven to despair when the new bass speakers which sounded so good in the shop just now are set up at home: they are sometimes too loud, sometimes too quiet, sometimes they drone unpleasantly – nowhere in the room seems to be perfect.

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Fossilised bird egg offers clues to Brazil’s prehistoric past

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Brazilian scientists have discovered a near-intact fossilised bird egg – the country’s first – in Sao Paulo State.

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Researchers developed world’s first instant fluorescent sensor to detect milk fat

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has pioneered the world’s first fluorescent sensor – called Milk Orange – that rapidly identifies the presence of fat in milk. When the light purplish sensor is mixed with a milk sample, it transmits fluorescent signals of orange hues instantly under light when fat is detected, with brighter shades when the concentration of fat in the milk sample increases.

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Cross River gorillas to benefit from new protected area in Cameroon

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

The Prime Minister of Cameroon has signed a decree to officially create the Tofala Hill Wildlife Sanctuary in the south-west of the country – great news for Africa’s most threatened great ape, the Cross River gorilla.

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Tool evaluates more battery electrolyte possibilities in less time

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

For a battery to work, it needs an electrolyte to act as a bridge and carry ions from the anode to cathode and back again. However, batteries come in all shapes and sizes, and there is no one-size-fits-all approach to battery electrolytes. For example, electric vehicles and "smart" phones are both powered by rechargeable lithium ion batteries, but because the demand on the battery is so different, they require different electrolytes.

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Sandia invents sensor to learn about prosthesis fit; system to make fit better

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

As an amputee walks on a prosthetic leg during the day, the natural fluid in the leg shifts and the muscles shrink slightly.

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Study of electrons in space could help weather forecasting

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Researchers have discovered a formerly undetected impact of space weather on the polar atmosphere, which may explain some previously unexplained variations in winter weather patterns. Their results, published today (Tuesday 14 October), in the journal Nature Communications could have important implications for seasonal weather forecasting.

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J&J hikes 2014 forecast for a third time

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Johnson & Johnson lifted its 2014 earnings forecast a third time after pharmaceutical sales helped the world’s biggest maker of health care products trump analyst expectations for its recently concluded quarter.

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Bio-inspired ‘nano-cocoons’ offer targeted drug delivery against cancer cells

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a drug delivery system consisting of nanoscale "cocoons" made of DNA that target cancer cells and trick the cells into absorbing the cocoon before unleashing anticancer drugs. The work was done by researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Two-pronged approach prepares for bushfire threat

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

WA researchers have proposed a global measure for bushfire preparedness based on whether homeowners plan to evacuate or defend their property.

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Viral messaging research leads to Twitter-based emergency warning system

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

San Diego County is partnering with San Diego State University to develop a new social media–based platform for disseminating emergency warnings to San Diego citizens. The project, spearheaded by Ming-Hsiang Tsou, an SDSU geography professor, aims to allow San Diego County’s Office of Emergency Services to spread disaster messages and distress calls quickly and to targeted geographic locations, even if traditional channels such as phone systems and radio stations are overwhelmed.

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Arctic marine organisms capture CO2

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Arctic marine organisms act as a reservoir for CO2, according to research published in the international journal Geophysical Research Letters.

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Giant spin-splitting on the surface of strontium titanate

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

The need for ever faster and more efficient electronic devices is growing rapidly, and thus the demand for new materials with new properties. Oxides, especially ones based on strontium titanate (SrTiO3), play an important role here. Researchers recently discovered that SrTiO3, although actually an insulator, can form a metallic layer on its surface, in which electric current can flow.

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Bits Blog: The August Smart Lock Shows Why You Should Stick With Dumb Keys

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

The August smart lock allows you to open your front door with a smartphone. Who needs that?

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Ebola treatments – how far off?

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

How far away is a treatment and vaccine?

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Russian hackers targeted Nato PCs

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Russian hackers repackaged and re-used an old bug to gain access to computers in Nato, western governments and Ukraine.

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Additive manufacturing technology can print using plastic, paste or concrete

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Using different modules, the "3D Modular" can print using several materials like plastic, paste or concrete.

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Researchers find oil platforms among the most productive fish habitats in the world

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

A team of researchers in California has found that oil and natural gas platforms that exist off the coast of that state provide one of the most productive fish habitats in the world. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their study conducted over a several year period and what it could mean for the future of such platforms.

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Quantum test strengthens support for EPR steering

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Although the concept of "steering" in quantum mechanics was proposed back in 1935, it is still not completely understood today. Steering refers to the ability of one system to nonlocally affect, or steer, another system’s states through local measurements. The two systems are entangled, but it is an especially strong type of entanglement in which the systems are not just correlated, but correlated in a specific direction. Schrödinger originally proposed the concepts of entanglement and steering in response to a well-known Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paper that criticized quantum mechanics.

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Assessment of the technical feasibility of the proposed Mars One mission

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

In 2012, the "Mars One" project, led by a Dutch nonprofit, announced plans to establish the first human colony on the Red Planet by 2025. The mission would initially send four astronauts on a one-way trip to Mars, where they would spend the rest of their lives building the first permanent human settlement.

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Russian Hackers Used Bug in Microsoft Windows for Spying, Report Says

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

The targets were often linked to the standoff in Ukraine, said iSight Partners, the computer security firm that released the report.

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Bits Blog: French Bank to Allow Sending Money With Tweets

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Groupe BPCE, one of the country’s largest banks, will introduce a service that will link individuals’ Twitter accounts to the bank’s existing money transfer service.

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Web-Era Trade Schools, Feeding a Need for Code

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Dozens of the schools have sprung up around the country to teach computer programming, offering students a fast-paced curriculum and the promise of jobs.

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Only 58 percent of votes cast on tamper-resistant systems counted

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

A Rice University study of tamper-resistant voting methods revealed that only 58 percent of ballots were successfully cast across three voting systems. The researchers concluded additional work is needed to make voting both secure and user-friendly.

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Graphene proves a long-lasting lubricant

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

When trying to design a mechanical system to last as long as possible, scientists and engineers have to find ways of overcoming friction. While researchers have found many materials that help to reduce friction, conventional lubricants often have chemical limitations. A recent analysis at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory has identified the properties of a newer, exceptionally wear-resistant substance that works in a broader range of environments.

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Precise control over genes results from game-changing research (w/ Video)

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

The application of a new, precise way to turn genes on and off within cells, described online October 9, 2014 in two articles in the journal Cell, is likely to lead to a better understanding of diseases and possibly to new therapies, according to UC San Francisco scientists.

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Researchers record sight neurons in jumping spider brain (w/ Video)

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

For the first time, a team of interdisciplinary researchers have made recordings of neurons associated with visual perception inside the poppy seed-sized brain of a jumping spider (Phidippus audax).

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Quantum computing poised for new silicon revolution

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

A dramatic increase in the amount of time data can be stored on a single atom means silicon could once again play a vital role in the development of super-fast computers.

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They like to watch, yes, but that’s just the beginning

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

Kai Huotari was a visiting scholar at Berkeley’s School of Information in the spring of 2011, when the Fox TV series Glee—a weekly musical drama about the fictional McKinley High School glee club—took an unexpectedly interesting turn. While the club’s lovable misfits struggled, as usual, to navigate the shoals of sex, social life and show tunes, the Twitter hashtag "#Glee" now floated persistently in the lower-right corner of the screen.

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Call to probe UK firm over ‘spying’

Written By: admin - Oct• 15•14

The National Crime Agency is asked to investigate a British company for allegedly aiding the surveillance of Bahraini activists in the UK.

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Samsung achieves Wi-Fi data travel feats for 60GHZ band

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Samsung Electronics has announced advances in Wi-Fi technology. Samsung said it found a way to make Wi-Fi data travel faster than it does currently. Specifically, Samsung said the new technology enables data transmission speeds of up to 4.6Gbps, or 575MB per second, a fivefold increase from 866Mbps, or 108MB per second, which the company said was the maximum speed possible with existing consumer electronics devices. Eventually, consumers will see the results of these efforts within various connected devices.

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Researchers synthesize ferromagnetic superconducting compound amenable to chemical modification

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Chemists at Ludwig-Maximilias-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have synthesized a ferromagnetic superconducting compound that is amenable to chemical modification, opening the route to detailed studies of this rare combination of physical properties.

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Google: Amazon is biggest rival

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Google chairman Eric Schmidt says the firm’s biggest rival in the search space is e-commerce giant Amazon.

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1 in 3 teens meeting from social media

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

An exclusive survey for Newsbeat reveals teenagers’ attitudes to social media, with a third meeting online-only "friends".

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"The Evil Within" video game crafted to be scary fun

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Horror genre video game master Shinji Mikami is throwing open a door to wickedly crafted terror with the Tuesday release of "The Evil Within."

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Money grows on trees with great walnuts of China

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Grinning with pride, a Chinese farmer held out two precious walnuts—globes so precisely symmetrical that consumers in search of hand massages value them more highly than gold.

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Matter: Rats and Their Alarming Bugs

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

A study of pathogens carried by New York City rats surprises public health officials.

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Plumpest pumpkin: 2,058-pound gourd sets record

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

(AP)—A pumpkin weighing 2,058 pounds has taken first prize and set a tournament record at an annual pumpkin-weighing contest in Northern California.

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Rare beaked whale washes up in Australia

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

A rare beaked whale washed up in Australia Tuesday, exciting researchers who know little about an animal that spends much of its time diving at depth far from shore.

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Internet caretaker ICANN to escape US control

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

The head of the private agency entrusted with running the Internet has said that the group is on course to break free of US oversight late next year.

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With their mark on Earth, humans may name era too

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

(AP)—People are changing Earth so much, warming and polluting it, that many scientists are turning to a new way to describe the time we live in. They’re calling it the Anthropocene (AN’-thruh-poh-seen)—the age of humans.

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New clues behind the resilience of a leading sexually transmitted pathogen, Chlamydia

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

In the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, authors Domman, et al. have explored factors behind the resilience of the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., chlamydia, with an estimated 1 million infected.

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Matter: Rats and Their Alarming Bugs

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

A study of pathogens carried by New York City rats surprises public health officials.

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New clues behind the resilience of a leading sexually transmitted pathogen, Chlamydia

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

In the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, authors Domman, et al. have explored factors behind the resilience of the most common sexually transmitted disease in the US, chlamydia, with an estimated 1 million infected.

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Teenage baseball pitchers at risk for permanent shoulder injury

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Young baseball pitchers who throw more than 100 pitches per week are at risk for a newly identified overuse injury that can impede normal shoulder development and lead to additional problems, including rotator cuff tears, according to a new study.

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Slow enteral feeding protocol can reduce instances of death in extreme preterm infants

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

A standardized slow enteral feeding protocol significantly reduces the incidence of necrotizing enterocoltis, or death of intestinal tissue, and death in infants with extremely low birth weight, according to a new study.

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Memories of pain during childbirth tied to intensity rather than length of labor

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Childbirth is physically intense and, for many women, it is the most painful experience they will have. And yet, new research shows that the amount of time a woman spends in labor doesn’t seem to impact how she remembers her labor pain afterwards. The research, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, reveals that the peak and end levels of pain women experienced, and whether they received an epidural, impacted their recall of labor pain afterward.

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Study sheds light on factors that may contribute to pancreatic cancer

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

New research that provides a better understanding of pancreatic cancer may help identify individuals at increased risk.

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Fly genome could help us improve health and our environment

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

The house fly might be a worldwide pest, but its genome will provide information that could improve our lives. From insights into pathogen immunity, to pest control and decomposing waste, the 691 Mb genome has been sequenced and analyzed by a global consortium of scientists, and is published in the open access journal Genome Biology.

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In ‘Cosmigraphics,’ Our Changing Pictures of Space Through Time

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Over thousands of years, humans have tried to represent the universe in graphic form, whether in manuscripts, paintings, prints, books or supercomputer simulations.

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Ebola Puts Nina Pham, a Nurse Unaccustomed to the Spotlight, in Its Glare

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Friends described the 26-year-old, part of the team that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, as conscientious and caring, and from a very private family.

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Scientists Rein In Fears of a Virus Whose Mysteries Tend to Invite Speculation

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Experts rule out the ideas that Ebola has become a super-pathogen and that it might make terrifying mutations in the months to come.

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Questions Rise on Preparations at Hospitals to Deal With Ebola

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

After a nurse at a Dallas hospital contracted Ebola, medical experts have begun to suggest that it might be better to transfer patients to designated centers with special expertise.

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Debate Over Ebola Turns to Specific Policy Requests

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Republicans blame the Obama administration for failing to protect the United States. Now Democrats are saying it is G.O.P. budget cutting that has put Americans at risk.

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Plants ‘absorb more CO2 than thought’

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Global climate models under play the amount of CO2 being absorbed by plants according to new research.

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C.D.C. Rethinking Methods to Stop Spread of Ebola

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

The transmission of the virus to a nurse in Dallas forced the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to study how health officials perform infection control at hospitals.

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C.D.C. Rethinking Methods to Stop Spread of Ebola

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will study how health officials perform infection control at hospitals.

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Ebola Puts Nina Pham, a Nurse Unaccustomed to the Spotlight, in Its Glare

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Friends described the 26-year-old, part of the team that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, as conscientious and caring, and from a very private family.

Read more here

DealBook: Tired of Being Rebuffed, France’s Iliad Ends Bid for T-Mobile US

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

The French telecommunications company ended its pursuit, despite having increased the size of the stake it was willing to acquire and the price it was willing to pay.

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When does an app need regulating?

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Should you be worried about health apps?

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Hard Cases: With Electronic Medical Records, Doctors Read When They Should Talk

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

In the middle of a simmering crisis in medical data management, doctors shouldn’t be spending all their time reading information recorded by others. They should be talking to patients.

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Well: In Interrogations, Teenagers Are Too Young to Know Better

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

A study of 57 videotaped interrogations of teenagers by the police found that none of them remained silent, suggesting they are particularly vulnerable at such times.

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Well: Ask Well: Ebola on Airplanes, Ebola in Sneezes

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Can I get Ebola on a flight? What is the likelihood of Ebola being spread by sneezes?

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Bits Blog: Am I Sick? Google Has a Doctor Waiting on Video

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Google’s “Helpouts” platform is experimenting with a new product that lets consumers talk to doctors over video.

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A Bank Chief Makes Ebola His Mission

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Dr. Jim Yong Kim, the World Bank president, has driven the normally lumbering bank to act on Ebola with uncharacteristic speed and become a key figure in a crisis that has exposed yawning gaps in the world’s capacity to respond to deadly epidemics.

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Global Health: Polio on the Rise Again in Pakistan, Officials Say

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Last week, Pakistan reported 202 cases of paralysis from polio, the first time in 14 years the figure topped 200.

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Bits Blog: Am I Sick? Google Has a Doctor Waiting on Video

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Google’s “Helpouts” platform is experimenting with a new product that lets consumers talk to doctors over video.

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Bits Blog: Amazon and Its Missing Books

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

As its dispute with the publisher continues, Amazon wants to make it difficult to buy Hachette books, but it does not want to be accused of banning them.

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Well: Ask Well: Ebola on Airplanes, Ebola in Sneezes

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Can I get Ebola on a flight? What is the likelihood of Ebola being spread by sneezes?

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Health Care: Death Has Its Benefits, Giraffes Among Us, Not Hiding Hair Loss

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Letters to the editor and online comments.

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Some sections of the San Andreas Fault system in San Francisco Bay Area are locked, overdue

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Four urban sections of the San Andreas Fault system in Northern California have stored enough energy to produce major earthquakes, according to a new study that measures fault creep. Three fault sections – Hayward, Rodgers Creek and Green Valley – are nearing or past their average recurrence interval, according to the study published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA).

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Hard Cases: With Electronic Medical Records, Doctors Read When They Should Talk

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

In the middle of a simmering crisis in medical data management, doctors shouldn’t be spending all their time reading information recorded by others. They should be talking to patients.

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In ‘Cosmigraphics,’ Our Changing Pictures of Space Through Time

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Over thousands of years, humans have tried to represent the universe in graphic form, whether in manuscripts, paintings, prints, books or supercomputer simulations.

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Bits Blog: Kmart and Dairy Queen Report Data Breach

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Kmart and Dairy Queen join nearly a dozen merchants that have had their in-store payment systems compromised with malware over the last year.

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Pentagon to unveil plan for dealing with climate change

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

At a meeting that brings together many of the world’s foremost military leaders, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is expected to reveal how the ongoing effects of global climate change pose an urgent risk to national security and require extensive rethinking of many aspects of the U.S. military.

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Rent-to-own business to pay $28 million settlement

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

(AP)—The California attorney general has announced a $28 million settlement with a furniture and computer rental business that allegedly violated consumer protection and privacy laws.

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Wonder stuff: Heat scavengers promise energy bonanza

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

A new breed of structures called skutterudites could finally tap the floods of energy our machines waste as heat

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Bits Blog: Cloud Computing Is Forcing a Reconsideration of Intellectual Property

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

The technology industry has fought bitterly over patents and other property rights. Could the fast-moving changes brought on by cloud computing make those fights less important?

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Observatory: Prosthetic Hands With a Sense of Touch

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Two men with nerve electrodes implanted in their prosthetic arms were able to perform complex sensory tasks, a new study found.

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Automatic authors: Making machines that tell tales

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

It’s one of the toughest challenges in artificial intelligence: teaching a computer to understand us so well that it can write a story we’ll want to hear

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Observatory: A Threat Is Seen in Pumas’ Isolation

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Human development is causing a sharp decline in genetic diversity among mountain lions in Southern California, a study says, and could make them less resilient to change.

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Spiderman may swing over Beijing in new theme park

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

(AP)—Spiderman could soon swing over Beijing, chasing Optimus Prime and despicable minions through a $3.3 billion Universal theme park aimed at capitalizing on China’s rising middle class and growing demand for all things animated.

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Microrobots armed with new force-sensing system to probe cells

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Inexpensive microrobots capable of probing and manipulating individual cells and tissue for biological research and medical applications are closer to reality with the design of a system that senses the minute forces exerted by a robot’s tiny probe.

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How big data algorithms see us – while they eat us up

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

From home shopping to homeland security, big data’s sausage machine is devouring us all, according to Christian Rudder’s future-looking Dataclysm

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Bits Blog: Amazon and Its Missing Books

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

As its dispute with the publisher continues, Amazon wants to make it difficult to buy Hachette books, but it does not want to be accused of banning them.

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Dark matter could light up giant mirror

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Low-cost detector is designed to glimpse "hidden photons"

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Doctors connecting to symptoms searchers in Google trial

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

You know how the Internet is a go-to hub of content and a risky end-all of content as advice you should use. You know this each time you had an ache or pain and looked up your symptoms. You came away with the choice of either making out your final will or taking one aspirin and going to bed at 10. A Google trial might be of interest, which will let you talk with doctors.

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Researchers make first observation of atoms moving inside bulk material

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have obtained the first direct observations of atomic diffusion inside a bulk material. The research, which could be used to give unprecedented insight into the lifespan and properties of new materials, is published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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Wildlife groups sue for wolverine protections

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

(AP)—A coalition of advocacy groups has filed a lawsuit challenging the government’s decision to deny federal protections for the snow-loving wolverine.

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US firm Steris Corp buys Synergy Health for $1.9bn

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

US pharmaceuticals firm Steris Corp. said Monday it has agreed a $1.9-billion (1.5-billion-euro) takeover of Britain’s Synergy Health, in a deal which will cut its tax bill.

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Google says Amazon biggest search engine rival

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

Google boss Eric Schmidt said Monday his company’s biggest competition as a search engine came from e-commerce giant Amazon, not from its traditional rivals.

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C.D.C. Reviewing Procedures After New Case of Ebola in Dallas

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will study how how health officials perform infection control at hospitals.

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Q&a: Heavy Backpacks on Little Backs

Written By: admin - Oct• 14•14

A backpack’s load should not exceed 10 to 15 percent of the child’s weight, according to a review article.

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